Male nurses learn to defy stereotypes

Men in the nursing field know how it feels to be the odd man out. After hearing some opinions from men in the nursing program, it is evident that it’s impossible to ignore the majority of women in nursing compared to men in the field. Junior nursing major Corbin Winkle explains the first time he experienced any tension in the nursing field with female classmates was during a viewing of a film called Perry Care.  The movie was an instructional  video on how to clean patients and administer care. Winkle said, “Having to watch that with girls on either side of me was pretty awkward. It’s a bit shocking. It goes away after a while, though.” Winkle also said he is one of only two or three other guys in most of his nursing classes, and several people call him and his fellow male nursing mates “murses.” The days of nurses being pretty girls in white dresses are quite over. The degree for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing is for both sexes. There isn’t a B.S. in Male Nursing. However, some may wish that there were. Junior nursing major Dan Black said, “A struggle is that you’re entering into a profession that has been dominated by women for many, many years. Currently there are about three million registered nurses in the United States and only about 6.2 percent are male, so that’s kind of what we’re going up against.” He said male nurses  bring great qualities to the table in the nursing field. “You’re going to get a lot of patients that aren’t exactly … light. Some men view this as bad because they feel that they’re the muscle in the job, but if I can help a fellow co-worker, then I’ll do that.” Many male nurses easily adapt to being around a large number of women because they all share a common goal  they are jointly working to achieve. Though they may come from different perspectives, it is still the same goal. Black said, “We take care of the patient not only physically, but we look at them as  needing holistic care, who they are and how they feel.” Black discuss the different mentalities both female and males bring to the field of nursing. “We do a lot of psychology with that. So the job description is the same, but men and women are just different, so, yes, we have the same job description, but sometimes I’m going to approach a situation differently just because I’m a male,” he said. One nursing student seems to run into the occasional problem of not even being identified as a...

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Writer’s Festival inspires more than poetry

The 2012 Writer’s Festival brought authors from all around the country together. Combining poetry, prose and art, the festival ran Feb. 9-11  and featured celebrated authors such as Dan Taylor, Brett Foster and Susanna Childress as well as student authors. Assistant Professor of English Dr. Jessica Hooten spearheaded the festival and expected it to have a positive impact on students and others who attended. “I was hoping that students would be exposed to great writing, that their assumptions about literature may be overturned, and that perhaps they would be inspired by the beauty of poetry,” she said. Hooten was pleased with the outcome of the festival but hopes future festivals will get more recognition and support. She said, “I think UMHB has a larger opportunity with the festival than they realize. Thankfully, some professors recognized the value of the festival and brought whole classes. However, every department across campus should be coming. The auditorium should be filled at every session, and we should have students in awe of what they have just experienced.” Junior English major Courtney Kirk is one of those crusaders that describes what Hooten  wished. She attended and  was amazed with keynote speaker. “I did hear Dr. Al Haley’s work, and I thought it was pretty exceptional. I really liked his work a great deal. It was vivid; it was full of imagery. I could understand it; it wasn’t elevated speech. It was full of drama, and it wasn’t stilted. I liked it a lot,” she said. Kirk was also impressed with Haley’s humbleness and the realness his work represented. She described the authenticity of his performance. “Even though this is a Christian setting, he didn’t pull any punches. He told it how it is. He talked about everyday situations, and I can appreciate that,” she said. “Another thing was his address, his approach to reading his work; it was    exceptional.” Kirk hopes the festivals in years to come will expand and not just focus on a few genres of writing. “If you’re trying to produce writers, great writers, you have to realize that everyone is not going to write in that genre of Christian works. Everyone is not geared up on that,” Kirk said. “So we need to have different writer styles, and I think that needs to be pushed. I think that would really help the     students.” Laughter filled the room on opening night of the festival as professors, students and guests of the campus took their turn and expressed themselves with poetry and scripts during Open Mic Night. Hooten said, “Sharing poetry, songs and prose pieces used to be common; now we have...

