Students dress to impress for Poe
Oct30

Students dress to impress for Poe

By Jasmine Simmons Characters like Princess Leia Organa, Greek mythology’s Medea, and even Mickey and Minnie Mouse could be found in the Moon building Oct. 26 attending the Edgar Allan Poe Festival. The event is an annual party hosted by the university’s chapter of the International English Honor Society, Sigma Tau Delta, and the English Society, an organization that gives students who are not members of the honor society a chance to participate in select activities throughout the year. “This event came from Sigma wanting to get into the spirit of the season while encouraging literacy among the campus community,” Chair of the English department and co-adviser of Sigma Tau Delta Dr. Jacky Dumas said. Named after the dark and eerie 19th century writer, the gathering is a 13-year tradition where Sigma Tau Delta members dress up as interesting characters, eat delectable snacks and participate in fun activities. “The Poe Party is a get-together with my friends in the English department where we honor one of my favorite writers,” junior Kelsey Blecher said. “The party was great this year because everyone put more thought and energy into it.” Many members of Sigma Tau Delta showed up in unique costumes. Senior English/history major Faith Forester came dressed as Zombie Barbie complete with tiara and open wounds. Forester created the Barbie-gone-grotesque image using fake blood, liquid latex and tissues. “I like to watch Michelle Phan make-up tutorial videos, and I actually got the idea from her,” Forester said. “I really like zombie stuff. I took her idea and made it my own.” Not only did members of Sigma dress to impress at the party, there were also a couple of canine companions imitating stars as well. “(My boyfriend and I) brought our two Shih Tzus, Wicket, full name Wicket Chewbacca of Endor, and Eddy, full name Sir Edgar Allan Pup,” Blecher said. “Wicket was dressed up as Chewbacca and Eddy was dressed up as Ewok, both from Return of the Jedi.” There were plenty of festivities at the party, such as the decimation of a pumpkin piñata, the oration of Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven” and the telling of ghost stories. Also, the honors society presented an award for an original writing piece contest to senior English/history major Maria Martin for a poem she wrote. “My favorite part of the party was without a doubt when we took turns telling ghost stories,” junior English major Sarah Norrell said. “Whether you believe in ghosts or not, it is so much fun listening to other people talk about experiences they’ve had and getting creeped out.” As an English organization, Sigma Tau Delta...

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Lacrosse club earns spot in LSA
Oct16

Lacrosse club earns spot in LSA

It started out last year as a long shot. Trying to find enough athletes to field a team for a sport that most Texans have never heard of seemed an impossible task. However, the long shot scored, and now the club lacrosse team is a member of a college league. UMHB lacrosse was admitted to the Lone Star Alliance Lacrosse League recently. The Crusaders will be part of the LSA’s Division II, which consists of nine other teams in the Texas/Louisiana/Oklahoma area. “Being in the league, it’s going be a lot more exciting, a lot more competitive, and (take) real drive to actually compete and win,” junior marketing major Alfredo Rojas said. “Hopefully, it will be a better experience overall for the team. It’s a good way to get organized.” The LSA lacrosse season will start Jan. 26. Games will take place on four different weekends with two games played each weekend. Cru lacrosse’s competition last year was limited to scrimmages because they were not affiliated with any league. Now players will be able to have a set schedule with chances at playoffs through the LSA. “It’s going to help the school overall because it gets our name out there more,” junior business major and president Rowdy Gillis said. Last year the club was founded as a school organization, scheduling seven games last year and finishing the year with two victories. “Last year was kind of chaotic and unorganized,” Rojas said. “I’m looking to get a real team with some real wins on the schedule.” Despite some bumps along the road, lacrosse is back for another season. With Gillis as new president leading the charge, the club hopes to build its success. “Last year was in disarray,” Gillis said. “We didn’t have real organized practices. We’re going to be more organized this year. We’re going to approach this professionally.” The club is run by the players. Members of the LSA were impressed by the team who often fielded a team of around 10 players last season, the minimum number necessary. “Last year, even with the odds against us, we still stepped on the field to compete,” Gillis said. LSA members applauded the effort shown by the Cru. They have already started practices, but team members are busy searching for new players to join their team. They say that no experience is required to join. “I saw a sign for it (lacrosse) in Hardy and ignored it,” freshman exercise sports science major Ryan Ramirez said. “Then my friend Josh told me I should try it out.” Gillis hopes that with the added exposure through the LSA, more high school lacrosse...

