Revival unites students
Apr20

Revival unites students

The very essence of UMHB’s Spring Revival is praise and worship of God. Each year, hundreds of students gather in the quad for three days to fellowship and worship together. This year, the band Digital Age was back for their third time, and Dr. Kneeland Brown was there cracking jokes and ministering to all who came to participate in the annual event. The event is student led, and draws in not only those seeking out the event, but also people walking by. Spring revival comes just days after the university’s Easter Pageant and helps students reflect on what Jesus did for us. It’s a time to praise and worship, and come together as one body of Christ. The Digital Age was happy to be a part of Revival, and helped to set the tone for the entire event. “We don’t typically do things more than a year or two, and they asked us again, and we were like ‘Of course we’re going to do it, cause we love you guys. We really do,’” said Mike Dodson, the group’s piano player. Guitarist Mark Waldrop (Shark) also had positive things to say about the event. “Everyone we’ve met here has been awesome, we have a lot of friends from Baylor who are here now, and it’s just awesome to sleep in our own beds and come down here,” he said. The band hails from Waco, where they first formed. But it wasn’t just the band who enjoyed the event that took place under a tent. Those who helped plan Revival were also moved by its worship-centered vibes. “One of my favorite aspects of the event was just getting to work with the committee.” aid Kelsey Riegel, junior history major. “Every single one of them had different stories, but they were all so on fire for the Lord and that was so evident through the whole Revival process. Getting to hear how they were telling their family and friends about the event, and getting to share the gospel with them was just incredibly uplifting,” Riegel said for her, the best part was that most of them were freshman and had never even been to UMHB’S Revival. “They didn’t know what it was going to look like when it all came together, so seeing them so excited and passionate for an event they’d never been to was so amazing and humbling,” she...

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Career Services prepares students for graduation
Feb16

Career Services prepares students for graduation

“Start Early, Be Prepared Get Noticed!” That’s exactly what Career Services can help graduating seniors do. College students are all here for the same thing; to get an education and gain experiences that will help them attain future jobs. Finding a job before graduation can be a difficult task, but with the help of UMHB’s Career Services, the process can be easier. Career Services helps students create resumes, make connections in the field they’re interested in, and assist seniors in finding full-time jobs directly out of college. “We feel career planning is a four-year activity and students need to take advantage of their college years to explore and confirm career paths,” said Don Owens, the director of Career services. Owens said that the four steps to succeed in finding a job are: completing an interest assessment as a freshman and then at the start of junior year, start your professional career resume right away, review it every month to add skills and experiences that will be required for field work, complete three different internships, and build connections and a network. Career Services offers workshops throughout the year in addition to eight job fairs: the Senior Etiquette Dinner, Speed Interview Events, Mock Interview Appointments, Employer Information Sessions, and Employer Campus Interview Days. The department also actively partners with the Belton Chamber of Commerce to aid in the Apprentice Belton Mentoring program, and the Alumni Association to bring the Fall Homecoming Alumni Career Connection BBQ. “We will also partner with the Social Work Program to host the first Social Work Expo on March 4 and with the Modern Foreign Languages Program for Spanish in the Marketplace roundtable.” Jobs offered through Career services include off-campus, part-time positions, internships, and full time jobs. These job opportunities could be anywhere from local, regional, statewide, national, or even international positions. “I’ve been multiple times and they’ve given me great advice. [Career Services] Made me feel more secure about getting into the field I’m going into,” said junior psychology major Scott Carter. Career Services offers a program called “Cru Connection” which is a university career management tool. Cru Connection is used to link students and alumni with employers. Owens suggests that students, if available, bring a current resume to the meeting, if they have one available. If students do not have a resume available, then the Career Services staff, will gladly assist the student in developing their professional resume. Career Services is located on the second floor of Mabee, room 202. They will take appointments or walk-ins. For more information, call 254-295-4691 or send an email to careerservices@umhb.edu. Students can also find the Career Services page...

