Black Panther: The movie that’s taking the nation by storm
Feb21

Black Panther: The movie that’s taking the nation by storm

Black Panther, one of the most anticipated movies of the year, is revolutionizing superhero movies and carving a path for more movies like it. The film was released into theaters on Friday Feb. 16, with some theaters showing screenings the evening before to help make room for eager audiences. African American director Ryan Coogler oversaw the movie’s production, and the movie has a mainly black cast. Coogler focuses on bringing authenticity to the marvel cinematic universe by incorporating different parts of African culture into the world of the Black Panther. Coogler brought in consultants who are experts on African history and politics to work on defining Wakanda— a fictional African nation in the film that comes from the real Wakamba tribe of Kenya. The fighting used inthe film is based on African martial arts. With the use of real world cultures in a fantasy world, fans were ecstatic when news of the films production was released (IMBD.com). With preorder ticket sales and box office sales were estimated to be around $218 million in its first weekend (Nytimes.com). It was predicted that this would be enough to make Black Panther the fifth highest opening weekend in the history of Marvel Studios, and could break the current record for the President’s Day box office sales (comicbook.com). According to NBC, the film is now the first highest opening weekend for Marvel movies. On Jan. 10, 2018, after tickets were made available for presale, Fandango’s managing editor, Erik Davis, tweeted that the movie’s first 24 hours of advance ticket sales exceeded those of any other movie from the Marvel Cinematic Universe (Nytimes.com). This, however, came as no surprise seeing as how the movie’s teaser—not the full trailer for the movie, reached 89 million views in just 24 hours. For a short time there was even a “Black Panther Challenge” which was an online fundraising effort to help kids in Harlem see the movie. Ellen DeGeneres helped push the challenge and it blossomed to include more than 300 fundraisers aiming to send thousands of young fans to the theaters (Cbsnew.com) People all over America gathered to watch the film’s early release in select theaters nationwide, including Temple’s Cinemark. Junior graphic design major, Chriscina Lampkin, saw the early showing of the film with a group of friends, having preordered tickets over a month before. “I’ve seen a lot of Marvel movies and [The Black Panther] was good in many ways,” Lampkin said. “The movie impacted me positively because it is good to have representation. And the roles are usually flipped in every other movie, having a majority of the major roles being white with a...

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John Hancock: A unique professor
Feb21

John Hancock: A unique professor

In his time working at UMHB, professor John Hancock has become notorious for his unique characteristics and teaching style.      In his time working at UMHB, professor John Hancock has become notorious for his unique characteristics and teaching style.       For example if a student walks into his class late, they will hear commentary from him that provides a laugh, such as: “And that, class, is how to win 1 million dollars. Oh hello, I can’t believe you missed that.”  Junior graphic design major, Mikala Mulligan said, “Like a lot of other art professors I’ve known, he has that blunt sense of humor, but he doesn’t come off as completely sarcastic,”  “It’s very humorous and it’s fun to play along with. It’s a fun experience. Don’t come in with common sense, just don’t.” Professor Hancock was first introduced to the art world by his brother in college. After experiencing making a print for the first time, he switched to being an art major and never turned back. After graduating, he taught for a while as a sabbatical replacement at Oklahoma State University. Then Hancock worked as a commercial artist in Waco and later moved to the Belton area. See Art, pg. 3Working on his own for some time, he had grown close to those in the art community, such as department chair of the art department, Hershall Seals. While out grocery shopping one day, he bumped into Professor Seals.“I saw Hershall at the grocery store and he asked me if I still made baskets and knew how, so he said: ‘here, teach fiber arts,’” Hancock said. “I was an adjunct, so I’d work my commercial art job then after clocking out I’d teach for a few hours. Then I just stuck, and here I am now.” While at the university, Professor Hancock has made a lasting impression with many of the students. His humor is a mix of sarcasm and satire, and he can often be spotted around the art department in a dark smock, carrying his brown coffee mug. Even more iconic: his unruly hair. His caring nature is also widely appreciated. “It’s been a pretty unusual class experience, I’d have to say.” said Junior Graphic Design Mikala Mulligan when asked about her experience as a student of Hancock’s. “Usually there’s the syllabus and set times for things, but his classes are more of a learn how to craft things yourself instead of him having to tell you how to do it.” “I think Professor Hancock is an impactful teacher.” said Nan Dickson, former dean of the art department. “It’s just him. He is creative, talented, brilliant and caring. He...