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Students reveal patriotic side with ’Merica Monday
Oct16

Students reveal patriotic side with ’Merica Monday

If a stranger visited campus on a typical Monday, he might stop and ask himself, “Why are these students celebrating the Fourth of July in the middle of the fall?” The answer is simple: It’s ’Merica Monday. Each week, a group of Crusaders honors old glory by donning their most patriotic outfits. Sophomore business administration major Ryan Sewell is said to be the mastermind behind the ‘Merica Monday fun. The trend is on the rise on campus, and Sewell wanted to get the word out by taking his idea to the Campus Activities Board. Lucky for Sewell, a patriotic palooza was in the works. Sept. 17 was Constitution Day, and the university planned to raise awareness about its history. CAB Assistant Director Jeff Sutton explained that schools celebrate the anniversary of the U.S. Constitution and the men who signed it in 1787. “It’s the next best thing to the Fourth of July,” senior sociology major Mary Baucom said. Held at noon in the SUB, the celebration offered pamphlets and cupcakes to students. Though it is not the first time CAB had honored Constitution Day, this year’s event was one of the biggest yet. “’Merica Monday just kick started it,” Sewell said. Sophomore nursing major Lizzy McElyea was excited to be involved. “I got a Facebook invite that said it was Constitution Day and to wear red, white and blue to rep your American pride, so that is exactly what I did,” she said. “Me and my roommate decided we’d find what red, white and blue we had in our closets.” McElyea completed her look with a manicure even Betsy Ross would envy. “I have a psuedo-American flag when I put all my nails together,” she said. Freshman finance major James Ewing was also ready to party like a patriot. He sported red pants and a blue American flag graphic T-shirt. “It’s kind of an underlying tone on campus that it’s ’Merica Monday, so you’re supposed to dress up for America,” he said. “Then Constitution Day was on Monday… mainly how I knew about it was through my friend who works for CAB.” Freshman business marketing major Ashley Lovett is another CAB member who participated in the event. She credits Sewell for inspiring the red, white and blue wardrobe. “I (dressed up) the last two Mondays. I went thrifting today so I (would) have two more Mondays before I have to recycle,” she said. Both she and Ewing agree that Constitution Day was a success. “I didn’t need a cupcake. I just went because I love America,” Lovett said. “Oh yeah,” Ewing said. “I’m a huge America fan.” Though Constitution...

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Speaker demonstrates the Lord’s plan
Oct16

Speaker demonstrates the Lord’s plan

From the stacks of the world’s most renowned libraries to the beliefs of the most prolific theologians of our times, there are varying thoughts and beliefs about the will of God. People often find themselves asking “What is God’s specific plan for my life? How can I find my calling and purpose?” If you’ve ever found yourselves thinking such thoughts, you’re not the only one. Austin Fischer, college pastor at the Vista Church in Belton, spoke at the Oct. 10 chapel on God’s will. He believes that we are misguided when it comes to searching for the Lord’s plans in our lives. “It seems the biggest mistake our generation makes—and in particular the religious subculture we are a part of makes—is the assumption that God has a specific will for our lives which we are supposed to seek out and try to find,” he said. “As such, we waste untold amounts of energy looking for something that doesn’t exist: a specific, meticulously mapped-out will for our lives.” Fischer believes that we focus too much on what we don’t know rather than what we do. Senior Christian studies major Cody Roth said, “I’ve been trusting God my whole life, and he hasn’t failed me.” This is the attitude Fischer wants students to take. He encourages them to look at what God is doing in their lives rather than a sign. He thinks there are pitfalls in being on a Christian campus. “In relation to determining God’s will on a Christian campus, perhaps the greatest danger is being too spiritual about it,” he said. “God speaks to us through the lives he has given us, our likes and dislikes, our abilities and limitations, the people and circumstances around us.” Fischer encourages students to be engaged in the Bible. Freshman church music major Greggory Miller said, “The Bible is your instruction manual, so you should always spend time in it. Constantly look back on the Word. As you live, knowing God’s instructions, you are going to do His will because that is what he would have you do.” Often times there are so many ideas about God’s will that it becomes confusing. “While there are lots of viewpoints and opinions on this topic, encouragement and peace comes from letting Scripture speak to us on this matter,” Fischer said. In his sermon he mentioned that in living out a life that is God centered, Christians would be doing his will. He used the example of Adam in the garden to explain that God told Adam he could eat from any tree he wanted and that Adam wasn’t limited to a certain schedule for...