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Students raise the curtain on new drama club
Feb16

Students raise the curtain on new drama club

The Crusader Company is one of the newest organizations on campus and was formed in the fall semester of 2015. The club hopes to help students prepare for work in show business. Whether students have experience or not, the club accepts them all. “We wanted to make the club because there was no drama club on campus,” said Danielle East, the club’s president. The purpose of Crusader Company is to help students gain knowledge of everything that would happen onstage or backstage, like using props, making costumes, creating a scene, and acting. The club will host workshops this semester to help students improve in a certain area and rehearse for upcoming plays. Club sponsor and supervisor Kathy Owens said the organization is a way for those interested in theatre to get their feet wet. “It will introduce them to the various tasks that theatre production require,” Owens said. “It will also allow like-minded individuals to bond over their shared love of theatre.” Owens likes the potential of the organization,” “It has the potential to be a wonderful force on campus,”she said. There will be many events this spring semester in which students can get involved. For their February fundraiser, the organization will be selling chocolate covered strawberries (two for a dollar) in the first floor of Bawcom on Friday, Feb. 12. The club will also be partnering with ROTC in March for a unique service project. Members of Crusader Company will pose as civilians, leaders, and military personnel during a training exercise put on by the ROTC. The opposing forces (played by the Crusader Company members) and the ROTC members will both be armed with paintball guns to simulate combat. The organization also plans to perform a small play for students and the community sometime during the semester. With the organization continuing to gain recognition, East said she has realized the need for such a club on campus. “I like how [Crusader Company] has gained a lot of feedback about how an organization like it needs to be on campus,” East said. The organization is currently meeting every other Monday in the Baugh Center for Visual Arts at 8...

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Helping Hands offers hope to Bell County
Feb16

Helping Hands offers hope to Bell County

lton Ministers Fellowship in 1995, Helping Hands has aided thousands of families who have fallen on hard times. Aid can be anything from groceries, items for new parents, financial help, and professional training, all at no cost to the participant. The executive director of the ministry, Rucker Preston, said it is important to have something like Helping Hands available in the community in order to solve social and economic problems that face the people of Belton, TX. “The reason we do what we do is because we believe Jesus meant what He said, so we are to follow His example and serve people in a very holistic way,” Preston said. “We do that through three different initiatives—relief, development, and advocacy.” Relief comes in the form of helping someone with their pressing physical needs like providing food, clothing, praying with them in the organization’s chapel, providing school supplies, or providing emergency needs for homeless families. “And then there’s development, which is where we work towards helping someone work their way out of poverty, save for the future to get a higher education, or find a job in our employment mentoring ministry,” Preston said. The director said it is also important for the organization and those who support it to be an advocate and a voice for the families who are trapped in poverty. Advocacy can come through talking to others about Helping Hands, providing donations, or volunteering at the organization. Senior social work major, Braden Wilson, said he chose the ministry to fulfill his internship requirements because of what they do for less fortunate families and the Kingdom of God. “I just love that Helping Hands is faith-based,” Wilson said. “[The organization] is supported by all different churches in the area who really work together to better the community.” Wilson also said that she likes Helping Hands’ holistic approach to helping each person who benefits from the ministry. “We ask them, is this helping? How can we improve this? What can we do better?” she said. “So, they really work for the clients.” Helping Hands is a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization, which means the services they provide are not funded by the government. They fund their charitable giving through a resale shop, donations from private donors, and monetary support from local churches. Senior social work major and Helping Hands intern, Michael Carpenter, said the work he’s done through the organization has not only helped needy families, but it has also helped him gain a unique perspective and experience that will help him in his future career. “I am a social work major and Helping Hands directly helped me by allowing...

