Library turns 50, celebrates with display

By Terryn Kelly The month of September marked the 50th anniversary of the Townsend Memorial  Library  serving the campus. It has come a long way since its first $10,000 temporary frame structure was built. Professor and Director of Learning Resources Denise Karimkhani joined the staff in 1977 and has seen many changes within the library throughout her career. The methods of how information could be found in the library were different when she first arrived. “When I started here, there were just a limited number of books we had to assist students. You knew the books that you had, and you went to those books time after time. Now there is so much information and we have about 100 databases,” she said. Professor and Librarian Dorothy Planas has been here for 12 years. Although she does prefer that some things still be done in print or by hand, she appreciates the technological advances that have helped make her job easier in different aspects. “We are doing a lot more things electronically than we did before. We do still hand out paper surveys, but we do our tallying by computer. We can actually log in all the results into the system,” she said. “Now, I don’t have to tally manually. I used to have to do it by hand, so that part has gotten easier.” Beginning her eighth year as Head of Public Services Librarian, Anne Price has seen Townsend make modifications both physically and technologically through the years.  She said, “The way in which information is stored these days is different. We used to have a lot of microfiche upstairs. Cabinets were full of it, and we eventually got rid of all of them. We now have much more study space upstairs to use.” Students and faculty are now able to stay connected to the library without having to be there in person. “We see more and more people in here physically studying, but we also see many through the computers, meaning we can see them online accessing our databases, and this is something that has changed drastically since I have been here,” Price said. The library is always trying to keep up with the changing pace of technology and the world, and with that comes more responsibility. Price said, “I have more to do. My job has changed a lot since I first started working here, and it is a little bit harder. I was basically making signs at first. Now, I am making maps and videos.” The library not only serves as a home for books, but also as a tool for different types of research and...

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Seniors take home the title

Walton Chapel was packed last Friday night with alumni, parents and students who were watching Stunt Night. The theme this year was reality TV,  so performances paid homage to many popular shows including American Idol, Survivor, Minute to Win It and So You Think You Can Dance. Director of Stunt Night senior education major Shaina Ryan said, “I know that everyone on campus watches reality TV even if we won’t admit it. It is just something we can have a good time making fun of. It is fun, and it’s light.” Having won three out of the last four years, it was no surprise that the coveted Judges’ Choice Award went to the seniors. Their performance included returning senior nursing major Andrew Kester, who during the skit even poked fun at his fifth year senior status. “It feels really good to win. It is a little different working with a different class. The difference is that the directors lined everything perfectly up for us. This is my last stunt night,” Kester said. “I’m going to miss it. It has been one of my absolute favorite things at UMHB.” Senior exercise and sport science major Seth Dickinson played the lovelorn Hispanic producer Antonio who falls first for the bride at one point in the performance and then at the end for her acting coach. He won the Best Actor Award for his performance. Dickinson said, “We just weren’t feeling the lines. I did one of the lines in a Spanish accent one time and thought that this could work. I kind of just practiced it and felt like my character needed this Latin flair. I really enjoyed it. Being my last year and all, to win best actor just makes it extra special.” Senior English major Jacqueline Findley won Best Actress for her role as the bride. Although the sophomore class did not place, their parody of Survivor provided the crowd with  laughs. The freshman class performed exceptionally well, in spite of having the disadvantage of only a few weeks to get to know each other. They won the Campus Choice Award and Best Costume . One of the freshman directors, special education major Dawn Partain said, “The hardest challenge was having so many people. We ended up putting about 40 people on stage. At the end, they started playing music, and our class went down in the aisle and started dancing. That is just how our class is. We just get together, dance and have fun.” Their performance was a retelling of A Christmas Carol. The three ghosts of Stunt Night past, present and future were Judge Baylor, Shawn Shannon...

