Paint and passion: students compete
Mar14

Paint and passion: students compete

Colors and life flow off the walls, and intricate designs adorn the various artwork displayed in a student art competition in the Baugh Center for Visual Arts building. However, a painting that portrays a smiling young woman surrounded by butterflies stands out among the rest. The art department held a student art competition, and the results were announced March 7. The Best in Show award went to senior mass communication/journalism major Samantha Hardcastle, for her piece titled My Inner Mona-Lisa. “It’s actually (from) a photo my sister took of me, and it represents kind of how I feel inside,” Hardcastle said, “ my passion for God and for life and for what I want to do.” She cleverly combined both faith and family aspects into the self-portrait. The butterflies in the painting are symbolic of how Christianity and her family have influenced her life. “The butterflies represent my Christianity because there are seven of them, and the five that are actually on me represent my family,” Hardcastle said. “The one on top represents my father because we were adopted when we were really young, and so he took us under his wing. (It represents) God as well because we’re sheltered under his wing in Psalm 91.” Hardcastle wishes that anyone who sees My Inner Mona-Lisa can see how God influenced her art and that her art can influence them as well. “I know you can’t see God exactly on it, but I know that that’s what it’s exemplifying and that’s what I hope they (people) see,” she said. “It’s also very humbling… that it can serve its own little purpose in a way to      inspire.” More than 40 works are displayed in the student competition room in. Hardcastle applauded every piece of art in the room. “They’re beautiful. They’re absolutely beautiful,” she said. “Everyone has their own expression in art, and it’s beautiful to see.” Six honorable mention awards were given at the event, and five cash awards to two third-place winners, second-place winner, first-place winner and Best in Show award. Professor of art at the University of Arkansas at Monticello, Tom Richard, was the juror of the competition. “I was struck by the amount of quality artwork available for selection into the exhibition,” Richard said in a statement displayed at the exhibit. “The artists’ work made it quite difficult to choose work to be selected for the exhibition and to choose the best of the best.” The painting selected by Richard to be first-place winner was The Odyssey by junior graphic design major Chance Alvis. His painting stood out because of its unique style and message it conveyed...

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Salsa Night spices up campus life
Mar14

Salsa Night spices up campus life

Friday nights in Belton can be muy tranquilo, but on March 8, the Spanish Club brought a bit of Latin spice to campus life. The group hosted Salsa Night, an evening filled with dance lessons and Mexican appetizers. The club also collected gently used clothing donations for Helping Hands. Dr. Rubí Ugofsky-Méndez, the adviser for the Spanish Club, said the organization averages between eight and 10 members. The club prepared several types of Mexican food for the attendees to snack on, including tamales, chips and queso. Junior public relations major and president Samantha Garza was excited to help host the salsa lessons. She and the rest of the club advertised through chapel, MyCampus, Facebook and word of mouth. They hoped all the publicity would bring a good turnout. “Last year, we probably had 40 to 50 people,” she said. “There were a lot of international students.” The dance lessons were provided by senior Spanish major Julio Hinkson, a student from Panama. When he heard the club was looking for a new salsa instructor, he gladly offered to help out. “I first started last fall,” he said. “They were looking for somebody to teach Spanish dance — salsa, merengue — and I fit in that place, so I decided to do it.” Hinkson grew up dancing and enjoys sharing his talent with others. “I love doing it,” he said. “If somebody wanted to learn, I don’t mind teaching them. I don’t go to clubs, so my pastime is to teach people the right way, not just any way.” Freshman Tucker Saxton was one of the first students to arrive at the Lord Conference Center for lessons. An avid country dancer, he looked forward to learning a new style. “I love two-stepping,” he said. “I’ve never done salsa before.” Saxton and several friends joined nearly 50 other students and faculty members for a night filled with Hispanic culture. Excitement grew as pairs gathered closely around Hinkson to watch each dance step demonstration. The dancers then stepped back again to try the moves on their own and receive one-on-one help from the instructor. Hinkson gave instructions on three different styles of Latin dance. “I did salsa, bachata, and then I did merengue,” he      explained. “Bachata is basically a slow dance … salsa is a beat of six and merengue is a faster beat.” Ugofsky-Méndez was delighted to see students participate in the event. She enjoyed watching and taking pictures as everyone figured out        each step. Freshman biology major Sahana Gollapalli heard about the event from Garza. She thought the dance lessons were entertaining. The one downside to the evening? The lack of...

