Women’s basketball second half rally not enough against Hardin Simmons
Mar01

Women’s basketball second half rally not enough against Hardin Simmons

A Sader Bells member cheers on her team with the Crusader hand sign during the UMHB women’s basketball with Belhaven Jan 16, 2021. Photo by C.J. Halloran/The Bells By C.J. Halloran Staff Writer The CRU women’s Basketball team fell to Hardin-Simmons University 71-64 in a hard-fought game on Saturday, Jan. 30. The CRU started the game on the back foot with the Cowgirls opening up with a 13-4 run. CRU’s graduate student point guard Taylor Kollmorgen looks for quick options as she saves a ball from falling out of bounds. Photo by CJ Halloran The Cowgirls didn’t let up either, continuing to lengthen their lead to as many as 13 points before the first half came to a close. The Crusaders stormed back to tie the game in the third quarter, thanks to a 17-7 run capped off by leading scorer Olivia Champion. Unfortunately for the CRU, they were unable to carry their newfound momentum into the fourth quarter. Junior Guard Alexia Martin shouts Instructions as the CRU dominates McMurry University. Photo by CJ Halloran Hardin-Simmons battled back with a 10-2 run at the beginning of the fourth quarter and brought their lead back to ten points. That proved enough to hold the CRU at bay, taking them to a 71-64 defeat. Champion was the joint leading scorer for the team, scoring 13 off the bench, which tied with the other leading scorer, Bethany McLeod. Sophomore Hannah Eggleston also put up 10 points for the team. Sophomore Forward Olivia Champion Puts Up a Layup as McMurry’s Sydney McHenry and her teammate do their best to shut her down.  Photo by CJ Halloran The CRU next faced an away streak against Sul Ross University and Howard...

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Men’s Basketball hit good stride as the CRU took first games of season
Mar01

Men’s Basketball hit good stride as the CRU took first games of season

CRU Steamrolls Hardin-Simmons for sixth straight victory By C.J. Halloran Staff Writer Josiah Johnson draws a foul from Belhaven’s Rian Shields to extend UMHB’s lead against Belhaven University. Johnson has made more free throws than anyone in Division III this Season and is second in free throws in all divisions. Photo by C.J. Halloran/The Bells When asked about the ASC’s  (American Southwest Conference) new rule of basing tournament qualifiers on win percentage instead of overall wins, Coach Clif Carroll was straight forward.  “It is what it is, but if you win them all, then they’re not gonna keep you out of the tournament,” Carroll said. “If you win them all, you’re gonna be champion. It sounds crazy, but that’s the goal for this team.” Though every coach aims for his team to go undefeated, Coach Carroll took that mindset seriously and has coached the Crusaders to six victories in a row. Their victory came by way of a dominating 91-65 performance against Hardin-Simmons on Saturday, Jan. 30. One of the main arguments that critics of the CRU expressed was based on the team’s slow start, but the Crusaders shut that critique down against Hardin Simmons. UMHB opened the game on a 16-2 run that gave them a lead that did not change hands for the entirety of the game. The CRU absolutely dominated the offensive side of the ball, shooting 56% as a team.  Josiah Johnson continued his hot streak, scoring 34 points and picking up 12 rebounds, while 6’5” guard Ty Prince also picked up a double-double, scoring 22 points with 12 rebounds. The Crusaders showed out on the defensive end of the ball as well, holding the Cowboys to 34% shooting and 22 turnovers. Though one would imagine the team and Coach Carroll to be ecstatic after such a huge victory, they were all business. Coach Carroll went so far as to say he was unhappy with the CRU’s second half. “Today, we relaxed,” Coach Carroll said. “We lost our focus [in the second half]… I would rather us keep two feet on the ground and two hands on the ball [as opposed to some especially acrobatic passing from the CRU in the second half]. “Acrobatic turns into 27 turnovers… you can’t win championships turning it over 27 times,” Carroll said. Though the comments may seem harsh with such a dominant victory, the team shares this mentality and with it comes a hunger that can’t be quenched by any individual victory. The Crusaders have their eyes on one goal: the championship, and they refuse to let anyone get in their way. Sophomore guard Kyle Wright looks for...

