What will you do Before You Turn 20?
Apr17

What will you do Before You Turn 20?

UMHB alumnus, author, and motivational speaker Lamar Collins spoke to students about his book Before You Turn 20 in chapel April 10. Collins has made history by becoming the first black mayoral candidate in Temple, Texas. However, his speech to students focused on five keys to success that he detailed in his book. The five points are as follows: Discover strengths Develop good friendships Maintain a positive attitude Discern God’s plan Discipline yourself “The gist of this book is to talk to, specifically, high school graduates and college graduates about the next phase of success in their life,” Collins said. He wants students to find their own strengths and apply those in their life. “When you feel bad about what you don’t have, you rob the world of the greatness that’s in you,” he said. “When you focus on the things you do well, you open up the doors of possibility to excel at what you do.” To illustrate the importance of good friendships, Collins talked about how captured crabs can never climb out of a bucket because when one gets to the top, another will pull it back down in its own attempt to escape. “Stay away from people who are like crabs in a bucket,” Collins said. “The second reason I tell you that story is to discourage you from being a crab in someone else’s bucket.” He finished his address quickly, going over the three final points from his book, reminding them to stay positive. “Life is a boomerang, and whatever you throw out, it comes back at you,” Collins  said. “That’s why it’s important to be a perpetually optimistic person.” He concluded the chapel service with an exhortation to the university. “So to the students and individuals here at UMHB I want to challenge you to be uncommon,” Collins said. “Here’s why I want you to be uncommon because success is uncommon. … So if you want to be successful, you can’t do what common people do.” In response to Collins’ thoughts, freshman business management major Austin Stecher said, “I liked how he encouraged everyone to find and act on their own strengths.” Sophomore exercise sport science major Daniel Villarreal responded positively to Collins’ encouragement. “Being normal is overrated,” Villarreal said. “The person who gets the job is the one who stands out. You have to go above and...

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Crusaders seal their mark on stadium by signing steel
Apr17

Crusaders seal their mark on stadium by signing steel

With the new stadium in its final construction stages, Crusaders had the opportunity to leave their own personal mark on the structure. Students, faculty and staff were given markers to sign one of the steel beams meant for the highest point of the new facility. Students from all over campus stopped by the alumni center parking lot between 8 and 11 a.m. to participate in the steel signing. Crusaders snapped pictures to capture the moment and keep the memory of the day fresh in their minds. Junior pre-physical therapy major Jacy Mullins shared the experience of the event with a few close friends. “I felt like it was a great way to leave my mark on campus, and it was something I will always remember doing,” she said. “I think students were excited to sign the steel because it was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Some of my friends didn’t care to join in signing (it), but the ones that did were really excited to do it.” To people who attend the university, the occasion was more than just adding their names to a steel beam. Some left Bible scriptures. Others left anonymous drawings. But the bottom line was  the students got to create their own little piece of history. This specific event was a rare opportunity. “There aren’t many times that a college does remodeling of their campus and allows you to do something like this. So, it was a way that we could all leave our mark on campus. Other people may never see those signatures, but we will always know that we signed that steel and can say that ‘my name is in the football stadium,’” Mullins said. But why would signing an inanimate object that will never be seen have such an impact on the campus? Mullins thinks this is a great way to leave a lasting legacy after graduation. “Students associated signing the beam as making history because our signatures are going to be on that piece of steel forever now. It’s something that other generations and other classes of UMHB can look at,” she said. Museum curator Betty Sue Beebe said the event is valuable to all Crusaders because it is a time of growth and progression for the university. Beebe is an alumna of the school and participated in the activity. “All of us who signed our names are a part of significant history of UMHB.  This is an important time for us to be students, faculty, staff and administration.  As time moves along, we can look back and feel good about our participation in this event,” she said. Director of alumni relations Rebecca...

