Schumann composes her Imaginations
Sep29

Schumann composes her Imaginations

Associate professor, world renowned pianist and artistic director are just a few of the many words used to describe Dr. Michelle Schumann. She has been a professor at the university for seven years, but a pianist for many more. “I love being able to express myself through the piano,” she said. “I was 5 years old when my parents brought home our first piano, and I wanted to play it all the time, so I started taking lessons right away,” she said. Her achievements include a doctorate of musical arts from the University of Texas, a Young ArtistDiploma from the Cleveland Institute of Music and a Performance Diploma from the Vienna Conservatory. Schumann performs locally as well as worldwide, touring in Canada and Europe, playing solo concerts and collaborating with top ensembles throughout the U.S. Sophomore music major Nick Arbuckle was impressed with Schumann’s accomplishments. “I can’t believe that she … has done so much and dedicated so much of herself to learning all about the piano,” he said. Schumann just released her fi rst CD titled “Imaginations.” It is composed of works described as fantasy, an emotional genre. She said creating the CD was a “culmination of a lot of study and really forming who you are and what is important to you as an artist.” English department chairperson Dr. Brady Peterson believes that Schumann is “brilliant.” “By her own admissions she plays with emotion. I don’t know which is better, to watch her play or to close your eyes and listen to her music.” Schumann loves the idea of communicating without words and letting her music speak to listeners. “Having the means to be able to transform people’s feelings through music is the most wonderful thing,” she said. “I love the transformative nature of music.” Senior recreation major Dennis Greeson attended her CD release concert and party Sept. 17, and noted how low-key and personal her concert was. “Before each piece she would share her heart and talk about the emotions stirred up in her through the journey of learning each piece,” he said. Schumann believes achieving her goals is never as rewarding as the hard work and dedication it takes to get there. Instead, she focuses on the journey of working hard consistently and reaping her benefits in the end. “Being a university professor was a huge goal of mine, but I didn’t set myself in a certain path to make sure that happened,”she said. “In many ways it was a gift from God. I worked steadily and it happened.” Schumann enjoys her interaction with students. “I love being able to teach my art to the...

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Million dollars for the arts
Sep29

Million dollars for the arts

The College of Visual and Performing Arts received a one million dollar donation from The Eula Mae and John Baugh Foundation. In life, the Baughs were philanthropists. Today, their daughter and president of the foundation board, Babs Baugh, continues their legacy. Vice President of Communications and Special Projects Paula Price Tanner said the university received many gifts from the foundation. “The size of those gifts has steadily increased over the years, but this is the largest, by far, that the foundation has given to the university,” she said. The recent donation was given to the College of Visual and Performing Arts to help with renovations. “This is the first major gift toward this project. We hope that it generates interest and will lead others to give, as well.” Tanner said. In the spring, Dr. Randy O’Rear, Dr. Jerry Bawcom and Tanner visited with Babs Baugh and her daughters Julie and Jackie. O’Rear said it took many steps to solidify the donation. “Dr. Bawcom and Dr. Tanner had spent many months working with the Baugh family … stating … our needs on campus for visual performing arts facilities.” This year, they decided to help the College with renovations. “We’re pleased that (the Baughs) … have chosen to make an investment of that size in the university,” O’Rear said. Presser is structurally sound, but it was built in a time when only small practice rooms for individual lessons were needed. Since then, the college’s needs have changed to include giant rehearsal halls, classrooms and a larger art department. O’Rear said, “We have lots of needs. We need a new art building …. We need a band hall. We need to renovate Hughes Recital Hall. We need renovations to Presser …. At this point, I think we’re still … trying to put together the best plan for how to … adequately address the needs.” Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts Ted Barnes is excited about this renovation. “The art department and the music department both do a really, really fine job. They are dedicated and talented teachers,” he said. Barnes sees new opportunities opening up for the future because of the money being raised. “It certainly means, in my mind, better teaching, better instruction (and) better scholarship through better facilities,” Barnes said. The senior leadership met this past spring and summer about the project. Tanner said this fall the faculty and staff will comment on the plans. “Once that summary is finished, we expect to resume work on the visual and performing arts project and make some definite plans about where facilities will be, what they will be and...