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Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County
Jan28

Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County

The Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C. has presented the Bell County Museum with the opportunity to host the first traveling exhibit west of the Mississippi River. UMHB and the museum are partnering together to encourage students and residents of Belton to attend the exhibit. Dr. Timothy Crawford, the Dean of the College of Christian Studies brought the idea of hosting the exhibit to the museum’s curator, Beverly Headley. “We were honored to help out by bringing [the exhibit] to the UMHB community, the Bell County Museum, and the Belton area.” said Headley. “It’s a great reminder that we must study history. We need to understand not only what happened, but why it was allowed to happen. It raises fundamental issues about human nature, social responsibility and the obligation of individuals and institutions to act with a conscience in the face of unspeakable crimes.” The exhibit, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, discusses the medical and scientific studies of the Holocaust. This exhibit examines how the Nazi’s thought about genetics and used leadership and science to help justify persecution and murder. “This exhibit is a really good answer to the question why did the Holocaust happen?” Crawford said. “The terms ‘racially fit’ and ‘the cleansing of Germany’ was often used to explain to the German citizens why these atrocities were the right things to do.” The museum shows advertisements that were posted all around the country about how unethical it was for “racially fit Germans” to marry or procreate with “non-Germans.” And race wasn’t the only thing that Germany wanted to exterminate from family trees. Homosexuals, the handicapped, and the mentally ill were also considered to have “bad genetics.” A small number of artifacts are also located in the museum showing Nazi supporters personal items. “Deadly Medicine is a reminder that it has happened in the past and it is a history we should not repeat.” said. The exhibit is sectioned into two parts. On the first floor of the museum, guests can see sciences and experiments that took place before World War II began, focusing on creating the “perfect race.” Guests can also see the famous scientists that were used as inspiration for the experiments, such as Gregory Mendel and Charles Darwin, as well as the scientists that played important roles in the experiments, such as Dr. Ernst Rudin. There are many videos that play among the exhibit to show viewers what types of tools that were used, footage of results, and small biographies of different scientists. The second floor of the museum discusses what happened once World War II began. It depicts the victims of the illegal experiments,...

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Program connects students with career mentors
Jan28

Program connects students with career mentors

The Apprentice Belton program hosted their kickoff for the semester in Bawcom Student Union in the McLane Great Hall Jan. 21. The program is a partnership between Belton’s Chamber of Commerce and the university’s career center that provides mentors to students. Director of Career Services Don Owens and the chamber came to each other with the same idea about Apprentice Belton roughly four years ago when they heard about the Apprentice Austin program in Austin, TX. “It was certainly God’s being involved and us all being on the same page at the same time that made the program possible,” Owens said. Sophomore, junior and senior students must submit an application and a reference letter by mid-October to be considered for the program in the spring semester. Once a student applies, they will be contacted for an interview by the university and chamber. The university and the chamber then find mentors in each of the students’ chosen majors. Owens believes that students should be involved with this program so they can get a true feel for their profession before they walk across the stage. “I think students should apply to get a bird’s eye view of what it’s really like in that field,” Owens said. “A lot of us have these concepts of certain careers but we don’t realize it’s a lot of hard work. There’s the good, the bad, and the ugly of every job. There’s an old saying that says if you love what you do, you won’t have to work a day of your life. We want our students to have a passion and a calling for their career.” Thirteen students have been paired with professionals from the Belton and Temple area for this semester’s Apprentice Belton. The students will be required to meet with their mentor six times throughout the spring semester, whether it’s to discuss how the student’s semester is going over coffee or to shadow the professional on the job. At the end of April there will be a closing ceremony where participants will receive a certificate and they will be able to speak about their experience. “Through Apprentice Belton, I was able to gain a mentor in the medical field who has been able to help me navigate through my journey towards becoming a physician. While I also gained many hours of shadowing experience, what stood out to me more is the practical knowledge I gained through talking with Dr. Wooldridge about her experiences in the medical field,” said senior cell biology pre-med major and Apprentice Belton alumni Autumn Brewer. Junior BCIS major with a minor in Christian studies Ashli Adams is participating...

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