Fair promotes social work jobs
Jan29

Fair promotes social work jobs

The Social Work Fair this past Friday gave social work majors the opportunity to look for an internship that will be completed during their  senior year. Professor of social work and field director, Susan Hutchinson, is in charge of the annual event. “It is about the opportunity for students to see the selection that we have regarding their year-long field internship. So they’ll be coming into their internships in the fall, and they’ll do two semesters,” she said. Seventeen agencies were present at the fair for prospective interns to see where they might consider working during their year-long study. “The field instructors that will be supervising the students come and have their booths, and the incoming students walk around and that way they are able to learn about the agency as well as meet their prospective field instructors,” Hutchinson said. Junior social work major, Anjail Arthur, was thinking of working with the Bell County Social Work Program for the Mental Health  Indigent Defense. “I am looking at all the agencies to see what’s out there. I want to work in the prison system with the inmates that are getting ready to go back into society and the reintegration process,”                 Arthur said. Prospective interns were not the only ones at the fair. Some students who are currently interns were also present. Senior social work major Chelsea Owens was at the fair representing the agency where she is doing her internship. “I’m interning with the Children’s Advocacy Center in Belton, and I have a CASA case where I advocate for the rights of the child in court,” Owens said. She observes forensic interviews and has also been able to help with group therapy for children who have been sexually abused. “I love it. If I could go every day, I would. I chose where I wanted to do my internship after interviewing at three places,” she said. While this is only an internship, Owens has an idea of what she would like to do with her major after graduation. “I hope to work with abused children whether that is with CPS or being a guardian ad litem for the county,” she said. Owens also gave some good advice for students who are looking for an internship related to social work. She said, “Pray about it and go somewhere you are passionate about. If you’re not passionate about helping the people you’re working with, it won’t be enjoyable going 16 hours a...

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Kristi Hofferber speaks out against abortion in all forms
Jan29

Kristi Hofferber speaks out against abortion in all forms

By Sarah Norrell Sobs were heard as Kristi Hofferber and a woman hugged and prayed together. Hofferber had just finished giving her testimony in Wednesday’s chapel service. Her unique story afforded students the chance to experience hope, even when dealing with horrendous circumstances. “God is here today,”  Dr. George Loutherback said. “He’s right over there,” he added, pointing at Hofferber, who was visiting with students. As a child born from rape and incest, Hofferber has spent her whole life dealing with her adoption. Now, she shares the story with audiences across the nation hoping to reach other adoptees or anyone considering abortion. “Each adoptee experience is something different,” Hofferber began. “I’m not going to be defined by my DNA. Yes, it’s there, but I know I’m God’s child; God called me to life. God is my creator, and He ordained me to life.” Hofferber always knew she was adopted. Despite her parents’ consistent offers, she never wanted to know about her biological parents. But that changed while on her way to New Orleans for a mission trip five years ago when a traveling companion mentioned having an abortion. Hofferber went to her parents, who explained what they knew: her biological mother had been raped by her father, Hofferber’s biological grandfather, when she was 16 years old. When her mother was 15, she miscarried, then Hofferber was conceived, born and put up for adoption. Following Hofferber, her mother was forced by her father to terminate four more pregnancies by abortion. Hofferber knew she needed to try to find her mother and fill the void in her life to begin to heal. With only a name, she spent two days searching through social media before finding her mother and contacting her. Hofferber found her biological mother and half sister, who was expecting a son. At the request of her mother, she went to visit for a weekend. “Here I am driving two states away to meet her for the very first time, and I can tell you that was a weekend I’ll never forget,” Hofferber said. “We shared a lot that weekend, a lot of emotions. It, of course, wasn’t easy for her because of the situation, but it wasn’t easy for me either.” With difficulty, her mother began to explain the circumstances surrounding Hofferber’s birth, but she was stopped. “I just looked at her and said ‘I already have an idea, and I love you. It doesn’t change anything for me,’” Hofferber said. Since then, she has continued a relationship with her mother. “Her testimony was really touching, and I felt moved by her courage to travel around and share...