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Pop culture opens doors for discussion

Thursday — just another day of the week. But now, UMHB alumnus and college minister at First Baptist Church in Belton Grant Hickman, is turning it into an opportunity to help engage students in what’s going on in the world, with hopes that they will begin to look at culture through a biblical perspective. The event, simply called “Thursdays,” is held at FBC’s college house. Each week, Hickman presents something from the media- a music video, TV show, advertisement or a topic from culture, and then opens it up for discussion among students. The idea came last year after Hickman viewed a Lady Gaga video, “Born This Way”. “I watched it and was appalled but at the same time amazed at how well it was made. But I looked at the message she was portraying, and it got me kind of thinking about it,” he said. Hickman decided to show the video to a group of his interns, wanting to see their thoughts on it. “I just kind of took a chance and said,  ‘OK, interns, we’re going to watch this, and it may offend some of you and it’s probably going to make you feel uncomfortable and awkward, but I want us to watch it and talk about it, and we did,” he said. “I saw light bulbs clicking, and I saw fruit from it, as odd as that sounds.” Hickman believes that there is a divide between Christians wanting to maintain Biblical standards while also relating to the world that they live in. “I think a lot of us who have grown up in the church are taught to just not be a part of it at all. We’re not balancing well between the grace and the call to righteousness that we’re in,” he said. The plan for the event is to bring people together to figure out how the two relate, and see meaning behind what’s in American media. “My goal with Thursdays is that it would be a place where students can come from different walks of life, and with different perspectives, and we can watch a TV show, or music video, and just talk about the message of it,” Hickman said. Junior social work major Kristen Kimmel has enjoyed being a part of the discussions on Thursday nights, and like Hickman, wants it to be a time of finding balance between culture and Christianity. “A lot of people think you have to be a Christian, or you’re involved in the world,  and I think we’re called to do both,” she said. “Hopefully it shows us that we can be involved in the world but...

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Club brings Christ to students in Texas

A party with a purpose. That’s what the organization Young Life offers to high school and college students each week at a meeting they call Club. The goal is to meet people where they are at and show them what it means to really love Christ. Area director for Mid-TX Young Life Paul Walker was working in youth ministry in Wichita Falls, Texas, when he realized that he wanted to work with young people at UMHB. “We’re trying to reach kids who are lost, are not believers, a lot of which have never been to church or don’t go to church on a regular basis. So they’re not in a place where they are ready to be discipled.They still need to hear the gospel,” he said. Walker is passionate about reaching out to those types of students because he was one of them in high school and still remembers the difference that Young Life made for him. He said, “I went to Club, realized a lot of my friends were there, had a lot of fun when I was there and I met my YL leader there. … Then I was involved in Young Life the rest of high school, my sophomore, junior and senior years in high school.” Now the director for the Bell County branch of the organization, he oversees all ministry activities that happen during the year. “Weekly we have campaigners, which is a small group Bible study, and each leader is assigned a grade and a gender. Our Monday Club would be like a mid week youth meeting for a regular church,” Walker said. Young Life only meets during the school year, but they try to stay involved after the semester ends. “We have what we call camp and that’s one week in the summer. We take kids to a camp and what we tell them is going to be the best week of their life. And for many of them, they come back and say it was,” he said. Many of the leaders for the Mid-TX group are UMHB students. They participate in all the weekly activities, as well as do one-on-one contact work, where they invest time into building relationships with their students. Sophomore sport management major Esther Gibbs is a leader for the Young Life college group. Like Walker, she decided to be involved with the organization because of the effect it had on her while she was in high school. “I enjoy being part of it because Young Life has changed my life a lot, and I enjoy giving back what was given to me,” she said. The college group meets...

