Marketing Group Gets Chartered
Oct22

Marketing Group Gets Chartered

New student organizations are always popping up on campus. However, hardly any of those groups have helping other student organizations listed as one of their goals. But that is exactly one of the things that the newly chartered UMHB chapter of the American Marketing Association is planning to accomplish. “I’m excited about it,” Professor of marketing Dr. Mindy Welch said. “I think it’s going to open a ton of possibilities for the university… as a whole, not just the business school, not just the marketing majors. It’s going to be a big thing for the entire university.” Senior marketing major Alfred Rojas is the president of the new AMA chapter. Rojas took on the task of handling paperwork and really got the group up and running. “Honestly, it wasn’t too much of a rough process,” he said. “I picked a lot of good members around me as a board to start with. That helped me a lot. The great thing about it was that the business school has prepared me to be able to do these things. It was a process to get it done, but I don’t regret it, and I’d do it again in a heartbeat.” Rojas and his team hope they can be benefit other organizations in a positive way by helping them advertise and get their respective names out to as many ears as possible. “We want to go ahead and connect more organizations with students.… We’re going to advertise for them essentially,” he said. “By us helping them out, they potentially will get more people off the Quad and into their group. We want to impact the school as a whole.” With 20 members, the AMA chapter hopes to grow steadily. For now, the goal is to reach as many students as possible. The group will hold its first meeting Oct. 29 in Lord Conference Center at 6 p.m. “Hopefully, we can get a lot of people there,” Rojas said. “We’re trying to expand beyond the business school.… We want everyone to come in and figure out what marketing is and how they can use that to an advantage in their life.” Welch and Rojas and the other members are planning to take a trip to a large AMA conference in New Orleans next semester. Welch said it will be a great networking device for any interested in the marketing field. The organization is already involved in an advertising project for the event, A Night at the Museum. They are still looking for volunteers for the event, which takes place Oct. 24, at the Bell County Museum 6-9 p.m. For more info email arojas@mail.umhb.edu...

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Mascot: Stand up and get Crunk
Oct09

Mascot: Stand up and get Crunk

Students sway back and forth in rhythm to the music before the spectators rear back and collectively tomahawk their right arms forward yelling “Cru!” Joining the cheerleaders to head up the Cru Spirit Dance is one sporting the mask of a Crusader, the iconic Crunk. The word “crunk” may be a little ’90s, but the mascot is still alive and kicking. The student behind the mask has changed as a new era kicks off at the university, but Crunk’s idea and goal remain the same: to get fans pumped and to provide a little fun entertainment as well. “Yes we’re going to get people psyched about the game, but Crunk also serves as something to make people laugh while they’re watching the game,” Crunk said. “It’s the combination of getting people excited about the game and making people laugh….” Although the role of Crunk is new to this student, who must remain anonymous, he has experience in the trade. He said, “I kind of have a history of it. I did two and a half years of mascot in high school and then coming into college it was something I wanted to do and was just given the opportunity this past year.” He trained with the previous Crunk last year, who gave his heir some good advice about taking on the role of being the university’s face of school spirit. “(He) told me, hey man, don’t let that be a pressure, that you need to be like me. Don’t be like me. Don’t try to be like me because you can’t be me. I won’t try to be like you because I can’t be you,” said the new Crunk. The student is adding his own personality to the fan favorite antics of Crunk. “It’s not going to be the same mascot every single time. You’re going to have some of the same particular characteristics, but each mascot’s going to have their own identity,” he said. Director of Campus Recreation Sue Weaver was in charge of picking the heir to Crunk. She wanted the present Crunk to train with his predecessor. The task of prancing around in a heavy uniform is a difficult task and requires training and determination. “It takes an amazing amount of stamina and energy to do what the mascot does,” she said. “It’s hard to breathe in there (the costume). That’s another thing we needed, someone that’s really...