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Students call for variety
Sep29

Students call for variety

Things at Hardy Hall are changing. The upgraded pizza area and new international station are the most obvious improvements. They add more daily variety to the Sodexhorun facility’s menu, and students are taking notice. For breakfast students can get omelets and eggs to order. For lunch and dinner, the versatile island serves stir fry, pasta and other dishes. In an effort to maintain needed seating space, the new station is centered in the main serving area under a large red sign reading “Exhibitions.” Often the line for the dish being served stretches through the middle of the serving area. Improvements are nothing new for Hardy. “A few years ago, we put together a student group and asked them what changes they would make to Hardy,” said Dwayne Drake, general manager of the dining facility. “The first thing was the deli which we implemented last year. Next was improving the pizza area and creating the international station.” The enhanced pizza station includes a new oven and two new hot wells for pasta and sauce. Students appreciate the new amenities. “They have calzones. How awesome is that?” said Zach Raygoza, director of spiritual life and junior Christian ministry major, as he sat down to eat with friends. Vice President for Student Life Dr. Byron Weathersbee and President Randy O’Rear spent time meeting with students feedback. Drake said the comments were positive. “My freshman year I wanted to eat my plate; now I enjoy the food,” senior computer graphic design major Matthew Kasper said as he cut a piece of his chicken fried steak. Healthy choices are also making an impact on the dining menu. The new serving areas contains more body conscience options than before. Students can stay hydrated from the new fruit water that is available. This is a healthy alternative to soda. The staff at Hardy Dining facility also has a reputation for being pleasant and helpful. Students have asked the chef for requests and found the specifics they asked for available within days. Changes won’t be stopping anytime soon. A new grill station is expected in the future once space is available. Tim Johnson of the University of Missouri-Kansas City will become the Hardy head cook on Sept. 30th as part of the Sodexo traveling chef program. Culinary experts from different universities journey to other schools for the night to share their recipes. Johnson will be presenting Italian cuisine. Drake said it takes about a semester to really know how students feel about the changes to the dining facility, but so far, he said, “the response is...

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Imagination is used as a tool to transform scrap items into new artwork

Ribbons, thread, a roll of cloth, glue and a photo can all seem to be useless on their own. However, if these assorted items are put together, a wonderful photo collage is made. Craft Cru is an organization on campus that is dedicated to anything handmade. Members do their best to be creative, encourage one another and share new ideas. Students get to use their skills to make colorful art, to decorate their dorm rooms or apartments. It all started in the spring of 2008. Senior computer graphics major and president of Craft Cru Holly Gaskamp had always loved arts and crafts, since she was a child. Gaskamp was given an assignment in which she was to find a blog about something she was interested in. She discovered blogs about little stuffed animals that could be made relatively easy and went to Wal-Mart where she bought a small sewing machine for $20. “I saved up and bought a real sewing machine and taught myself how to use it with the Internet and YouTube videos,” Gaskamp said. “I loved it so much that I looked into other things I could do and thought how fun it would be to have a club where other people could come and make crafts too. The rest is history.” In the past, the organization has taught people how to sew their own pillows and crochet different designs and images. This semester, Craft their crafts and making them on a budget. Their projects, will include turning old CD cases into collages and teaching members how to make ribbon boards with cardboard and old sweatshirts. Junior organismal biology major Mike Kroll is vicepresident of Craft Cru. “What I really like about the group is that we are able to create art through items that many people would either throw away, or not think about using to create something new,” Kroll said, “Crafting also allows people to show their creativity in an incredibly unique and individual way. This way, no two crafts are ever alike.” Craft Cru meets every other week, on Tuesdays at 9 p.m. in the Shannon Commons. Five meetings are planned this semester, as well as two campus-wide events. Information about the organization is sent out through the group on Facebook. Administrative Assistant Joy Childress became the sponsor. This helps the group, as it is in the process of becoming an official, on-campus organization. “They have done a lot of work so far by setting up officers and meetings on their own, and it makes me very excited about being the sponsor for Craft Cru,” Childress to take items and recycle them into fun...