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Campolo encourages faith-based service

By Katie Maze Internationally acclaimed minister and author Dr. Tony Campolo urged students in chapel on Sept. 14 to adopt a needy child from a foreign country. Campolo is founder and president of the Evangelical Association for the Promotion of Education and has devoted his life to establishing schools and providing aid for developing countries.  He is professor emeritus of sociology at Eastern Univeristy in St. Davids, Penn. He previously served for ten years on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania.He is a graduate of Eastern College and earned a Ph.D. from Temple University.  He is the author of 38 books and an ordained minister.  Campolo was inspired to begin his ministry on a trip to the Dominican Republic in the mid-sixties. There he became aware of the vast number of children sleeping in the streets and dying of starvation and other preventable causes. He returned home to the United States and immediately began work raising money to establish a university for the people within the country. Junior nursing major Heather Nichols, who attended the chapel presentation, said, “He woke me up and made me realize that there are a lot of things that you normally don’t think about as we carry on with our everyday lives.” Nichols and her roommate, sophomore English major Sarah Norrell, said they were inspired to form a group to share the expense of adopting a child before they graduate. “Transform yourselves from worldly machines into godly instruments of change” were Campolo’s words as he urged students to take an active role in making the world a more godly place by caring for those who struggle to live a fulfilled life in the slums of poverty. His mission statement, derived from the Gospel of Matthew, says, “Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me.” Campolo presented an array of illustrations and personal experiences that conveyed his desire to provide for oppressed children in the world. He centered on one specific theme: are we taking the Word of Christ seriously?  He spoke honestly to Christians, forcing them to consider how their lives would change if they took the words of Jesus literally and laid down their possessions to become slaves in service. Using the teachings of Jesus, Campolo urged students to sacrifice their money to care for and possibly save the life of a child in an impoverished country. He challenged Christians to act on their faith by making small sacrifices in their lives in order to fulfill their ultimate responsibility to God by loving and serving others who are living in oppression and poverty. ...

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Peace Day celebration to be held

Wednesday, Sept. 21 marks a day of cease-fire, both personal and political. Back in 1982, the U.N. established Peace Day in order to help make peace in relationships as well as in conflicts of the world. The BSM and UMHB art department are doing their small part of acknowledging the International Day of Peace by hosting a service in Manning Chapel at 5:15 p.m. tomorrow. One Voice, directed by Matthew Crosby, will perform. Dr. Jessica Hooten, assistant professor of English, will recite a reading and Dr. Shawn Shannon, director of the BSM, will lead a prayer. In preparation for this event, hand-painted pinwheels have been placed in the flower beds in front of the library. This is the university’s third year to participate in the peace project. Professor of art and co-organizer of Peace Day Helen Kwiatkowski helped initiate the Peace Day on campus as well as an off-campus festival. “It will be a way of offering our private hopes and collective prayers for peace,” she said. The art for peace festival  was created three years ago in order to raise money for the Children’s Advocacy Center of Belton by selling pinwheels. The third annual festival for the community was held Sept. 10 at Cedarbrake Retreat Center in Belton. The festival consisted of live entertainment, poetry readings, home-made snacks and the opportunity to purchase one of the hand-crafted pinwheels. Among the live music performed for the festival was one of Kwiatkowski’s good friends. Singer/song writer and entertainer Emily Kaitz said, “It was just overwhelming especially for this area. She has continued to do this…. I am very happy to be part of this.”  Senior fine arts major, Lauren Cross enjoys helping with the event. “This is the third annual Peace Day (for UMHB), and I’ve helped with all of them. Helen Kwiatkowski holds the festival every year and from the kindness in her heart, she takes time out of her own life and her own day to raise money for the Children’s Advocacy Center of Belton. The T-shirts were made by Pat Seals, and all the money goes straight to the kids to support them and to help them in whatever they need.” The Children’s Advocacy Center provides comprehensive services to enhance the quality of life for abused and neglected children ages 3-17 in Central Texas. Senior studio art and Spanish double major Ellen Buhrow realizes the importance of being at peace locally. “Normally, people think of war and peace, but (what)we’re doing here is more of a local peace. We’re helping kids who have really hard lives, so this goes towards helping them being able to have more...

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