Cru rings Belhaven 45-7
Oct26

Cru rings Belhaven 45-7

The undefeated Cru gave fans a treat for homecoming, handily defeating the Belhaven Blazers 45-7. UMHB improved to 7-0 overall and 6-0 in ASC play. UMHB dominated on both sides of the football: the offense exploited personnel mismatches to score seemingly at will, and the defense ground out a near-perfect game. After a solid first quarter, in which running back Byron Proctor rumbled for a 34-yard score and kicker John Mowrey added the extra point and a field goal, the Cru offense took it up a notch, racking up 28 more points in the second quarter. After a 3-and-out from the Cru defense, quarterback Kyle Jones led the offense on a 43-yard drive, capping it off with a perfect pass to receiver TJ Josey for a 38-yard touchdown with 12 minutes to go in the quarter. Jones had targeted Josey on a similar route on the opening drive of the game, but Josey came up short with a rare drop in the end zone. After the game, Josey shared some insight on bouncing back and making the second-quarter play. “I was upset with myself,” Josey said. “But you’ve got to have amnesia; you can’t let it affect you. You have to forget about it and go out and make the next play.” Josey did exactly that. After the defense forced a turnover on downs, Jones began his second drive of the second quarter. He led the Cru to the Belhaven 23-yard line, but there was shaken up. “I moved up in the pocket and their guy hit me right in the chin,” Jones said after Saturday’s win. “I was a little dizzy, but I’m feeling better now.” Quarterback Carl Robinson III entered the game in relief and scored on his first snap of the quarter, cooly hitting receiver Bryce Wilkerson with a bullet to put the Cru up 24-0. Wilkerson had an explanation for the immediate touchdown. “Carl and I have been putting in extra work after practice,” Wilkerson said. “I got around the linebacker who had been jamming me at the line, and Carl saw me, and I scored.” The third touchdown of the Cru’s monstrous second quarter came at the hands of cornerback Kris Brown. Brown recorded his third pick-six of the season, returning the interception 40 yards for a score with six minutes left in the half. Brown continued his dominant play, also logging four tackles and a pass deflection. After defensive end Khevon Shepard recovered a fumble forced by linebacker Tevin Jones, Robinson III led the Cru into the red zone, setting up running back Olan Vining for the team’s fourth touchdown of the second...

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UMHB alumnus brings new life to downtown theater
Oct26

UMHB alumnus brings new life to downtown theater

The Beltonian Theatre, originally built in the 1920s, will reopen for audiences to enjoy classic films Friday, Nov. 3. Because the new owner of the renovated theater is owned by UMHB alumnus, Zechariah Baker, it will accept Cru cash. Baker, who graduated from the university in 2005 with a bachelor’s degree in music, bought the theater three weeks ago. “I’ve wanted to open my own business since I was a kid,” he said. “About three or four years ago, I was managing a movie theater, and I saw the Beltonian was for sale. I started saving and planning. Everything fell the right way a couple of months ago.” The Beltonian, located at 219 E. Central Ave, boasts a 150-seat screening room complete with a small stage. Baker hopes to show classic films, UMHB games and other sporting events, and silent films. He will also be bringing in local artists. “A lot of these old classic movies are films that people saw when they grew up and now can only watch at home,” Baker said. “Now, they’ll be able to see quality classics on a big screen again in a great theater that has a long history in Belton.” Central Texas native and country singer Jenna McDaniel will kick-off opening weekend with a concert from 7 to 9 p.m on Friday, Nov. 3. Then Baker will play The Magnificent Seven (1969) starring Yul Brynner, Steven McQueen and Charles Bronson. The theatre will be open on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. Baker also plans to keep the theatre open every day during the summer months. Tickets will be $3.99 apiece. “A lot of folks in the area have been to the theatre when they were kids,” Baker said. “I want to be able to provide the same kind of experience they got at a discount price.” The Beltonian will not only be showing classic films, but it will also serve buttery popcorn, cotton candy, fountain drinks, candy and a few locally-made gourmet items. Baker hopes that UMHB students will come to the theater for an inexpensive and fun experience. “It’s going to be affordable and close to [campus],” he said. “I’m working with several different organizations on the campus to get some activities here.” UMHB Junior Noah Crosby remembers visiting the theater as a child, when his church rented the theater to show a Gospel movie. “I went there with some old friends of mine, and they were serving popcorn,” Crosby said. “It was nice on the inside with dark red carpet. Crosby regrets that he didn’t go more often when he was younger. “I’ll probably go again. I didn’t know...

