Harvey affects UMHB community
Aug31

Harvey affects UMHB community

A prayer vigil was held for students and faculty affected by Hurricane Harvey this last Tuesday evening at Luther Memorial on the UMHB campus in Belton. The university and local community of Belton and Bell County have been affected by Hurricane Harvey after it hit the Texas shore four miles east of Rockport as a category 4 hurricane with winds reaching up to 130 miles, on Friday, August 25, at 9:45 p.m. It retreated only to return and hit land once again that midnight as a category 3, at the northeastern shore of Copano Bay. Harvey brought record amounts of rain to other areas, dumping more water than Hurricane Katrina, Sandy, and Andrew combined. Over 50 inches of rain has been dumped on the state of Texas, and Governor Greg Abbott declared 54 counties as a state of disaster. Many people found themselves stranded on the roofs of their homes, and had to be rescued by boat. Hurricane Harvey, currently classified as a tropical depression, is expected to drift to the Gulf of Mexico before moving northeast towards Louisiana and Arkansas by Sat., Sept. 2. Senior public relations major Lynsey May, who is from Kingwood, TX, said that her family was forced to evacuate due to the rising waters. Although the waters have begun to recede, when we spoke with May on Monday, water levels in her home were still rising. “The water has reached the inside of my house that is seven feet off the ground,” she said. “It has affected my family’s business and forced us to not only evacuate ourselves but our 29 horses, as well.” May worries that her home may not be there when the waters finally recede. “We laid every brick of our barn. We nailed every screw in. We danced on the floors of our house when we were building it. The memories will always be there, but the actual place that I call home might not be there.” Senior public relations major Paige Mareth, who is from Victoria, TX, said that her parents chose to remain at her childhood home and weather the storm. “They’re without water and electricity and it may be that way for a while,” she said. Mareth said that although it’s been an emotional week, she is thankful that her home sustained minimal damage. “Not everyone else in my little city was as fortunate, and that’s hard to know,” she said. Hurricane Harvey evacuees began arriving from Brazoria County to Bell County early Monday morning. They were first transported to the Expo Center, where they were given dry clothes and shoes, and then they were taken to shelters...

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Unique summer internships provide students with meaningful experiences
Aug23

Unique summer internships provide students with meaningful experiences

For many, summer is a time to relax, hang out with friends, and perhaps most importantly, have a job to pay for college or gain experience for future employment. Internships are a great way to gain insight about the world and showcase skills that are needed in various places. They can also help you understand more about your intended major and prepare you for a fulfilling career. Numerous students at the university had the opportunity this summer to use their talents to serve God by being interns. Jordyn Brinkman, a sophomore interdisciplinary major, knows this firsthand. “My internship this summer was at a church. The Lakeway church to be specific,” she said. “While there, I worked in the children’s ministry department.” Brinkman had a variety of duties, such as prepping and working for Vacation Bible School, leading a group of kids at a four-day camp in Denton, Texas called Camp Kid Jam, and planning and organizing events for the department. The work was rewarding because of the relationships she made with her co-workers and the children at the church. “I just really enjoyed being in the presence of children throughout the summer. In the future, I want to be a teacher, so children are my passion.” Brinkman said. Not only did she form relationships, but she also grew as an individual, preparing her for the road to becoming a teacher and leader. “I felt like I improved on patience the most. Children, although brilliant, really know how to test you sometimes,” Brinkman said. “I think that the most valuable thing I learned this summer was leadership as well as being a team player.” “There were three other interns that I worked with this summer who taught me how to communicate and work together to achieve the same goal. The kids pushed me to step out of my comfort zone and lead them not only in their daily activities, but also in their walk with God.” Samuel Kinnin, a junior Christian studies/public relations major, had a gratifying internship experience as well. He worked with Impact Student Ministries, a national Pentecostal organization that helps children grow in their walk with Christ. “I went to church camps with a team to speak, lead games, and sometimes served as a counselor.” Kinnin said. “I also was constantly posting on social media and created a blog to share the internship with people all over the world.” Kinnin was able to spread God’s Word to many people, as he traveled to six states and met with individuals who needed to hear about Jesus’ love. “God worked wonders in the lives of so many,” Kinnin said....

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Welcome Week 2017
Aug23

Welcome Week 2017

Every year, freshmen get the opportunity to move in the week before classes to experience Welcome Week. During Welcome Week, students take part in the Spirit and Traditions rally, where they learn about UMHB traditions, and have an opportunity to run onto the field at Crusader Stadium. Welcome Week participants also compete in Color Games, and they are introduced to different organizations on campus at the Student Organization Fair. At the end of the week, students are dubbed ‘Crusaders for Life’ in candlelight at Luther Memorial. See photo gallery for more Welcome Week...

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Photography exhibit gives budding artists hands-on experience
Apr26