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Cru leaders engage in peer mentoring

Welcome Week at the university is an exciting time as freshmen and transfers are welcomed onto the campus by their Cru Leaders, but their job doesn’t stop at the end of the week. Kristy Brischke, director of Transition Programs, is in charge of the peer mentoring program, the CLs and their jobs. “They serve as Welcome Week leaders as well as the big part of the peer mentor program. They continue on into the freshman seminar classes with their Welcome Week groups,” she said. CLs participate in the freshman seminar class with their students for the first eight weeks. They must keep up with their students, engage them in the campus community, encourage them and provide any resources that students might need. Welcome Week leaders return to school a week early in the semester and attend the training camp. “It’s a long five days, but I think they’ve really enjoyed it,” Brischke said. Junior education major Chad Manns, a Welcome Week steering committee member this year, thinks peer mentoring is profitable for incoming students. “This program is very beneficial because coming to a new school without family around anymore can be very stressful. This program helps the incoming freshmen know that they have someone that will be there for them and will always be available to help out in any way possible,” he said. Sixty peer mentors were a part of the program this year. Ten of them were returnees. “The CLs themselves, I think, have really enjoyed their time in pouring into students,” Brischke said. Sophomore English major Sarah Tipton and junior elementary education major Kathryn Cielonko were peer mentors for a group of freshmen this year. “Just getting to meet all the new freshmen and transfer students and helping acclimate them to the campus was the best part of it for me,” Tipton said. The training week consisted of sessions on understanding college students, role playing, team building and conversation starters. The leaders put much time into developing relationships with their students. “It seems really easy how to start a conversation, but it’s also one of those things that you kind of have to have practice on how to take it to the next level,” Brischke said. Manns said, “The peer mentors have put in a lot of time to spend with the freshmen and to really get to know about them personally as well as spiritually. It gives mentors the chance to be a great model spiritually for the freshmen to see and know that they are loved by someone.” . Something new for next year is a group of six former Cru leaders, called CL...

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Students volunteer for special cause
Oct16

Students volunteer for special cause

By Ke’Una Gates and Tyler Agnew Crusaders have once again shown their kindness and willingness to give back to the community. The university hosted an event entitled InKidAble in partnership with the Children’s Special Needs Network Oct. 13 in an effort to bring awareness of the assistance and resources in the area designed for special needs caregivers. The program provided resources and information to the parents and caregivers of special needs children. Since the conference was free and open to the public many families were afforded the opportunity to learn more about nurturing their children. Assistant Professor of education Dr. Kris Ward headed the event. She said, “The mission of the conference is to provide an opportunity for parents to network with each other and to learn more about raising a child with a disability.” There was a big turnout with more than 100 children coming to the event. One obstacle from having so many attendees was childcare. “We want to provide child care for them so that they can come. It’s hard to find child care for a child with a severe disability,” Ward said. “So for that purpose we completely met our goal. Every single child had at least one if not two Mary Hardin-Baylor students to keep them entertained and safe all day long so that their parents could go to the conference.” Each worker was trained to ensure that all chidren would be safe. The volunteers were a huge blessing to the families they served. Sophomore nursing major Katie Clemmer said, “I decided to volunteer because I love children, and I want to get involved more on campus.” Like many acts of service, the giver is affected just as the receiver is. Clemmer gained a lot from spending time with the special needs attendees. She said, “I learned that God’s love can be expressed in the simplest of ways and just how appreciative the parents were to have college students take time out to do so.” The event was created in an effort not only to reach out, but assure the caregivers of special needs children that others are going through the same obstacles. It was organized to teach the parents about any scenario they might encounter. “Breakout sessions included grief process, working with schools, accessing resources and networking,” Ward said. Many different groups got involved in InKidAble. From churches to entire departments, many came to lend a hand. The music department got involved as music majors, provided music teachings and game interactions while the parents were in their sessions. “We value the mission of this conference and give attention and help for parents and children...

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