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Hot coffee, cool vibe welcome students
Jan29

Hot coffee, cool vibe welcome students

Heads up, caffeine lovers, there’s a new coffee shop in town. Part of the college experience is finding a trendy local business to go study or hang out. Enter Arusha’s Coffee, the latest hot spot in Belton. Named for a coffee-growing city in Tanzania, the java joint boasts more than 100 different types of tea and dozens of other drinks. The latest project of owner Hatem Chouchane, Arusha’s opened in December. Before venturing into the coffee business, Chouchane was based in Harker Heights. As the story goes, he was running errands through Belton and saw a “For Sale” sign in an old building downtown. An idea began to brew. He quickly called up his friend and manager, Ernst Jacques. “He called me and said, ‘Hey, Jacques, we’re going to do something special, something new,’” Jacques said. A month later, Chouchane and Jacques were moving into Arusha’s. The shop has been gaining ground ever since. Junior education major Zach Martin first heard about the place from a friend and has since become a fan. “I think the overall atmosphere is a lot calmer than other places I’ve found around Belton,” he said. “It’s good to see that since they just opened…they’ve been getting so much business from people.” Martin is not the only student who enjoys Arusha’s ambience. Senior criminal justice major Taylor Holleyman found the spacious venue perfect for studying and hanging out with friends. “They have things to do like pool and dart boards,” he said. Sophomore public relations major Jennifer Wassell likes that the business stays open until 10 p.m., an aspect other places around town don’t have. The hours provide plenty of time for students to stop by between classes and into the evenings. In the future, Arusha’s hopes to expand the menu to include more food and to start hosting live music and karaoke nights. Chouchane also plans to accept CruCards soon, a feature which excites students. Barely two months since opening its doors, the coffee shop has plenty of loyal customers. “We already have a lot of people coming in and out,” Jacques said. “I’ve met a couple people who want to try all the teas, which is over a hundred different flavors.” For those who want to take the taste of Arusha’s home with them, the store sells coffee beans, giving visitors incentive to try each roast. The staff’s passion for people and coffee is a key ingredient to Arusha’s instant success. “One of the things that sets this place apart from other places is that (the owners) do take the time to talk to you,” Martin said. “The fact that it’s (them)...

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More C3 conversations: exploration for students
Jan08

More C3 conversations: exploration for students

This semester, the university will be sponsoring some events to help ease the pain of transitioning into unfamiliar class schedules, and lighten the burden of hectic course loads students will have to endure throughout the spring semester. The school will host another C3 event Jan. 14. The events seek to create a community dedicated to exploring the relationship between Christianity and culture. The latest conversation will feature Makoto Fujimura, an artist known for his lectures, books and paintings. Some of his work includes The Splendor of the Medium, Water Flames and Charis. Associate Professor, department chair of the music department and director of C3, Dr. Mark Aaron Humphrey, is excited about Fujimura’s visit to the university, and believes students can relate to him in many ways. “He is a deep thinker about important issues facing artists of faith. There are some great blogs and accessible books about these things, and there are some great scholarly works on the topic as well. He represents both accessible and scholarly work, which makes him a great fit for us. People from a variety of backgrounds in the arts and faith can relate to his thinking,” Humphrey said. University transitions program director and advisory board member of C3 Kristy Brischke was pleased with the results from a conversation with Christian recording artist, Michael Gungor at the C3 event Nov. 9. “We had a great turnout, nearly 200 students on a Friday afternoon. What I loved about it is it wasn’t just another concert or event. It was an intimate conversation with Michael Gungor, where the students really got to know him, his motivations, his beliefs (and) his personality. It was really neat,” she said. So far, the C3 conversations have been a hit with the student body. Brischke said, “Students really seemed to enjoy it. It was different. I think they were impressed with the newness. As the provost said, it was one of the best events he has seen on campus since his time here. That says a lot.” Even though some students may not be aware of the Fujimura’s work, Brischke is optimistic that the turnout of the next C3 event will be just as good as the last. “Makota Fujimura is not as known or popular as Gungor. I really hope students will grasp onto the idea of C3 and come out to hear him,” she said. The conversation with Fujimura will be held in the Baugh Center for Visual Arts Jan. 14 at 1:30 p.m. and is free and open to the public. The next C3 event will be with Leslie Leyland Fields, author and essayist, Feb. 5. at...