Photography exhibit gives budding artists hands-on experience

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Townsend Memorial Library is hosting a new kind of exhibit that will last through the end of the year in honor of Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, which is celebrated April 30. The exhibit displays works of art created through pinhole photography, which professor John Hancock’s Photography 2 class is learning. “Pinhole photography uses a pinhole camera, or a camera obscura,” he said. “A camera obscura is basically a lightproof box with a small hole, or aperture, in it.” The lightproof box houses a piece of photo paper, which is light sensitive and records what the small hole sees, just like the eye does.” “After the paper is exposed, we take it to the dark room and develop it with chemicals using a wet darkroom technique. The image results in a negative photo, so we have to develop it twice to get an image.” This is Hancock’s first semester teaching in-depth pinhole photography. Although this technique of photography has been mentioned before in his classes, this semester’s students experienced the whole process, from building the cameras themselves to developing and hanging the images in the library. “We built [the pinhole cameras] in class as a part of a hands-on, student-based learning exercise. I think student-centered learning is far more effective than lecturing.” Besides the perk of avoiding lecturing, Hancock also enjoys the environment that is created through the process of developing the images. “I like that we’re able to bring in a classroom community that works together and helps each other. It was more of a community of just creating without worrying about the outcome of a grade.” Hancock jokingly said that his biggest goal for the semester was for his students to “have fun making art and wasting materials.” But he added that his actual desire was to teach his students to “take control of stealing light and time; taking [coal] and turning it into a diamond.” “Learning about the process and learning to appreciate it was my biggest takeaway,” said senior graphic design major, Kameryn Boggess. “We’re so used to snapping photos over and over, and just taking it again if we don’t like it.” “I’ve enjoyed [learning pinhole photography] immensely, but it definitely took a lot of patience,” she said. Though all parts of the pinhole photography process were fascinating to the class, Hancock’s favorite part is the hands-on aspect that developing photos in the darkroom demands. “As nerdy as it sounds, it kind of feels like alchemy; magic in the dark. It has a zen, soothing quality to it, with the running water and the red...

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Midnight March tradition continues
Apr26

Midnight March tradition continues

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Charter Day is a campus tradition that celebrates the history and heritage of the university and commemorates the initial signing of the school’s charter on February 1, 1845. It is usually celebrated on the first Wednesday of each February. Sophomores ring the sophomore bell and seniors place a wreath at the grave of Judge R.E.B. Baylor located in Heritage Plaza. The school recently celebrated the 172nd year since being chartered in 1845. This year, the school spiced things up by having a charter weekend on Friday April 21 and Saturday April 22. Many events were held on campus to celebrate the occasion, which included a Heritage Club tea and reception, a dinner and floral presentation, multiple club reunions, and the Midnight March and robing ceremony. The school even provided campus tours for visiting alumni to see how much the school has grown. A dinner and floral presentation were held on Friday to honor the first ladies of UMHB. 1975 graduate Norman Northen presented original floral arrangements while telling heartfelt stories of the first ladies. The dinner also included a display of seven dresses, each owned by a first lady of UMHB. Jim and Caroline Cope met at UMHB and attended the weekend events. Caroline attended UMHB from 1963-1967 and Jim met her in ’63 before moving to Howard Payne. They attended the Charter Day festivities not only to celebrate the school’s founding, but also their 50th anniversary. Jim Cope studied PE with a biology minor here before he transferred, and Caroline studied Home Economics. “A lot has changed since we were students,” Jim Cope said. “There were only around ten buildings on campus when we were here.” Caroline’s class was the first to graduate from Walton Chapel after the original chapel burned down, and they were also the first people to see the construction of Getty’s Hall completed. “We really enjoyed the dinner and floral presentation, the chapel service, and the reunion events,” Caroline Cope said. Friday festivities also included the traditional Midnight March and robing ceremony that is an opportunity for students to honor their friendships with each other and exhibit their loyalty to the university. During the week prior, seniors give candles to special friends and invite them to attend the event. The robing ceremony symbolizes the passing of the student leadership from the senior class to the junior class. Seniors place their caps and gowns on the juniors, and this is the first time the juniors can sing the alumni/senior song, “Up with the Purple.” Rumored to have started in 1902, this tradition is a highlight...

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Sharing the Gospel: students perform Easter Pageant for 78th time
Apr26

Sharing the Gospel: students perform Easter Pageant for 78th time

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells “It is finished.” A crowd of students dressed in Biblical apparel cheer as Jesus’ last words on the cross are spoken, while a tearful audience of community members watch as the Gospel comes to life before their eyes. On Wednesday April 12, UMHB students took the stage for the 78th time to perform the Easter Pageant for friends, family and local residents at 12:30, 3 and 5:30 p.m. at Luther Memorial. This year, the Campus Activities Board broadcasted the 12:30 and 3 p.m. performances live on Facebook, so the students were able to literally perform the story of the Gospel to the whole world. University President Randy O’Rear chose senior public relations and music major Jacob Asmussen to play the role of Jesus, and he chose senior cellular biology major Sophie Rivera to portray Mary. Senior Christian studies major Maddie Rarick directed this year’s pageant. Asmussen chose those who portrayed his disciples, and he took careful consideration to pick a diverse group of men just as Jesus did. “I wanted guys who I really thought could benefit from the experience and really get something out of it. So I got a mix of friends and people I didn’t know as well, so it ended up being a patchwork of guys that really became a brotherhood.” Rarick and her assistant directors chose who portrayed the rest of the named roles such as Jarius and his wife, the bride and groom, Barabas, Pilate, and others. The crowd consisted of any student who was interested in being a part of Easter Pageant. Asmussen said that during this time he learned who he was in Christ. “It was a lot of growth in my own personal life with my relationship with Jesus and what I believe and really becoming who He’s created me to be,” he said. Senior business management major Caleb Latson, who portrayed the disciple Peter, enjoyed the time leading up to the Easter Pageant and working with Asmussen. “Jacob’s one of my closet friends , and that made it super easy to just relax and have fun during practice. At first it took some time for all the disciples to get comfortable around each other, but it didn’t take too long before we were all really good friends.” Asmussen said the actual day of the performance was exhausting, but he enjoyed it. “Each show had a different feel to it; something I learned from it. I was really thinking a lot that day about who Jesus is and who He is to me, and it was a very powerful day...

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