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Playhouses built to host childhood memories
Apr17

Playhouses built to host childhood memories

Piles of wood, screws and soon-to-be clubhouse pieces lay outside the steps of Mabee last week for Cru Playhouses. The noise of power tools and laughter echoed through the quad as students came together to assemble scattered playhouse pieces. While the event gives Crusaders a week of an exciting, hands-on volunteer project, the houses built will represent years of memories for a child. “(Students) have the ability to build community within the different groups and have an amazing service opportunity,” assistant director of campus activities Jeff Sutton said. Cru Playhouses is a Student Life event that started five years ago to build playhouses for children of military families in Bell County. Since then, they have stayed connected with the university as the tradition continues. Various campus organizations do their part by sponsoring a playhouse. Participants are responsible for purchasing, building and delivering each house. This year, the project had 14 different university groups take on the project. Junior math major Lacy Hill came out to aid the resident assistants who sponsored a clubhouse, but stayed a little longer to help build additional houses. “I wanted to do it because I love little kids, and I think about how this is going to be some kid’s playhouse,” Hill said. “If anything was slightly off, I was like ‘No, we can’t mess this up. We need to make it perfect for them.’” Although Hill wasn’t able to help deliver houses at Saturday’s Reaching Out, she enjoyed the time she could spend building a memory for a child. The weeklong event wasn’t limited to the 14 groups that purchased a playhouse. Many students like sophomore exercise sport science major Taylor White, came on their own time throughout the week to help with the construction. “It’s really nice because not many military families have the opportunity to go out and buy a playhouse for their kids,” White said. “It’s good fellowship, and it’s all for a good cause.” Volunteers of Cru Playhouses didn’t let last week’s poor weather conditions stand in the way of building their masterpieces. Warm weather brought pristine conditions for Monday and Tuesday’s construction, but with Wednesday’s rain, the event was forced to move inside of Shelton Theater. Event leaders wouldn’t let the midweek showers put a damper on their plans. Sutton said their goal was to complete six playhouses that day, and the results were promising. “We are still going,” he said during Wednesday’s pour. Cru Playhouses were able to finish building outside the remainder of the week. While the construction process was hectic at times, Sutton enjoyed getting to see students give back to the community. He said,...

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Annual Scholars’ Day showcases research, enlightens campus

By Ashleigh Bugg The fifth annual observance of Scholars’ Day on campus is approaching. The day gives students the opportunity to display their research through papers, projects and artwork to the larger academic community and to receive constructive criticism, and will take place April 22. Dr. Trent Terrell is the current chair of the Scholars’ Day planning committee. “We’ve seen everything from robots…. to what kind of toxins are growing on public toilet seats. The diversity and quality of scholarly achievement taking place at UMHB is truly amazing,” Terrell said. Fifty presentations have been submitted, and 100 students and 30 faculty members are expected to participate. Senior Art major Holly Estes is eager to showcase her info-graphics based campaign on raising awareness for organ donation. She is one of four art majors presenting their senior exhibits. “Anytime I can share my art and designs with other people, I do; art is my joy…. Everyone has something to communicate and express, so I believe the arts is a way we can all somehow connect with one another,” Estes said.” Other topics include child advertisements and obesity, the effects of marathon training on cold symptoms, homeland security in Central Texas and spiritual abuse and its effects on spiritual health. Junior Christian ministry major Jackie Fuller is interested in gaining useful experience by presenting her paper on Philistine religion, war and origination. Faculty and students have been rewarded by the process of Scholars’ Day, and it has helped bring recognition to the campus. “People are consistently surprised by how much great work is happening at UMHB. I think it’s important that we celebrate our accomplishments and encourage future research growth with events like Scholars’ Day,” Terrell said. Associate Professor and Chair of Social Work, Sociology and Criminal Justice Dr. Isaac Gusukuma recommends that students include sections on problem and research, methodology, literature review, results, key findings, conclusions and references. Gusukuma reminds students that simplicity is paramount, and they should plan for conciseness and readability. The Townsend Library website has suggestions for printing and designing a research poster and offers guides for topics ranging from multicultural psychology to microeconomic theory. “Scholars’ Day provides a truly unique opportunity for our undergraduate and graduate students,” Terrell said.       “It’s exciting to organize an event that allows so much great achievement to be...