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Black History Month highlights those who have made a difference
Feb18

Black History Month highlights those who have made a difference

Beth Norvell studies the display featuring Virginia Leak, who graduated with the first integrated class at Temple High School in 1968 and graduated from the UMHB nursing program in 1979. The display is at the Musick Alumni Center and Museum at the Parker House on campus. Norvell is the Associate Director for Alumni Relations and the museum. By Malaika RandolphStaff Writer            There is an extra emphasis on Black History Month this year, especially because of protests that erupted after the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and other Black citizens. But there are also some important strides that have been made.            The brightest of those are that for the first time, a Black woman, Kamala Harris, was instated as the Vice President of the United States.  Harris also represents Asians, and she is the first African American and the first woman to have served as Attorney General of California, and the second African American woman to ever have been elected to the United States Senate.             “I think it’s amazing,” UMHB student Chloe Ruedas said. “We have a lot of work to do and a lot of progress to continue to make, but the efforts that we have taken are amazing. Especially for women and women of color. Even though we have so much progress in doing, it’s okay to celebrate what we have won.”            Ruedas pinpoints that not only did Harris win by becoming Vice President, but Black women won someone to represent them in the highest office.            “Having her as vice president, having someone who looks like us in such power is uplifting,” junior pre-med major Gilda Tchao said. Tchao is also involved in the Association of Black Students  (ABS) and Pre-Health Professionals Club.             Vice President Kamala Harris was in the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority when she was at Howard University. In her 2020 memoir,  she describes herself as what her mother expected her to be: a “confident, proud, black woman.”            Virginia Leak may have had the same inclination. She graduated with the first integrated class at Temple High School in 1968 and graduated then from UMHB’s nursing program in 1979. She is now an Educational Chairperson for the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), as well as a founder of Temple Colleges’ nursing program.             Beth Norvell, Associate Director of Alumni Relations of the UMHB Museum, said that Leak likes to guide and share her wisdom.            “When I interviewed her,” Norvell said, “she stopped and said, ‘now let me tell you about the Lord.’ She is so nurturing and sweet. She is vibrant.”            Leak mentioned...

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Crusader alumnus signs with former world series champions Washington Nationals
Nov05

Crusader alumnus signs with former world series champions Washington Nationals

Landon Dietrich sits with his parents, Chris and Melisa Dieterich, as he signs to the Washington National’s rookie developmental league, the Gulf Coastal League Nationals on June 22, 2020. He signed at home, due to COVID-19 restrictions. Former Crusader baseball player Landon Dieterich was drafted earlier this year to the World Series Champions, the Washington Nationals. In the history of the UMHB baseball program, only 8 players had been drafted. Dieterich raised the number to 9. The road to the majors is very long and full of difficulty, and to do so from Division Three baseball makes the journey all the more difficult. Most college athletes play merely to enjoy the sport they love for four more years, and to develop as a person. Very few actually make it to the next level in any sport. UMHB faced Schreiner Univ. in the home series opener at Red Murff Field, Belton, on Saturday, February 15, 2020. While Dieterich is only playing currently in a rookie developmental league with the Gulf Coast League (GLC), this is an important step that many great players have had to take. Dieterich already seems to understand the importance and difficulty of where he is at. “I am absolutely blessed,” Dietrich said.  “I realize it is a rare opportunity, and I just hope to make everyone proud.”                        Dieterich was never alone in his journey towards where he is today. Along the way he had many of his close friends and family to guide him and give him support whenever he needed it. UMHB and its students and faculty were also a big part of his support system. “UMHB was everything to my baseball career,” Dietrich said.  “It made me into the player and person I am. Everyone from coaches to professors. Definitely the best 4 years of my life.”  His years playing for UMHB mean more to him than most people may understand. “A lot of people do not realize UMHB was my only chance to play baseball,” Dieterich said, “No one else wanted to take a chance on me back then.” However, his job upon graduation from UMHB was not guaranteed, so going through the drafting process was stressful.   “[The draft] started off super stressful, and the stress just kept growing,” Dietrich said. “After all, this was a lifelong dream. So, eventually, I just had to let it go and trust whatever God had for me.” UMHB faced Southwestern Univ. at Red Murff Field, Belton, on Tuesday, February 18, 2020. Dieterich said that he had so many memorable moments while playing at UMHB he could not pinpoint the most memorable. “I think we would need...