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Crusader Knights become Heartthrobs
Feb21

Crusader Knights become Heartthrobs

Since the first week of the spring semester, 21 men have been working hard for the weekend of Feb. 17 and 18. It marked the Crusader Knights show, which is a parody of the Miss MHB Pageant that happens annually each fall. The time and effort  the contestants put in have been considerable and was clear to see on both Friday and Saturday nights. “We have been practicing ever since the very first day of this semester and have practiced every Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings, totaling nine hours a week, plus any outside practice the guys did on their own,” junior Christian missions major and director of Crusader Knights Ryan Murphy said. “However, my assistant directors and I have been working on and planning this show since last April. There is definitely a lot of time and effort that has gone into this show.” Contestants represent different organizations, classifications and places on campus. All 21  men were required to create a short video, learn two group dances, create a small group dance, strut on stage, and, as a new addition this year, have personal interviews with the three judges. Last year, Murphy was a contestant. His previous participation helped him to know how to be the best director he could this year. “My experience being in Cru Knights definitely helped me when it came to planning this event. As a contestant, you get a pretty good handle on the whole process, so with my knowledge and first hand experience as a contestant last year, it  has helped tremendously with directing this event,” Murphy said. The adviser is Director of Student Organizations Tiffany Wurdemann. She has enjoyed working with Murphy and knows he was a good fit for the position. “Ryan has been phenomenal as a director. I can’t tell him enough how well he has done at orchestrating everything,” she said. The theme for the 2012 contest was Heartthrobs. Each contestant chose his  own Heartthrob and then portrayed that person in his video. Along with the top five contestants being named, specialty awards were also given out. Best Strut was awarded to sophomore mass communication/journalism major Christian Hernandez. Best interview went to junior criminal justice major Taylor Holleyman. Junior Christian studies major Jon Michael Toler won the Judge’s choice video. Last year’s winner of Cru Knights, senior mass communication/public relations major Brett Land, gave his crown to Mr. Junior Class and Christian ministries major Ryan Klopack, who also won the campus choice video award. Klopack was estatic about winning and being able to set a great example like previous winners. “It’s an absolute honor and privilege to win...

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Spiritual hymn has a deeper meaning

A good song always tells a story. Dr. George Harrison, director of Digital Media Services/ Cultural Affairs,gave a presentation telling the story of the spiritual hymn “Glory Glory Hallelujah.” The Feb. 9 College of Christian Studies forum, which recognized Black History month, revealed the song was composed by slaves and each word held a significant meaning. Harrison said, “There are a few that know the origin and the background of the story. This is a song sung by slaves that witnessed. It is an announcement to fellow slaves and to slave owners professing that I’m no longer what I was. They have laid down their burdens and decided to become a Christian. This is a total commitment to my new God.” Harrison, who has studied most church development in the black community and African gods, dissected and explained each verse in detail. The words , “I feel better, so much better, since I laid my burden down,” was a request from one slave to another to convert to Christianity. “This is an invitation to others saying you need to come to Christ, and you need to be a part of what I’m part of. And other slaves watched those slaves that claim to be saved to see if their lives change. So you had to be appealing and you had to do things that were good and kind,” Harrison explained. The third verse, “My friends don’t treat me like they used to since I lay my burdens down,” showed evidence of how other slaves treated those who chose God over the African gods. “This is a fight between two different opposing groups, Christians and non-Christians,” he said. Harrison said many of the tests that slaves faced when they liberated themselves from their African tribal gods, are the same tests Christians face today. “It was a statement of new birth confronting all belief once held so closely to them. Kind of sounds like our lives. Sometimes, we always want to go back to what we’re used to, and it’s difficult to make the decision to put something away and to gain something. This type of disciple power has changed the life of many.” Harrison extended his lecture from slavery to the present. Covering issues such as segregation of schools in the South, the Voting Rights Act and the civil rights movement. The topic changed during a discussion period. Mike Bergman, executive director of the non-profit organization, Helping Hands said, “We’re some 50 years plus past the civil rights movement, and we still hear this statement that 11 o’clock on Sunday morning is the most segregated hour in our country. What...