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UMHB hosts annual  Writer’s Festival
Feb21

UMHB hosts annual Writer’s Festival

This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.The festival was hosted on Feb. 14-16 in Bawcom Student Union at UMHB. It is named after the journal, The Windhover, which has been around since 1997, according to the journal’s editor and associate professor of the English department, Dr. Nathaniel Hansen. Writer Suzanne M. Wolfe of England, who now resides in Seattle as a Writer in Residence at Seattle Pacific University, was one of the presenters. Wolfe’s writing inventory includes book, essays, and blogs. Wolfe is a well-acclaimed Christian writer. Her fiction novel, Confession of X, was based partially on her travels with her husband. Wolfe’s workshop gave attendees tips and pointers regarding fiction writing. The second presenter was Amy Peterson. Peterson is a writer and an adjunct professor at Taylor University. Peterson’s works have been featured in a wide variety of journals and her book, Dangerous Territory: My Misguided Quest to Save the World. Peterson’s writing can be raw and honest, but it truly encompasses her Christian background.   See Festival, pg. 3          Her workshop specialized in nonfiction. The third presenter was Thom Caraway. Caraway is an associate professor at Whitworrth University. Caraway is also the editor-in-chief for Rock&Sling, a journal of witness. He also founded and publishes of Sage Hill Press. His poems have been featured in a many journals throughout the country and his workshop focused on poetry. His reading was interesting and kept the audience entertained as he read some of his best poems. Still on the Hill was the featured musical duo, which makes do with a wide variety of traditional instruments from the Ozarks, such as the banjo, fiddle and harmonica. Still on the Hill hosted a writing workshop as well as a concert on Thursday night.  The addition of music to the Writers’ Festival was a great touch. Many students enjoyed hearing the band play their unique style of music. A slew of writers from all over the country to serve as panelists. Authors included Elizabeth Dell, Chris...

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Dr. Randy Dale campaigns for Bell County’s 264th District Judge seat
Feb21

Dr. Randy Dale campaigns for Bell County’s 264th District Judge seat

From being a Hardin Simmons graduate to spending two years in Afghanistan teaching law, to becoming an adjunct professor at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Dr. Randy Dale is looking to add Bell County’s 264th District Judge to his list of accomplishments. Dale grew up in Memphis, a small farming community in the Texas Panhandle. He graduated from Hardin Simmons in 1976, and received his law degree from St. Mary’s University in San Antonio in 1979. He also holds a master’s degree from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D from Texas State University. Dale believes that part of what made him want to become a lawyer stemmed from being raised by a former highway patrolman. “My dad was a highway patrolman before I was born,” he said. “You can take the person out of the law enforcement, but not the law enforcement out of the person. He drove a truck for a living, but I was raised by a highway patrolman. I had that kind of law-enforcement-follow-the-rules-be-held-responsible kind of mentality.” Dale began teaching classes at UMHB almost 10 years ago. Originally he taught Business Law for the McLane College of Business, but as of last year he is now teaching classes for the criminal justice department too. “I am a product of a small Baptist school. I love the kid that kind of school draws, the faculty it draws.” After teaching at UMHB for two years, Dale got the opportunity to go to Afghanistan with a private corporation to teach the rule of law system to Afghan government officials. “We held classes that we invited them to. We talked about evidence, procedure, and all elements of criminal justice,” Dale said. “They would come to our class because they would get $5 a day for going. For a three day class, 15 American dollars was a bunch of money to them, so they would smile and listen, but they weren’t going to make any changes.” Dale made his career as a trial prosecutor at the Bell County Justice Center after returning from Afghanistan. He also got his job back at UMHB. “I’ve always loved prosecuting. I’ve always loved being on the side that brings the case and tries to hold people responsible for their conduct,” Dale said. Dale is now campaigning for the 264th District Judge seat to replace former Judge Martha Trudo, who retired a year before her term was to end. Dale was approached by several defense lawyers in the area, who thought that he should run for the position. “I went home, talked to Melinda, and we prayed about it. The more we thought and talked...

