Missionaries brought to campus
Nov13

Missionaries brought to campus

Last week, missionaries from all around the globe came to the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor to share their stories with the student body. The Baptist Student Ministry hosted Missions Emphasis Week, a time for students to learn about mission work across the world and how they can get involved. The theme of the week was ‘Live Sent,’ serving as a reminder that God calls his children to share His Word with others. Special focus seminars, each led by a person in the mission field, were held throughout the week. Some topics included how to discern your calling, the living situations for missionaries across the world, the different types of missions, and what missionaries can encounter in the field. The missionaries were also able to share their stories to individual classes, as well as at chapel, at ONE and the ONE After Party. A large portion of the student body had the opportunity to hear a missionary experience during chapel on Wednesday. After the students participated in worship, the Executive Director of UK-USA Ministries, Mike Taylor, shared his story. He began with the statement, ‘God loves go,’ and supported it by reading from Matthew 9:35-38. Taylor asked students to look for opportunities around them and to listen to what God is trying to say. Although he works to bring the Gospel to the United Kingdom, he left students with the encouraging word that serving God does not have to be worldwide, but can be right here on this campus. “He is calling you. He is calling me to engage with the culture around us,” Taylor said. “There’s no time like this time to be sent by God.” The BSM also hosted a number of special events throughout the week. A Prayer Room was open every day for students and faculty and a mission fair was set up all week in Bawcom Student Union. On both Tuesday and Thursday, a girls night was held in Burt and a guys night was held at the BSM. At the missions fair in Bawcom, students could learn all about how to get involved with the local and global community. The missionaries that participated worked in many different countries including Africa, Asia and Europe. Kelly Curry, founder and director of Foundation in Christ Ministries, leads a mission program in Galway, Ireland that reaches out to students in the community. The ministry has a few different outreaches they lead, a local Christian coffee shop, a youth outreach and a counseling center. At his mission’s display table adorned with shamrocks and a large Irish Flag, Curry shared all about his work in Ireland, including why he created...

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Nursing program still growing
Nov13

Nursing program still growing

It is impossible to think about UMHB without thinking of the nursing program. This major has a higher enrollment than any other program on campus, and if you aren’t a nursing major yourself, you definitely know one. One of the most familiar sights on campus is the iconic purple scrubs that the nursing students wear. In 1903, a school of nursing was founded at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple. The program was later transferred to UMHB, and in 1970, it became a baccalaureate degree program. In 1972, the first group of nursing students graduated from the program with 28 students in the class. Since its beginnings at UMHB, the nursing program has earned accreditation from the Texas State Board of Nurse Examiners, the National League for Nurses and the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. The Scott & White School of Nursing currently has 23 faculty members as well as 57 adjunct faculty members. As of fall 2017, the program has 699 enrolled students, making it the largest on UMHB’s campus. The nursing program is housed in the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center. The state-of-the-art building is over 76,000 square feet and contains a simulation hospital, clinical labs, offices, classrooms, a chapel and other rooms that help nursing students prepare for the workforce. Junior nursing major Emily Crowson loves being a part of UMHB’s nursing program. After graduation, she hopes to work as either a labor and delivery nurse or a nurse in a neonatal infant care unit (NICU). She says that the best part of the nursing program is clinicals, where students get to practice a real-life application of their skills. “Clinicals [are] awesome. That’s my favorite part.” One of the most life-changing experiences she has had as a nursing student was witnessing and assisting with the birth of a baby. “That was the most amazing experience…I’ve ever witnessed in my life…I think that’s what made me want to try to do labor and delivery.” In addition to offering undergraduate nursing degrees, UMHB offers masters and doctorate degrees within the program. Dr. Lynn Heise serves as an assistant professor and the Interim Director of Doctor of Nursing Practice. She says that the best part of the nursing program is the simulation labs. “The faculty [members] that work in simulation are very supportive of us. The [undergraduates], before they actually get into the hospital, have already learned the skills on mannequins…so it’s not quite as frightening.” Not all nursing programs have simulation hospitals for their students to use, and by providing this for the students, UMHB has given the nursing students a competitive edge in the workforce....

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ROTC Photo Gallery
Nov13

ROTC Photo Gallery

Cadet Ashley Matta gives a hand signal to Cadet Nathan Gammage. Photo by Lauren Lum Photo by Lauren Lum Cadets Nicholas Cormier and Valerie Boyd discuss tactics during the ROTC Cadets’ Performance Lab on Wednesday, Oct. 17 at Peacock Ranch on the UMHB campus. Photo by Lauren Lum Cadet Alexandra Dalle looks over her shoulder during a drill. Photo by Lauren Lum Photo by Lauren Lum Staff Sgt. William Thomas guides cadets, left to right: Victoria Bella and Stone Klingaman. Photo by Sarah Ifft Cadet Joel Loua gives instructions to Cadet Ashton Bentley during the ROTC cadets’ performance lab on Wednesday, Oct. 17 at Peacock Ranch on the UMHB campus. Photo by Lauren Lum Cadet Joel Loua (right) instructs Cadet Robert Stafford (left). In far background, Cadet Amber Delano gives a hand signal (left), while Cadet Ryan Trenholm watches (right). Photo by Sarah...