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Concert to help campus family adopt
Mar06

Concert to help campus family adopt

By Sarah Norrell The stage is set: three chairs sit in the corner by the door, two holding guitars and one holding an amp connected to speakers. Two microphone stands guard the chairs like soldiers. The chairs are filled, and the floor is packed with people as the smell of coffee fills the air. The sounds of coffee beans being ground, people laughing and games of pool mix through the building as the atmosphere of excitement swells. Students, faculty, and community members gathered at Arusha Coffee in downtown Belton Friday night to enjoy music by up-and-coming singer Sarah Hurst. The concert, put on by pro-life organization Cru for Life, was to raise money to aid Gettys Resident Director Phillip Jones and his wife Jenny in adopting a baby from China. As a new event put on by Cru for Life, the concert has been months in the making. “We had the idea to have this event last semester, and we have a best friend who happens to be an awesome singer/songwriter who agreed to do it,” Cru for Life secretary and junior nursing major Carolyn Rice said. “It just sort of all came together; people used their different gifts and talents to really contribute.” Phillip and Jenny Jones have never experienced something like the concert, and were excited by the turnout. “This is the first time anything like this has ever happened to us, and we’re just blown away,” Phillip Jones said. “God is teaching us a lot out of this; He’s teaching us to receive well.…The fact that someone wanted to put on this concert is impacting and ministering to us in ways we can’t even explain.” Cru for Life president and senior nursing major Stephanie Taylor hopes the concert will bring about more opportunities for the organization to show their support of adoption while representing Christ and UMHB. “This opportunity was kind of an open door for Cru for Life, and we hope it sets off a domino effect for other people that are maybe looking to adopt or just to fundraise because that’s what the body of Christ does. Cru for Life is really excited.” Rice and Taylor met the Joneses at First Baptist Church Belton, and have been interested in their adoption process since it was first mentioned. “They talked about adoption for a long time, and then they actually started the process several months ago,” Rice said. “So just getting to be around them, hear their story, and just listen to the adoption process, we yearn to do something to help.” A friend of Rice and Taylor, singer/songwriter Sarah Hurst was happy to perform...

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Fun in sun at Lake Belton
Mar06

Fun in sun at Lake Belton

By Haley Higbee It’s 70 degrees outside, and students are loading their cars with beach towels and inner tubes. They are heading to one of the hot spots around Belton, Lake Belton, for some fun in the sun. The lake has been one of the biggest spots for UMHB students for almost 60 years. Students, like sophomore education major Kristen Cain, enjoy going to the lake for various activities at the many different parks on its shore. “My friends and I like to go tanning at the parks at the lake. When it’s like 75 degrees outside, it’s a perfect place to hang out and get a tan,” she said. Cain also said it’s nice to have a place off campus where she can go to relax outdoors. Many students are there catching some sun when the weather is just right. One of freshman finance major James Ewing’s  favorite things about Belton is that he and his friends have the opportunity to go out at night and just hang out around the fire. “We all got together after Stunt Night this past semester and had a huge bonfire. We went to a random park that already had the bonfire pit set up. All we had to do was set up the wood and start the fire. There ended up being a ton of people that came out and it was a lot of fun,” he said. Ewing also said that the bonfires have been some of his favorite times so far in his freshman year. Senior pre-physical therapy major Tyler Carpenter enjoys being out on the water. He has a friend who lends his boat to him and his friends for special occasions. “It’s always a lot of fun to get the wakeboard out and try and do a few tricks out there,” he said. He continues to explain the significance of the lake and the activities surrounding it. “When you can get a few people out on a boat in the beginning of the fall semester or end of the spring semester, it’s a perfect way to begin or end the year,” he said. Some students also like to get the tubes or water skis out and use them behind boats. The lake can be a fun place for those who use                                         it responsibly. Visitors can enjoy multiple parks, including Live Oak Ridge Park, Cedar Ridge Park, Winkler Park, White Flint Park and Westcliffe Park. At these locations, students can go running, hiking, rock climbing and much more. Sophomore marketing major Kyle White and his friends like to take advantage of what the parks have to offer. Most...

