Students experience new side of Gospel while preparing for pageant
Mar29

Students experience new side of Gospel while preparing for pageant

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells What if you could be a part of a story that’s greater than yourself? It is a story so amazing, it has been passed down for around 2,000 years. It is a story of resurrection, salvation, and an everlasting love. The story is that of Jesus Christ’s life, death and resurrection, and the university puts on an annual pageant to portray these events. Students have participated in this tradition for the past 77 years, and will once again take the stage for the 78th time on Wed. April 12 at 12:30, 3, and 5:30 p.m. The Easter Pageant has been ingrained in UMHB culture and has become a huge community event. Hundreds of people from all around gather to view the Easter Pageant. The pageant is not only life-changing for those who watch it, but also for those who participate in the program. The director of the program, senior Christian studies major Maddie Rarick, has been involved with the Easter Pageant for two years. During her second year at the university, she helped Student Foundation transport alumni to a reception after each showing of the Easter Pageant. Last year, she co-led the costumes committee. Rarick says that everyone, regardless of what roll they play in the Easter Pageant, can learn something important from participating. “The beauty of being in the Easter Pageant is that you get to see the Gospel story from a different perspective,” Rarick said. “If you are a crowd person, you get to see the Gospel and Jesus from the perspective of the crowds that followed or despised Christ. If you’re on the props committee, you get to see what physical objects Jesus used, and thus see his humanity in new ways. If you’re the director, you get to see all those perspectives come to fruition in the minds and hearts of those in the Easter Pageant.” The director believes students should be involved with the Easter Pageant to see the Gospel in a new way and to be a part of a joyful tradition on campus. Franklin Groseclose, a junior Christian Studies major and assistant director of the Easter Pageant believes this year’s performance will be one of the best. “I think this year is going to be awesome. Every year God has given UMHB the gift of clear weather and this year has been no different,” Groseclose said. “As more and more people show interest I, as well as the other directors, become more and more excited. This portrayal of the death and resurrection of Jesus has touched so many, and I can’t wait...

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Spring  Revival: A chance for  ‘new  beginnings’
Mar29

Spring Revival: A chance for ‘new beginnings’

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Spring is here, everything is new and full of life. And this year’s Revival commitee is ready to boost students’ faith with this annual event April 3- 5 at 7 p.m. in the Quad. This three day event focuses on worship and helping people strengthen their spiritual lives. Revival also brings together an assortment of people from different social and religious backgrounds and gives them the opportunity to worship together. This year’s theme for Revival is “New Beginnings.” “We pray that no matter where you are in your walk of faith, even if you don’t have one, that you can have a new beginning with the Lord,” said sophomore education interdisciplinary studies major Sara Lindsey. Lindsey said the whole purpose of Revival is for people to feel welcomed and come closer to their Savior. “We really want everyone to feel accepted. Revival is for all people. We encourage students, staff, faculty, and people within the Belton community to come,” said sophomore Christian studies major Samuel Kinnin. This year the guest speaker will be Clint Paschell, and the band is the Robbie Seay Band. “We will enter a time of worship with the band followed by the speaker’s message pertaining to the topic of New Beginnings,” Kinnin said. “Following the message, we will split up and spread out into small groups and talk with one another about the things we heard and answer discussion questions.” Kinnin said small groups are a time to be open. Every single leader is here to encourage and uplift those who participate. “People can also feel free to pray with one of the steering committee members,” he said. “Revival will end with a closing prayer and a song” Revival Co-directors, Abigail Smith and Ashley Hastings, have spent many hours prepping for this event. They started the planning process last April. The rest of the steering committee began planning in November. This group of students has worked hard to make sure Revival is a success and many people feel refreshed in their faith. “The effects of Revival are amazing,” Lindsey said. “We start worshiping and you look around the tent and you see that God is so strong at Revival and that he is working through us. It is such an amazing feeling.” So, if you are looking for a renewed faith, for a chance to worship with a large group of people, or if you are looking for encouragement in a new faith, then Lindsey recommends checking out this event. Just remember to look for the big white tent in the...