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Campus hosts spring org fair
Feb09

Campus hosts spring org fair

By Olivia Robinson, Kaylee Blumenfeld, Taylor Powell, and Jacob Burlingame One of the benefits of the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor (UMHB) is the student life, specifically the student organizations offered to students. They are a great way to get plugged in on campus, meet new people and serve the Lord. Often times, it can be hard to discover these organizations and dive in. That is why UMHB holds the Student Organizations (SO) Spring Fair in addition to its fall organization fairs. Each organization manned a table with their representatives and information about their group during the fair at Bawcom Student Union Jan. 17, where approximately two-hundred and fifty students were able to walk by and survey over seventy student organizations that varied from a gaming organization called “League Cru Tespa,” to The Association of Black Students, and to Phi Mu Alpha – a music fraternity established in 1898. Representatives stood ready to answer any questions coming from interested students. “The fair helps organizations get their name out and recruit people and students looking to get involved can see all of their options,” sophomore Gabby Shbeir said as she represented the University Ambassadors table. Many of the tables even had flyers, candy or other treats to draw people in, but the fair was more than just informing students about the organizations on campus. It is also considered one of the many fun events that take place at UMHB. There were giveaways for students via Twitter, and Chick-Fil-A food was given to the first five students whtold Tiffany Wurdemann, the director of SO, about new organizations they learned about. Although junior Adrian Alvarado has been attending UMHB for three years, and knows a lot of the information that is offered at the fair, he continues to attend because it is fun. “I have always enjoyed walking around the fair each year,” Alvarado said.” It is really interesting and fun to see what each organization is doing on campus and I love learning about the new ones that form throughout the year.” “Over the years we have seen an increase in attendance and in the number of organizations on campus,” junior Haleigh Johnson, who helped plan the event, said. “By people becoming more aware of the organizations on campus, they are enabled to become more involved while also allowing them to create organizations that are best fit for them,” she said. “We have a wide variety of organizations,” Katy Hartt, assistant director of Student Organizations, said. She added that new organizations are always welcome. “The new organization deadline to apply [for the spring semester] is January 31,st ” she said. Apostolic Cru...

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Campus men rehearse Crusader Knights
Feb08

Campus men rehearse Crusader Knights

Practices are already underway for the annual Crusader Knights competition on February 24. Crusader Knights first began in 1993 as a fundraiser by the senior class. Since then, it has evolved into an annual competition where men are chosen to represent various organizations to compete for the title of Mr. Crusader Knights. Last year, the title was awarded to senior Alex Miller. Junior education Isaac Felan is directing this year’s competition, along with assistant directors Ben Roark, Daniel Martinez, and Tori Bradburry. “We’re in charge of deciding what the show’s going to look it…getting all the guys together and making sure they have a good time doing Crusader Knights.” The 18 contestants will be judged on their interview, unique video, individual spotlight questions, and campus vote. Felan said that this year’s competition is going to have a few surprises, and that he’s excited about seeing the audience’s reaction. “I’m not going to spoil anything, but [Crusader Knights] will be a little different this year,” he said. “I’m looking forward to seeing… the smiles and laughs from the crowd as a source of encouragement that change was good and that what me and my assistant directors [changed] was good for Crusader Knights as a whole.” Felan said that he feels a little weird being a young director. “Some of them are older than me. It’s weird being in a position of command when I’m one of the youngest in the room, but it’s encouraging that they’re listening to me.” Junior international business major Jacob Hindman enjoys going to the practices and spending time with the contestants. “[Practices] are like getting together on a weekend with a bunch of really close friends and sharing stories like everyone was there,” said Hindman, who’s representing Farris Hall. Junior multimedia and information technologies major Chase Mariott who’s representing the Junior Class said that he’s having fun working with the contestants. “I feel honored to be representing the junior class and UMHB,” he said. “It’s such a pleasure to get to be a part of this… We all have our own personality and quirks, and everyone just has a good time.” Be sure to come to Crusader Knights on Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. in Walton...

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