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Professor brings home international film prize
Oct26

Professor brings home international film prize

UMHB’s Assistant Professor Andru Anderson took the top prize at the 17th Annual International Festival of Red Cross and Health Films in Varna, Bulgaria on Oct. 12-15. His documentary about overcoming adversity, “Turn Left Now: Surviving the Unbelievable,” will have a preview showing at the new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center Thursday, Nov. 2 at 6:30 p.m. Anderson’s film revolves around the lives of young adult stroke victims, and highlights the fact that as much as 1 in 7 strokes occur in adolescents and young adults, ages 15 to 49 (Centers for Disease Control, 2016) “Part of this movie is trying to show the audience that strokes are not a condition of the elderly. Strokes are actually something that can hit anybody at any part of their lifespan,” Anderson said. “Everyone has a grandfather or grandmother who was either affected by a stroke or has essentially died from a stroke,” he said. “I started looking at that, and then I met a bunch of survivors who were younger.” The film took four years to make, with the first two in pre-production and filming, and then two years of post-production. He had a lot of help from his wife Natalia, he said. “She did everything I did,” he described of her assistantship over the four years. The two met in Dzershinsk, Russia through some friends when traveling there, and six years later they were married. She has seen him go from his industrial film work with Andersen Worldwide and Applied Materials, utilizing his undergraduate and masters degrees from Baylor, to working as a lecturer at Baylor while pursuing his MFA at SMU in Dallas. During this time, he participated in many film projects, and perfected his craft. “I’ve done just about everything: small shorts, full length, film and digital and soup-to-nuts filmmaking,” he said. Anderson is in his third year now at UMHB as the Assistant Professor of Film Studies, and teaches Introduction to Film Studies, Screenwriting, Film History and Criticism, Documentary Film Making, Narrative Film Production, and Special Topics. The program has gone from four students when he got here, to now 22, “I’m preparing students to be independent filmmakers,” he said. He does this by addressing their need to tell stories. “Everyone who makes films wants to tell a story that has not been told before, and then have people see it.” Anderson’s creativity goes beyond film and teaching, as he has always had a glass blowing hobby on the side. But he knew he wanted to do something with production in his career, even in high school when he was building sets for theater. “I...

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Inaugural performance at the PAC
Oct12

Inaugural performance at the PAC

The Sue and Frank Mayborn Center’s inaugural performance, Foundations: A UMHB Instrumental Showcase, started off the week of grand opening festivities. Foundations featured the Jazz Emsemble, Sax Cru, Brass Quintets, Woodwind Choir, Brass Choir, Brass Quintet, Percussion Ensemble, and the Wind Ensemble. The celebration will continue with a private event hosted by President Randy O’Rear for benefactors on Thursday. On Friday, the ribbon and dedication ceremony will take place on the front steps on the center at 1 p.m. The saxophone section of the Jazz Ensemble. Photo by Bryan Guice Audience members walk into the new building for the performance. Photo by Bryan Guice. Audience members wait for the performance to start. Photo by Peter...