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Foreman delivers McLane Lecture Heavyweight champion shares message of perseverance and faith
Mar29

Foreman delivers McLane Lecture Heavyweight champion shares message of perseverance and faith

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Heavyweight champion, minister and entrepreneur are just a few roles George Foreman is known for by his adoring fans. On Wed. March 22, Foreman shared personal life experiences with faculty, staff and community members during the annual McLane Lecture sponsored by Elizabeth and Drayton McLane Jr. The lecture began with McLane introducing Foreman by describing a few of his accomplishments, including fathering 10 children, five of them named George. “I was in the room one time and somebody asked him why he named them all George, and he said, ‘if you’ve been hit in the head as many times as I have, you’d name them all George too,’” McLane said to a burst of laughter from the audience. Foreman set up his lecture by telling about an experience he had sharing his past with one of his sons. He began with his childhood in Houston’s 5th Ward, where he frequently skipped school. As a teenager, Foreman began stealing and mugging people with other boys in the neighborhood. After one such mugging, Foreman had to hide from the police underneath a house and cover himself with sewage slime to keep police dogs from sniffing him out. “I said if I get out from under this house, I will never steal anything again.” Foreman then joined the United States Department of Labor Job Corps to get a fresh start. While at the job corps, Foreman became interested in amateur boxing. He decided to transfer to California to go to boxing school. A year later, he earned a spot on the 1968 US Olympic team, where he competed in Mexico City. “My mom never wanted me to box. After I told [my mom] I was fighting a Russian, she didn’t even tell me to hurry home and eat, she said, ‘well, bye.’” Foreman defeated the Russian boxer to become the Olympic Gold medalist in boxing. “That was probably the happiest moment I’ve had in my athletic career,” Foreman said. “For the first time in my life a dream had come true.” Foreman began his professional boxing career after the Olympics. He fought in many matches, before he was matched against the reigning heavyweight champion of the world, Joe Frazier. “Joe Frazier was the type of fellow that they said you hit and he liked it. If you missed him, he got upset… He had beaten everyone.” Foreman knocked out Frazier during the second round to become the heavyweight champion of the world. “I stood in the ring, and I was all those [former] champions in that moment.” Foreman also recounted his famous...

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Student art exhibit now open
Mar29

Student art exhibit now open

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells The university’s art program has officially opened its doors to the annual student art exhibit. Student artists submitted 107 pieces of art and only 45 pieces of art were selected to be displayed in the gallery. Earlier this year, students were encouraged to submit up to three peices of art to be judged for display by this year’s art judge: Patrick Veerkamp. Veerkamp was an art professor for over 30 years at Southwestern University in Georgetown and recently retired. Veerkamp and a few selected jurors went through the works of art and chose the ones that are currently displayed in the gallery. The art department believes that having an outside opinion come and judge the art pieces will give students an idea of what they’ll face outside the walls of the university. Art professor Hershall Seals doubles as the Department Chair & Director for Baugh Center for the Visual Arts Art Gallery. “The quality is definitely there, and the judge chose very good works,” Seals said. Seals believes this art gallery is a good learning experience for students, and provides different experiences through the artworks displayed. Students can get a sense of validation for the work that they put into their peices and can see that it is appreciated by others. Seals said his favorite thing about hosting this event is seeing the comaraderie between the students. “They’re learning about each other’s art. Students whose works aren’t a part of the show still take part in the process, and exhibit and are encouraged to re-enter later on,” Seals said. During the contest, there were 20 students who received an honorable mention: Laura Yates, Callie Millegan, Isaac Barnhill (two awards), Erin Dona, Rebekah Brooks, Rebecca Macias, Anastasia Hale, Tori Redding (two awards), Jessica Theilacker, Samantha Juarez, Patti Cummings, Chriscina Lampkin, Madeline Hernandez, Ariana Baptiste, Ariel Davis and Courtney Vela. Rebekah Brooks won “Best of Show” for her watercolor painting “Moody, Texas Fever Dream.” Brandon Luna won third place for his set of porcelain vases entitled “Amber and Blue, Mystery and Black, Celadon and Amber.” Maria Ramos won second place for her digital painting “My traditions, heritage and culture.” And Danielle East won first place for her sculpture “An Ode to Those Who Know Why the Cage Bird Sings.” “I feel like all my work paid off and all the time I spent in college and being an art major will work out,” East said. The art gallery is filled with sculptures, drawings, paintings, photography, and much more. The gallery will be open until April 7 in the Baugh Center for...