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Affordable Care Act set to affect students, employees
Oct09

Affordable Care Act set to affect students, employees

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, reached an important implementation milestone last week, requiring employers to notify their full- and part-time employees of the basics of the New Healthcare Insurance Marketplace option that opened for business Oct. 1. The ACA  will significantly change many aspects of the insurance and medical industries. On Jan. 1 all Americans will be required to have health insurance. Part-time employees are not eligible to participate in the UMHB-sponsored medical insurance, and the same is true in most other workplaces. This is why young adults, many of whom are not full-time employees, need to be sure they are included on either their parents’ coverage or find their own coverage by Jan. 1. If they do not, they will be subjected to a $95 penalty imposed by the IRS. Each year the rate increases. As associate vice president for human resources for the university, Susan Owens has been dedicating a lot of time to studying the legislation, learning how it will affect employees and students. Owens said, “I know how to talk the insurance talk.… I’ve been doing it all my professional life … but I’m having to learn it all over again with this new law.” Students need to know She wants students to be well informed of the different plans offered. Owens said, “Students need to understand that in 2014 they are required by the government to have health care insurance.  If they don’t currently have insurance, they’ll need to find a policy soon….” One of the provisions of the legislation already in effect allows dependents, regardless of marital or employment status, to stay on their parents’ insurance plans until they are 26. “Students who are still on their parents’ plans need to stay in close touch with their parents, who will likely receive their 2014 premium rates very soon.  In many cases, dependent premiums on parents’ insurance plans will significantly increase in 2014,” Owens said. It can also be explained this way: A young person might be tempted to think, “I can be on my parents’ insurance until I’m 26 years old,” but while the ACA requires that insurance policies offer coverage until a dependent’s 26th birthday, it will not guarantee that the company the parents work for will automatically continue coverage at the same price. Some workplaces are re-defining full-time and part-time schedules. In a letter to all full- and part-time university employees, Owens said, “In many cases, employer-sponsored coverage may be a better option for employees than the New Health Insurance Market Place coverage…. Premiums for employer-sponsored coverage will often be less expensive for employees than premiums for coverage through the...

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The Cru Eat Everything
Oct09

The Cru Eat Everything

From the minute students arrive at college, they are bombarded with a variety of worries that include classes, grades and food. In fact, food is one of the things that students worry about the most.  But they have plenty of options that won’t leave their bank accounts empty. The large assortment of food on campus will only grow once the new Student Union Building is complete and a Chick-fil-A is added as well. Hardy Hall and the SUB already offer everything from pizza to sub sandwiches to hamburgers to Wednesday’s chicken fried steak. Freshman Christian ministry major Hector Martinez appreciates the diversity of options available on campus. “The variety is pretty good….” he said. “I like the fact that we have the different cultures represented at the exhibition area.” He added that while he starts off every morning with chimichangas for breakfast, his favorite food served in Hardy Hall is the meatloaf. However, once students move from the dorms into apartments or off-campus housing, being on the meal plan may not be the most convenient option. At this point, students often begin exploring different avenues to whet their appetites. “I think the struggle is the age-old issue of ‘the poor college student budget,’” senior church music major Cameron Roucloux said. “When we’re paying … for our education, there’s not always much left afterward. I think that’s why a lot of students opt to go to Taco Bell, McDonalds, or Jack in the Box, because they’ve got a dollar menu. Lots of food for a little price.” Throughout his years in Belton, Roucloux has found a variety of non-chain restaurants. He suggests  students broaden their horizon when it comes to finding places that satisfy ever-insatiable appetites. He said, “Going on my fifth year of living in the BTX area, I would encourage underclassmen to get away from the chains and find some local places to eat at,” he said. “There are numerous burger places that are going to give you a … quality burger…. There are tons of Mexican places around here, and several Italian places as well.” Some of his favorite local eateries are Crow’s Hamburgers, Backyard BBQ, Black Meg’s and Italianos. “I’ve developed relationships with people who work at local places over my time at UMHB, and there’s a different level of a dining experience when you’re sitting down at a place where the staff knows you and what you usually get,” Roucloux said. “And I’m all about supporting local business, so I think it’s a great way to eat better food.” The list of restaurants that offer student discounts continues to grow. Students frequent Chick-fil-A, Schlotzsky’s and...