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200 and counting: Crusaders advance to 4-0 as Coach Fredenburg gets milestone win
Oct03

200 and counting: Crusaders advance to 4-0 as Coach Fredenburg gets milestone win

By Dylan Jones of the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor The Crusaders’ dismantling of the Southwestern Pirates in Georgetown Saturday by a score of 44-10 marked win number 200 for Coach Pete Fredenburg and the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor football program. It began with starting quarterback T.J. Josey moving back to wide receiver, the same position he played in the last two seasons, since standout sophomore receiver Jonel Reed was out with an injury, and the Cru needed a big threat in the passing game.  With three catches for 130 yards and two touchdowns, Josey didn’t disappoint. Kyle Jones, who got the nod to start at quarterback, found Josey for two touchdowns, while Bryce Wilkerson and Demetrius Taylor each got a touchdown. With a typically run-heavy offense, the Cru decided to do their damage Saturday night by air. Four touchdowns and 397 yards, which is a UMHB record, doesn’t look bad on a stat line, but Jones threw two interceptions as well. The Cru defense had some takeaways of their own: two fumble reco veries for touchdowns for 25 and 93 yards by Kris Brown and Tevin Jones (another UMHB record), respectively. With a halftime score of 16-0, thanks to the two defensive scores – it was unclear if the Cru offense would show up for the second half. However, on the first two possessions of the second half, Kyle Jones found TJ Josey for touchdowns of 56 and 59 yards. Then early in the 4th quarter he found Wilkerson for a 9-yard strike, and with just over two minutes in the game, Jones threw a beauty to Taylor for a 61-yard touchdown. The Pirates weren’t able to get much going offensively, but they were able to muster up 4 sacks on Jones, and as mentioned earlier, intercept him twice. Everyone not named Frederick Hover struggled to find a groove. Pirate quarterback Hover led in both passing and rushing yards with 227 yards and 41 yards respectively. Running back Elijah Smith chipped in with just under 40 yards on the ground. AJ Daniels had two grabs for 60 yards and a touchdown, which was scored with 3:06 in the game. Coach Fredenburg describes the progress the football program has made since 1998 and was quick to let it be known that he was not taking all the credit. “It’s awesome. The 200th win for this program says an awful lot about a whole lot of people,” Fredenburg said. “It makes me very humble. I truly respect and admire all the people that do so much to help our program.” One of those people being Jack Johnson, the special team s coordinator...

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Kathy: Professor, speech coach, survivor
Sep28

Kathy: Professor, speech coach, survivor

“It was devastating,” Kathy Owens, speech coach and speech communications professor at UMHB, said of her cancer diagnosis. “I will never forget that moment in the doctor’s office. That was truly one of those turning points in my life, and it was kind of hard to believe it was happening.” Kathy received her diagnosis of Stage II squamous cell rectal cancer on Jan. 4, which is such a rare form of cancer doctors hesitated to give a diagnosis. Kerry Owens, Kathy’s husband, who is also a speech communications professor at UMHB, said the diagnosis was difficult and took a while to pin down. Owens would eventually undergo chemo and radiation in the spring, surgery in the summer and another series of chemo treatments in the fall. “We really didn’t know what it was because the doctor wouldn’t commit one way or the other as to whether or not it was malignant. So, we had to wait a week to find out for sure. There’s not much of a reaction when you hear that; you’re just kind of numb,” Kerry said. An eight centimeter tumor was discovered during Kathy’s first baseline colonoscopy, which was performed to provide a reference point for future exams. Unfortunately, her results were anything but average. According to the World Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, there have been fewer than 150 cases since 1919. Due to the lack of studies performed with squamous cell rectal cancer, doctors were reluctant to diagnose. “We were frustrated with the doctor at first because it felt like he was holding back information; like he just wouldn’t tell us anything. Then we found out it’s actually an incredibly rare form of cancer….[the doctor] was as lost as we were. This is truly one of those bad luck cancers,” Kathy said. Despite the unsure nature of their diagnosis journey, the couple found waiting to be the most difficult part. “Cancer could be a death sentence or something you recover from. The time we had to go through to find out if this was treatable or terminal was the worst part of it all,” Kerry said. Another obstacle the couple faced with such a rare cancer was the lack of an estimated recovery time. “The other scary thing about it being a very rare form of cancer is that there is no prognosis. They haven’t been able to do any long term studies to know what the outcome will be,” Kathy said. “We had lots and lots of questions but the doctors just didn’t have answers for them because most of us have never seen it before.” Kathy said even though the cancer diagnosis...

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