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UMHB’s ROTC program trains future heroes
Nov13

UMHB’s ROTC program trains future heroes

This October marks the 10-year anniversary of the UMHB Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). The program develops students into commissioned U.S. Army officers while they are earning their degree. “Once you graduate, you will commission as a second lieutenant, and then you will move up through the ranks and… given everything is done correctly, you should hit captain in about four or five years,” Capt. Charles Wilson, assistant professor of military science, said. UMHB’s program has approximately 30 cadets. They work in conjunction with Texas A&M Central Texas’ (TAMU-CT) ROTC program, which has approximately 50 cadets. ROTC offers scholarships to cadets. The two-, three- and four-year scholarships pay for tuition and provide a stipend for books. When a student accepts the scholarship, they must sign a contract that states they will finish ROTC to become commissioned officers. ROTC is divided into four segments: Military Science (MS) Level 1 (freshmen), 2 (sophomores), 3 (juniors), and 4 (seniors). MS Level 1 cadets learn rank structure, customs and courtesies such as saluting and standing at attention, and time management. MS Level 2 cadets learn how to function as a team, and they learn land navigation. MS Level 3 cadets learn how to manage large groups of personnel, while receiving guidance from the MS Level 4 cadets. They are put into more key leadership positions to display what they’ve learned during their time in ROTC. MS Level 4 cadets learn how to lead and manage on a higher level, and prepare to commission into the Army upon graduation. Students in the ROTC program can study any major. The classes are typically held on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays. On Wednesdays, cadets participate in a lab portion of the program, where they will put what they’ve been learning into practice. Labs are usually done with the TAMU-CT cadets. ROTC Cadets have Physical Training (PT) Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 7 a.m. During PT, cadets do cardio exercises, weight lifting, and ruck marching with 35+ pounds. ROTC cadets do not have to go to basic training like enlisted soldiers. “These individuals are coming out as officers, so the information that they learn here is a condensed version of what they learn at basic training, but [cadets are] not learning how to follow; they’re learning how to be leaders,” Captain Wilson said. “They have to have the same core understanding of basic Army [doctrine] as privates, but leaving out of here they’re going to be officers at the end of the day, so this 21, 22-year-old female or male is going to be in charge of this 45-year-old sergeant that’s been in the military...

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Homecoming Photo Gallery
Nov06

Homecoming Photo Gallery

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The Disney College Program: a look behind the mouse ears
Oct10

The Disney College Program: a look behind the mouse ears

Do you want to have fun? Want to live in Disney World for a whole semester? Want to get college credit? Then the Disney College Program is the internship for you. This program lets you live at Walt Disney World or Disneyland for a whole semester. You get to work at the park and you also get paid as well. There are a lot of different departments that you can work with. You can work with attractions or transportation, or, you can work as a convention guide, custodian, or photographer, to name a few positions. A student named Kylie Wittmer, who was a film and television major when she participated in the program, said positive things about it. “The best things about the program are the friends you make while you’re there and being able to call Disney World your home,” Wittmer said. “People will tell you that the friends you make at Disney World are lifelong friends and you may think that sounds dramatic but they are right, you get to know these people at the happiest place on earth. You will get to know each park like the back of your hand and really never get sick of it. I can’t see advertisements for Disney World anymore without being sad that I’m not there.“ During a Disney College Program information meeting at UMHB on Sept. 26, Assistant Professor (Management) Chris Langford had a similar sentiment, because he loved his time at Disney and he wants students to experience the program. ”Going to the Disney College Program was one of the top five experiences of my life,” Langford said. “I worked at Splash Mountain and me and my group of friends were called Splash Trash. After the program we used to go on trips to Dis- ney World.” Film studies major Alyssa Silva was accepted into the Disney College Program for the spring 2019 semester with a custodial position. “I applied the day applications came out in August,” Silva said. “Within two weeks, I received an email with a link to the second step of the application which was a web based interview. As soon as I finished the web-based interview, I was informed I made it to the last step, the phone interview. I scheduled my phone interview and the day of I was super nervous, but I feel as though I did well and was confident. Then, after four long weeks of waiting, I got the magical email saying I got accepted into the DCP! I was at a stunt night rehearsal when I found out and had tears of joy. I then called my mom...

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