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How to handle a bad living experience

For most students, college is the time when you move out on your own and share a small amount of space with a complete stranger. Why is it that some people just can’t seem to get along with the person that they are temporarily living with? Many students blame the housing process, stating that there just isn’t enough information asked in order to get the perfect match for them. Freshman nursing major Denise Schneider has been rooming with the same person since the start of the fall semester. Her roommate experience has been great so far, and she thinks that others might not be truly  answering the housing questionnaire to the best of their ability. “I think it’s very important that when you’re doing your questionnaire to be truthful and honest. That way you can kind of eliminate some things,” she said. Resident Director Sarah Hammond offers her recommendation when it comes to discussing problems with a house mate. “My biggest advice would be always communicate as openly and clearly as you can. I know a lot of people keep things to themselves and they don’t want to talk about things. They avoid conflict,” she said. Hearing about others having a fight or two with their roommate may scare away some people, but not all students who have decided that it was best to switch roommates think that there is no hope for dorm life. Freshman exercise science pre-physical therapy major Shirley Chan has some advice for first-time college students just now entering the dorms. “I think that if there’s a possibility for them to get to know each other prior to moving in together. I would highly recommend it. Just so the two of you can get to know each other a little bit better and set some ground rules,” she said. It’s understood that some cases cannot be fixed with a mere conversation between two people. However, many students complain about the little things that their roommates do. Such as snoring or throwing a piece of paper on the floor. Hammond believes that students shouldn’t be so worried about the small things and start to live life based on what’s really important to them. “I think we live in a society that is all about me. We want everything for ourselves. We want the best experience for ourselves. We want the best things for ourselves. We think we deserve the best. We just get caught up in complaining, like maybe this isn’t exactly what I wanted …. Well, make the most of it,” she said. She continued to express her opinion about trying to  make the most...

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University alumni go political
Feb21

University alumni go political

From competing for UMHB student body president in Spring 2009 to now the real deal, alumni Garrett Smith and Tommy Wilson are using their political savvy to work together and promote local Republican candidate, Wes Riddle. Riddle is campaigning to be the U.S. representative for district 25 in Congress. The former college professor, small business owner and military man is now taking on politics. When Riddle first began his campaign bid in July, he was looking for about several volunteers. However, his problem throughout was that people kept quitting. Riddle believed that Smith was a godsend because he arrived just when the former volunteer coordinator left. Wilson entered campaign work based on a recommendation from his former student body president competitor, Smith. Because there was so much work to be done for just one person, Riddle hired Wilson to be a field representative based on Smith’s advice. He was impressed with the alumni’s knowledge of politics and thankful for their hard work. He said, “The two of them together have done more in the few months they’ve been here than others have been able to do in the period of six months or more. If they are in any way a representation of UMHB, it speaks very highly of that institution.” Because of Smith’s and Wilson’s efforts, what seemed an impossible task to make Riddle an official candidate became possible. It was assumed that Riddle would not have enough signatures to enter the race, but the former students and several others proved that notion wrong. Smith said, “We’ve been surprising people the whole way. The Republican Party was just astonished … We’re by far taking the lead on grass roots ground game.” There are several reasons why Smith firmly stands by the candidate. Smith said he is a strong believer in Christ and is not afraid to voice his concerns. And is not the stereotypical politician who beats around the bush. Wilson said, “That’s what I love about Wes. He will never back down or apologize for his views … We’ve seen his plan. We can offer answers.” For students who question whether their vote truly does make an impact or find no reason for to vote, Wilson offers a perspective. “If we’re not in those discussions, if we’re not in that process of making those rules … by talking to our representative … these decisions will be made without our input.” Wilson suggests a great way for students to start is by voicing their beliefs and opinions through the university’s student government. He said, “We have a great place at UMHB. But (students) need to start speaking about...

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