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UMHB BSM and Burt Hall celebrate 100 anniversaries
Nov05

UMHB BSM and Burt Hall celebrate 100 anniversaries

Former BSM director Tom Hearon receives a gift from the BSM with his wife Bonnie Hearon. Another former BSM director, Shawn Shannon, stands in the background with a gift. Photo by Adrian Matthews. By Cole Garner Both Burt Hall and the Baptist Student Ministry celebrated their 100th year in mid-October 2020. A sign and balloons help celebrate Burt Hall’s 100 years. Over 20,000 young women have lived in Burt Hall over the last 100 years. Photo courtesy of Burt Hall. For the BSM, music played as students gathered to play games like cornhole, spike ball, and football on the Quad.  The socially-distanced party on Tuesday, Sept.13 exercised safety precautions needed during this pandemic as students enjoyed pre-packaged food and drinks (to make sure they were not touched by anyone other than the person who planned to eat or drink the food). One hundred years ago, the UMHB Baptist Student Ministry first gathered together as the Baptist Student Union, before its name was changed, along with its mission to be more ministry based. Burt Hall. The party had a special guest, Shawn Shannon, the previous UMHB BSM director. She worked for the BSM for 15 years, so she is considered to be an important figure in BSM’s 100-year history on campus.  Shannon dedicated her speech to the things that last and interacted with the audience by giving them the chance to answer: What four things last in life? Together, everyone came up with the answer that she was looking for, which up being “God, the souls of people, the will of God and the Word of God.” Gettys Hall Resident Director Eric Moore looks into the case in Burt Hall that commemorates the halls’ 100th anniversary. Photo courtesy of Burt Hall. After Shannon’s speech, the BSM lead team’s member Daniel Richardson handed a gift to present BSM director Daniel McAfee. The gift featured a thank you card from the lead team, which included seniors Adrian Matthews, Bethany Vassar, Katya Jimenez, junior Jared Poe, and sophomores Audrey Moseley, Daniel Richardson and Cole Garner. The gift basket also included gummy bears and beef jerky. At Burt Hall on Thursday, Oct. 15, students gathered for the unveiling of a showcase in the lobby of Burt Hall by President Randy O’Rear and his wife Julie.  The party moved onto the Quad for activities that included music, games and refreshments. Shawn Shannon speaks at the 100th anniversary of the BSM. Some interesting artifacts in the case from the last 100 years at Burt Hall included some old photographs of young women on the phone, sitting in the lobby in long dresses, and lined up in...

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Elizabeth Franklin crowned Miss MHB
Nov05

Elizabeth Franklin crowned Miss MHB

Elizabeth Franklin is crowned Miss MHB at Walton Chapel on Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020 as previous Miss MHB winner Molly Rodeffer applauds at right. Photo by Gavin Green By Reagan Murr Elizabeth Franklin won the Miss MHB 2020-2021 title at Walton Chaple on Halloween night, Saturday, Oct. 31. She was crowned at a unqiue Miss MHB pageant with social distancing in place. Franklin, a junior psychology major from Georgetown represented the student recruiting organization Search CRU. For 50 years, the annual Miss MHB pageant provided young female students at UMHB the chance to show off their talents while advocating for causes that are important to them, and make new friends.  Even with the challenges that COVID-19 presents, the pageant continued to play a vital role on UMHB’s campus this year. “It’s a chance to get to know people and be silly and dance,” said senior Miss MHB contestant Alissa Edgington.  “[Miss MHB] is a chance to meet new people and get yourself out of your comfort zone.” Kaysie Sparks, a former Miss MHB contestant, directed this year’s pageant.  Sparks’ experience as a participant created a desire to put her own spin on the event. As director, she was responsible for getting the contestants ready for their pageant performances. “People all the time think that we just throw the girls on stage and this is all stuff they do on their own, but we practice three times a week from 5:45 to 9 o’clock,” said Sparks. This training begins about a month and a half before the actual show. “We go over every detail of pageant with them,” Sparks said. “We practice anything from walking in heels to how they’re going to give their platform speech to the judges. They kind of do everything.” Eunice Michaelson, who participated in last year’s pageant, expressed how intimidating being the pageant can be at first. “It’s almost like syllabus week,” Michaelson said. “You’re taking it all in, and that’s kind of how the first week of pageant is.  [There’s] this long list of things to do, and it can feel overwhelming.” But Michaelson also said that once practices began, it felt much more manageable.  “It grew to be this really comfortable thing where we all knew each other, we all got comfortable with each other’s talent,” Michaelson said.  “We just kind of formed this bond.” Elizabeth Franklin was crowned Miss MHB on Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. Photo by Gavin Green An article in The Bells, “Miss Search Cru wins Miss MHB 2020” by Destinee Reinauer, highlighted the camaraderie of the girls as the pageant winner, Molly Rodeffer, was announced last year.  The goal...

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