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Career Services offers guidance in job search
Mar06

Career Services offers guidance in job search

By Ashleigh Bugg For many students, finding a job that corresponds with classes and extracurricular activities can be a challenge.  Juggling tests, notes and homework while dealing with a looming pile of loans can leave even the brightest student panicked. Students want to have the coveted “college experience” and make lasting memories. That doesn’t leave much time to plan a profession.  This is where Career Services comes in. “Our main charge is to assist students in career planning, which we believe is a four-year process, not something you do a week before you graduate,” Director Don Owens said. Students and alumni are welcome to walk into the office on the second floor of Mabee and receive career counseling. Owens helps prepare students for interviews, internships and assessments that help them decide what they really want to do. Owens said, “I’ve noticed two things about college students. First, they don’t give themselves enough credit for the neat things they’ve done. Second, they don’t know what all’s out there. They kind of know what they want to do, but they haven’t been exposed.” The goal is to get students where they want to be in their careers by preparing them ahead of time. One resource that Career Services offers is Cru Connection, a website that links students to helpful resources and future employers. It even features local job listings. From appeals for nannies and teaching aides to photographers and worship leaders, the job search under Cru Connection has a large array of paid positions.  One woman even requested a “buddy” to mentor her son with special needs. Junior business major Joanna Leath was thrilled when she snagged a babysitting gig. “I went to Career Services, and they told me about Cru Connection. They called a couple jobs for me until we found one that worked,” she said. Students are able to set up an account by signing in with their Sadermail address and ID number. They can also walk in or make an appointment at the office and receive help finding jobs. For freshman education major Dana Williams, the teaching aide job she found on Cru Connection is not just a paycheck but a way to serve the community. “I think this job will prepare anyone no matter what you’re trying to be.  It takes away the selfishness when you see these kids really need help. Right now, they’re desperately seeking workers,” she said. Temple ACE runs an after-school program for high school students that is understaffed but pays well at $10 per hour. Staff members are in charge of tutoring students and leading enrichment activities like cooking or basketball. “These...

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Creativity inspires original team names
Mar06

Creativity inspires original team names

Whether it is intramural flag football, volleyball, basketball or a campus recreation dodge ball tournament, there are sure to be some teams with out-of-the-box names. Basketball is the intramural sport taking place now, and team names range from the Chinchillas, to the White Mambas, to No Game This Week, to the Post-Docs. To eliminate inappropriate names and  maintain clean fun, all team names are now reviewed before being confirmed into the league through imleagues.com. “We’ve had to take a stricter line on what’s an allowable team name and what’s not,” Director of Campus Recreation Sue Weaver said. “Anything that has negative undertones… we try to keep away from those.” However, that has not kept students from coming up with creative names. Weaver said that most students “just want a fun, interesting name that will make them stand out.” Each name has a story behind it that in some way reflects the team itself. For example, junior nursing major Taylor Frank tells the story behind the name of her intramural team. “It started when we got a group of friends together to play soccer last semester, and we were down to the deadline to make up a name and get it all together,” she said. “My boyfriend, Chase Covington, wrote the first thing that popped into his head. Everyone ended up loving it, and decided that now every intramural team we have, we’ll be the fighting Chinchillas.” The Chinchillas show the fun side of the often competitive intramural sports scene. “The name is important because it represents what we’re all about, just having fun,” Frank said. “I think it’s one of the least intimidating names you can get, but it amuses us and gets us excited. It also adds to the team spirit.” Another team, that consists of four members of the men’s golf team, named its basketball team the White Mambas. This was a nickname for former NBA player Brian Scalabrine that jokingly compared him to Kobe Bryant. Junior exercise and sport science major Justin Judkins said their name is a tribute to Scalabrine. However, students are not the only ones getting creative. A group of professors have their own original team name with specific meaning. “We picked our name based on a play of words,” exercise  and sport science instructor Dr. Jason Reese said. “There are two meanings here: The first meaning… is that everyone on our team has their doctorate in something. So our name came from this fact, plus the basketball terminology to ‘post-up’. Hence the name Post-Doc.” Weaver encourages students to create an imleagues.com account so that they can know about upcoming events. “We need...

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