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Video Gaming Becomes More Than Just Pastime
Oct09

Video Gaming Becomes More Than Just Pastime

Left click! Quinn’s crossbow depletes a nearby enemy minion. D! A shield guards Quinn from the devastating blast of a turret. Q! Valor, Quinn’s eagle, attacks a nearby opposing Champion. The lane fills, but Quinn, Valor, and several other Champions, along with a plethora of helpful minions continue forward. Moments later, the enemy Nexus is destroyed. Victory. In the popular online game, League of Legends, it takes a team to emerge as successful Summoners (the game name for players). “This game is the ultimate teamwork game,” Junior accounting major Seth Michaelson said. He has been playing the game for two years now with his friend and current roommate Nathan Forester. “I started playing League of Legends Christmas of freshman year,” Forester said. “It definitely created some opportunities to build community … (to) have some good bro time.” For freshman John Henry Johnson, League of Legends has helped him meet new people. “It’s always something I’ve liked doing with my friends, and it’s kind of how I make friends a lot of the times,” he said. At the beginning of the year, Johnson posted on a group page for some of the freshmen to see if anyone played League of Legends. Johnson found several people who were interested in the game. At first, the group decided to make a team, which is compromised of five people. “After a while, we found more and more people (who) played,” Johnson said. They decided to organize a club. On Oct. 15, there will be an interest meeting for the new club at 8 p.m. in the McLane Hall conference room. Johnson said the club would meet to compete and enjoy playing both League of Legends and StarCraft. Johnson hopes to build camaraderie through gaming. Even in a digital world, friendships can flourish. Johnson has around 600 monthly active members who play on his Minecraft server. “A lot of our players are Canadian and British. We have a decent amount (of players) from Belgium, too,” Johnson said. “I talk to them all the time.” It’s a business for Johnson.  He started the server with his money, “but now it’s totally run on donations,” he said. Players contribute money so that Johnson can keep up with the expenses of running such a large server. “I have to pay for the website and all the domains, and I have to pay for one plug-in that manages the donations.” Altogether, Johnson said, “It costs about $160 a month.” Managing the server has paid off for Johnson. Literally. He keeps enough money to secure the server for six months, but coming into college, Johnson was able to use...

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A Monumental Witness to God’s Faithfulness
Oct09

A Monumental Witness to God’s Faithfulness

More than 19,000 students. Two universities. The same historic location. As the columns at Old Baylor Park stretched up into the sky on a perfect day in early autumn, guests of Baylor and Mary Hardin-Baylor universities took their seats in Independence, Texas. With a promising breeze and the sun shining on Academy Hill, the two schools had the privilege of gathering for a rededication service Sunday, Oct. 6. Each school selected a number of guests from the student body, as well as faculty, staff and members of the Baptist General Convention of Texas. Presidents of both colleges were present and spoke, as did Dr. David Hardage, executive director of the BGCT. Before the ceremony, Hardage had preached in the historic First Baptist Church at Independence. He explained the reason for the event. In May of 2012, the ownership of Old Baylor park was given to the two universities, which wanted to rededicate the columns and highlight their importance in history. Hardage described the key role the original Baylor and Baylor Female College, which later became the separate universities of today, played in the history of the Republic of Texas. “It was the Texas Baptists … that fought for religious liberty…. You are the result of that vision from years ago,” he said. Dr. Thelma Cooper is part of the original President Dr. John Hill Luther’s family. To begin the service at Old Baylor Park, she spoke with genuine appreciation for the occasion. With the trees framing the iconic image of the four pillars on top of the archway, those in attendance were reminded of God’s goodness. “We look back with gratitude to those who paved the way before us…. We are grateful to the two institutions fathered here today,” she said. 168 years ago, Judge R.E.B. Baylor and Rev. William M. Tryon’s charter for a new Christian education system in the Republic of Texas was approved. Each speaker at the event emphasized how influential this piece of history became. UMHB President Dr. Randy O’Rear spoke about the ways God has blessed the Crusader side of history. “Independence is the birthplace of these two great universities, and today we pause for a moment to recognize and celebrate God’s faithfulness to both Baylor University and the University of Mary Hardin- Baylor,” he said. Baylor University President Judge Ken Starr also took the podium to address Baylor’s success as a place of higher learning. “People are the important thing…. Isn’t that why we are all here—the students,” he said. UMHB Student Foundation passed out collectible coins bearing the image of the columns and each university’s name, along with “1845.” Guests also enjoyed...

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