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Crusaders give back to their community
Sep29

Crusaders give back to their community

While most college students were sleeping on the morning of Sept. 26, many Crusaders were awake and to serve at a campus wide event. “Reaching Out is an opportunity for UMHB students to give back to the community,” Junior Christian studies major and director Zachary Raygoza said. “It went really well. We had a big turnout.” Students met on campus at 8 a.m. They then separated into groups and ventured to various locations around the city . Sophomore business major Tobin Davies served at Treehouse Farms. “We painted the inside of the rehabilitation center,” he said. “There were 15 of us that did it. It took us most of the time, but we still had time to clean up the paint supplies when we were finished.” Junior nursing major Jacquie Case spent her morning at Helping Hands. “My group had to help strip the floors for repairs,” she said. “We also boxed up frozen broccoli and carrots  for them to give to their clients and helped to pick up trash.” Approximately 200 volunteers donated their time to serve, including dorm directors and professors. Junior exercise and sport science major Roger Sanchez enjoyed his time serving. “It was a humbling experience,” he said. “I really enjoyed being able being able to give back to the city. Belton has done University of Mary Hardin-Baylor and I’m glad we were able to do the same.” “One of my favorite sites was Churches Touching Lives for Christ,” Raygoza said. “It was more raw for them.” Senior business management major Veronica Sullivan participated at the location. “We helped to fold clothes, and we bagged groceries,” she said. “We also filled up bottles with laundry detergent. There was a constant flow of people who needed the items. We had a great team with great team work.” “One lady I saw, had five kids and one of them was only a month old. She was getting clothes for them. I was like ‘wow’, you could tell the people community.” Volunteers also had a choice to help with Won’t You be My Neighbor. “The event is an opportunity for the local community to do local outreach,” said campus missionary Jena Coulson. “We had 120 volunteers show up for Won’t You be My Neighbor, including the softball team, Miss MHB pageant girls, Ministry Leadership Council, Freshmen Ministry and Reaching Out.” Raygoza said, “It was like a fall festival for the local kids; just to let the community know that someone cares about them.” “There were snow cones, hotdogs and popcorn,” said Coulson. “We also had face painting, a clown and a magician for the kids. There were also...

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‘Free meal’ not at Hardy, Weathersbee explains

By Byron Weathersbee, the Vice President for Student Life All of us are looking for a bargain. When I eat, I want the best food for the lowest price. Unfortunately, meal plans cannot be free. You know there is no such thing as a “free meal.” Double swiping ends up costing students more money. When a student purchases a meal plan, that plan is designed specifically to cover the cost of one college student. Sodexo is our food service company. They work with many universities across the nation. They are attempting to provide universities (students in particular) with the best quality for the lowest price. If not, there are other companies competing to gain your business. In an “all you care to eat” meal plan that has multiple options, a food service company uses a complex formula to determine the cost per meal. It is based on one person eating all they care to eat in a given week … not two people. If they allowed double swiping, it would cause cost to increase because two people will eat much more food than one in any given week. For example, my family cannot have one insurance policy to cover both my car and my wife’s car. The formula is based on two cars being on the road. The more cars that are insured by that company, then the  cost of insurance actually goes down per car. Your meal plan was set based on the fact that one person would be eating during a week. If you want to get the most for your money, then eat all of your meals. Second, in years past Sodexo and the kind food service staff has graciously allowed students to swipe for a friend who “forgot” their card. This was becoming more frequent and some students began to take advantage of the situation. Then students figured out ways to double swipe and get a great meal without having to pay – because after for, right?” No, what has been paid for on that meal plan is the weekly food cost for one student – not two. Keep in mind that UMHB’s meal plans are considerably less than other universities’. Let’s keep it that way. Next time you invite a friend that does not have a use your Crusader Bucks to cover their cost. When you buy a meal, it creates real community. The administration is constantly evaluating food service to best serve you. We could change the plan to allow for double swiping for a friend, but your cost would increase. We are currently considering “guest passes” that would allow you to bring...

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