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Belton music venues provide entertainment
Apr17

Belton music venues provide entertainment

College students like to indulge their musical sides by heading to Austin or Waco for shows. Many do not realize that when it comes to concerts and entertainment, Belton is home to some of the best-kept secrets in the county. The college town has multiple venues perfect for catching live performances. Junior international business major Hunter Glaske is familiar with the local music scene. As a member of the Hunter Rea Band, he has been both an audience member and featured performer. “We go see concerts any time we can,” Glaske said. “We learn by looking at artists and try to figure out what they’re doing, how their sound is set up, stuff like that.” One of his favorite Belton venues is Schoepf’s Barbecue. The family-operated restaurant offers a Texas Music Series during the spring and summer season. “Every Thursday you can go to Schoepf’s and watch amazing talent,” Glaske said. “Pretty cool deal.” Senior Christian studies major Tyler Reed enjoys Schoepf’s outdoor atmosphere and small town feel.    “They’ve got a good thing going over there. That’s my favorite thing about Belton, to be honest, is Schoepf’s concerts,” Reed said. “They bring in some big names …. It’s neat because you don’t get a lot of UMHB people out there. It’s mainly just the local Belton people. It’s a cool atmosphere.” Another hot spot for local music is Dead Fish Grill right on the edge of Belton Lake. “Sometimes when they play music, I go across the lake and sit on the dam,” Reed said. “The sound travels really well, so you feel like you’re right there. That’s pretty neat.” Senior Christian studies major Laura Phipps considers concert attendance a large part of her college experience. “I’ve been to outdoor concerts, coffee houses, you name it,” Phipps said. “I know the music department hosts different concerts, and there are people on campus who play at (campus activities).” The university’s music department also offers shows ranging from performances at the Temple Cultural Activities Center to its C3 and Highways & Byways concert series. The Bell County Expo Center is another big venue, bringing in acts like Lady Antebellum and Three Days Grace. Coffee shop concerts are a college staple. A staff member at Bodega Bean said that the shop is working on obtaining a license to host live music and hopes to hold performances. Check social media for more information on local...

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Retired four-star general is distinguished guest speaker

Every academic year, Drayton and Elizabeth McLane host an educational and inspiral speaker on UMHB’s camppus. This year’s distinguished guest speaker was retired four-star general, Peter Chiarelli. As Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army in the Bush administration, he oversaw much of the the Iraq war. He currently serves as the CEO of the non-profit organization One Mind for Research, which dedicates its resources to studying mental illness and brain injuries. When the war in Iraq broke out, Chiarelli was challenged in ways he had never considered. He learned that good supervisors sometimes rely on the help of others. “I think it’s important that when you’re put in a situation as a leader that’s different than anything you’ve ever done before, you need to draw on the experience of those around you…. I believe that in order to be a good leader, you’ve gotta be a good follower.” The general has a passion for helping victims of post-traumatic stress disorder and is raising awareness about the heightened suicide rate in the in the armed forces. His Army background laid the foundation for his current work with One Mind for Research. He said, “I saw a suicide rate in the Army that doubled in about eight years …. I was absolutely dumbfounded within the first eight days when somebody came into my office and showed me a chart that showed by far the most prolific wound coming out of this war was traumatic brain injury.” Katherine Smith, a sophomore elementary education major, attended the McLane Lecture. She sees a lot of positive effects coming from the series. Smith said, “I think it’s a good thing. I think it gives us an opportunity to hear someone come and speak who’s done some incredible things in their lifetime and can be incredibly motivational for college students.” Smith was impressed that Chiarelli would  visit the university. “I thought it was pretty cool because it was really nice of him to take that time out of his schedule and visit us, knowing he’s such an important person,” she said. She also commends his efforts to improve the treatment of brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder. “I think it’s good. I think it’s important…. that even though he’s retired and everything, that he’s still trying to make a difference in the best way, he knows how. It’s inspiring.” Freshman education major Alana Filban was also in attendance. She believes in the cause the speaker is fighting for and thinks more awareness should be raised. She said, “I found General Chiarelli’s speech very interesting … post-traumatic  stress disorder is an issue for soldiers that...

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