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Cru football finishes strong
Jan08

Cru football finishes strong

The  football team has finished its season by repeating the second best run in the school’s football program. It ended with an overall record of 13-1, tying 2004 for the most wins in a season. The Crusaders fell to the Mount Union Purple Raiders in the Division III National Football Championship semifinals 48-35 Dec. 8. Graduate Assistant Coach Derrick Williams has been a part of the football program for eight years. He said, “With finishing 13-1 and coming up short to compete for the National Championship, we realized that this football team had leadership emerge at the right times. We wouldn’t have made the run that we did if it wasn’t for our senior class. I have been around this program for eight years, and to see these guys grow into great leaders, just made this season even more exciting.” With 7:39 left in the game, the Cru went up 35-28 off a three-yard quarterback run by LiDarral Bailey. The Purple Raiders answered with a touchdown of their own, tying the game 35-35 with 3:42 left in regulation. Mount Union then forced another stop and charged down the field on a game-winning drive to go up 42-35 with only five seconds remaining. The Cru drew up one last play, but the Purple Raiders forced a fumble and scored another touchdown to end the game. The Cru lost 48-35 in the closest game Mount Union faced all year. Mount Union went on to conquer the Division III National Championship Stagg Bowl, defeating the St. Thomas Tommies 28-10. The Cru defeated Louisiana College, Franklin College and Wesley College before falling to Mount Union. The semifinal showing was the third time the Crusaders have appeared in the national semifinals. In 2004, they made it to the Division III National Championship Stagg Bowl, but lost to Linfield College 28-21. Junior exercise and sport science major Andy McAteer said the season was special. “As a team, we grew week by week. Every day we could literally see it in motion. We were led by a great group of seniors, and without them it wouldn’t be possible. Having said that our goal was to win the Stagg Bowl, it’s up to the seniors to lead for next year.” Seniors LiDarral Bailey, Javicz Jones and Sam Maxie will suit up to play one more game and represent the Crusaders. Each player was selected to compete in this year’s inaugural Dream Bowl at Salem Stadium in Roanoke, Va., Jan. 21. It features the best NCAA Division III and NAIA players across the country. A senior sports management major, Jones is honored to be chosen to play in...

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CruFest celebrates Preview Weekend
Dec06

CruFest celebrates Preview Weekend

Last Friday, letter jackets galore decorated campus. It was Preview Weekend, and high school students from around the state came to get a taste of college life. Thanks to Campus Activities Board, the visitors had an unforgettable experience. An annual Preview Weekend event, CruFest offers visitors the chance to mingle with students through different activities ranging from coffee house concerts to flying down zip lines. CAB puts great effort into planning the events and ensuring that things run smoothly. Junior education major Jessica Hoermann participated in the preparation. “(W)e divide and conquer our events,” she said. The various CAB members sign up for the different time slots to help pull off each event. This year, Hoermann signed up for CruFest and chose to organize the coffee house and concert portion of the evening. “(It’s) one of my favorite events,” she said. The coffee house event took place in Shelton Theater, which was filled with students chatting, coloring and enjoying the evening’s entertainment. Outdoors, another popular activity was the wax hand station. “Literally there’s a vat of wax and you stick your hand in it, make any kind of shape that you want to, pull it out and let it cool,” Hoermann explained. “Last year, we had a ton of people do it. The line was forever long; we actually had to tell people they couldn’t do it by the end.” This year, students stood in line for several hours just to make a wax souvenir. “Apparently people have been lining up since 6:50 p.m., and our event didn’t even start until 7:30,” Hoermann said. “So that means that the wax hands is crazy popular and should be used for a lot of events.” Through the activity, CAB helped host students interact with their high school guests through many fun experiences. Freshman biology major Jennifer Owens and her roommate welcomed two students. She enjoyed getting to know the girls through the Preview Weekend events. Though her guests enjoyed CruFest, they were even more excited to try their luck at Running Man, a popular nighttime campus game. “They really looked forward to playing, and they got all decked out in black,” Owens said. “It was really fun.” Austen Hinojosa, a senior in high school, heard about Preview Weekend from his cousin, freshman sports management major Ryan Ramirez. He and his cousin spent CruFest racing on the bounce house obstacle course and were counting down the minutes to Running Man. “We’ve already got a strategy,” Ramirez said. Freshman exercise sport science major Jake Morrison tagged along with the two cousins and enjoyed meeting other preview students along the way. He recalls the...

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