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Student react to campus-wide cricket invasion
Oct26

Student react to campus-wide cricket invasion

Published in the Oct. 26, 2016 issue of The Bells They come by the thousands every fall, ravaging the streets and buildings of the university, hopping on unsuspecting victims, and causing terror amongst students. Their cold, dark eyes show passing victims no mercy. These detestable, abhorrent, horrific creatures are — crickets. Laura Beverly, a freshman studying mathematics and history with teacher’s certification, has witnessed the cricket attacks firsthand. “I had to kill two crickets in my room on the third floor. Another two, or maybe three, jumped in my hair. The funniest thing that happened though was everyone freaking out when there was a cricket at [my friend’s] dorm.” Another student, sophomore graphic design major Chriscina Lampkin has also dealt with the cricket infestation. “I thought the cricket invasion was really weird,” Lampkin said, “I’ve never seen crickets swarm like that anywhere. It didn’t even happen last year, so I’m still pretty confused.” According to CNN, the reason for the cricket plague is because of low temperatures. As a result, the crickets gather around places that are well-lit and mate – creating a swarm of annoying obstacles. “They were really bad at Mabee,” Lampkin said. “Before you walked in near the post office, they were all huddled in the corner. Not even just on the ground, but on the walls and the ceiling too. I was trying to avoid stepping on them, and I had to stop and look at them. One of them was dead and the other cricket was just sitting on top of it. I was just like, ‘are you mourning?’” “The crickets are gross,” said junior marketing major Kelly Carlin, “I work at Mayborn and when I had to go wash towels, the gym had crickets and it was disgusting.” While not a threat to people, the cricket’s erratic and unpredictable jumps can cause anyone to go into a frenzy. “I work at Academy and they were really bad the first night they came. They were swarming the lights, falling out of the sky, and jumping off of the shelves,” Lampkin said. Thankfully, many of the crickets at the university have died off. Unfortunately, that means there is dead cricket smell in the air. “Crickets have a smell. Not even a smell, but an odor. They smell like bad cat and dog food,” Lampkin said. There are still some crickets hopping around campus, determined to stay alive. Luckily, there are a few ways to get rid of the little buggers. Carlin suggests a good way to get rid of a cricket is to use a vacuum. Lampkin says that she sprayed Home Defense in her...

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Self-defense class teaches students awareness on-campus
Sep28

Self-defense class teaches students awareness on-campus

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells With the number of mass shootings growing by the day, “campus safety” is a popular news topic. However, as a private university with just under 4,000 students in attendance (that’s just under 7% of the population of Texas A&M), campus safety looks a little different to UMHB. So what does it look like to be safe on campus? What are the biggest threats on campus? What are the most common crimes committed here at UMHB? How do we defend ourselves when preventative measures have failed? These are some of the questions that officers Steve Carter and Kevin Mertz answered during their self-defense class, last Thursday evening in the Lord Conference Center. “The main goal of this class is to make students safe on campus,” said Carter. The officer said the biggest danger to students on campus is self-inflicted danger, or students putting themselves in harm’s way. Carter suggests avoiding potentially harmful or illegal situations like not bringing alcohol or drugs on campus. He also suggests that students take their things with them when they leave their vehicles and dorm rooms. “The most common crimes on campus are thefts,” the officer said. “We have thefts that happen from people coming from off campus to on campus, but we also have thefts that are student-to-student.” On-campus thefts are more than likely crimes of opportunity,” Carter said. That’s why the officer stressed so heavily the point of being aware of one’s surroundings and not being an easy target. Carter also cleared up for his self-defense class that any time you enter a vehicle when you’re not supposed to, it’s considered a break-in. After the informational portion of the class, the officers gave the students a tutorial on how to defend themselves against a physical assault. Carter believes that the best defense is being self-aware and being aware of your surroundings. He uses the verse, 1 Peter 5:8: “Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour,” to emphasize his points. “Your best weapon is your mind,” he said. “Your best defense is to be someplace else.” Carter also spoke about listening to “that little voice” that alerts us to when something is wrong. “Listen to that voice,” Carter said. “Don’t ignore it. At the police department, every one of us believes in that little voice; that it is more in tune with your surroundings than you are.” As a precursor to learning basic attack moves from Mertz, he told the attendees that the class was not meant to teach you...

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