‘Sader serves local ministry strokes of genius
Oct23

‘Sader serves local ministry strokes of genius

Stoke by stroke, the artist layers rich colors of paint on a massive wall. Alternating between sitting, standing and climbing a ladder, he works for hours at a time on a mural of Jesus flanked by his followers.   Sophomore graphic design major Edgar Ortiz embarked on a daunting creative mission after being chosen by Hershall Seals, chairperson of the art department at the university.   “Dr. Chuck Taylor … former UMHB faculty member and volunteer for Christians Touching Lives for Christ called me … to consider re-designing the old mural,” Seals said.   Taylor presented a challenge: Creating a life-like depiction of Christ on the wall of CTLFC, a local food and clothing bank located in Temple.   The organization wanted a visual representation of their group’s mission and decided to commission a talented, local artist. They then decided an image of Jesus helping others would effectively convey their own purpose, as well allude to the faith behind their cause.   Seals said, “Edgar Ortiz made his talents known his freshman year, so his talent and proven work ethic made him an ideal artist for the mural.”   After being selected by administration, Ortiz followed the requirements set before him, choosing an existing work to model his own after, and taking the wisdom of Seals to heart.   “We collaborated on a design … and worked together one evening to draw it on the wall, and Edgar took it from there,” Seals said.   By adding more dimensions, changing the background and elongating the piece to fit his work space, Ortiz made the painting his own. And though he didn’t choose the subject matter himself, he effectively expressed his own taste through the work.   “I did have freedom in what style I wanted to paint it. I’ve always liked to be as accurate and realistic as I can, but have also liked to use lots of color, with dark shades,” Ortiz said. “Although I painted another painting, I still had lots of fun in challenging myself to make my own version of an already-excellent painting. I learned a lot by looking at the colors in the original work and how they were used.”   Ortiz began the project this summer and continued to work throughout the semester when he wasn’t attending class or working.   After a total of 15 days consisting of three to eight hours each, the Bible story came to life.   The 80 hours of work paid off, and Ortiz expressed his happiness with the product.   “The most difficult part of the painting was getting the right colors for the faces and...

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Red or blue: What will Texans do?
Oct23

Red or blue: What will Texans do?

Democrat: Wendy Davis; Republican: Greg Abbott. Davis’ birthplace: West Warwick, Rhode Island; Abbott’s birthplace: Wichita Falls, Texas. Davis fought trials as the product of divorced parents; Abbott was sentenced to life in a wheelchair after a jogging accident. Texas’ two candidates are worlds apart, but both offer Texas perseverance.   Announcing his candidacy for governor in July of 2013, Attorney General Greg Abbott told the Austin American-Statesman, “Some politicians talk about having a steel spine. I actually have one. I will use my steel spine to fight for Texas values every single day.”   Senior political science major Robbie Cuadros agrees with that statement.   “Gregg Abbott offers much of the same that current governor Rick Perry has,” he said. “More jobs, mostly from the oil industry, and he is a strong supporter of the 2nd Amendment. These policies have helped make Texas a thriving economy and a desirable place to live.”   Republicans quickly judged Davis as an Obama cohort. One of her opponent’s advertisements showed a plaque reading “Governor Barack Obama, Texas,” as a voice-over alarmingly supposed, “Barack Obama as governor of Texas?”   “Abbott was smart to tie Wendy Davis to President Obama since his approval rating is at an all-time low, especially here in Texas,” Cuadros said.   With Election Day set for Nov. 4, political jabs from both campaigns have begun to intensify.   The Davis campaign was met with a barrage of criticism, even from some of her own supporters, for an ad attacking Abbott. It began with a shot of a wheelchair and proceeded to convict Abbott of hypocrisy for trying to limit the amount of damages plaintiffs can receive in personal injury lawsuits, when he himself won a multi-million dollar settlement from an insurance company.   Senior marketing major Ryan White has seen the occasional political punches both sides have given and taken in the campaigning process, but he said, “An effective leader can take jabs, but respond with truth.”   So far, both sides of the gubernatorial race have played the nasty game of politics.   “Overall, I think the American people are turned off by politics right now,” Cuadros said.   And with a state weary of politicians, especially those from Washington, it’s unlikely Texas will go blue.   Senior history major Joshua Hosack said, “I don’t think Texas will go with a democrat this year. I believe Texans, the majority of which are conservative, will stick to their guns and continue to vote so.”   That’s the general vibe on campus and around the state. The Fort Worth Star Telegram featured an article claiming Wendy Davis faces long...

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Cru Culture: Learning your vocab
Oct23

Cru Culture: Learning your vocab

A guy you met just last week walks up and asks you if you want to go to the meth house with him. Instead of letting your jaw drop at the audacity of a stranger suggesting you head over to the local drug headquarters with him, there’s a few things you might want to know.   With half a semester under your belt, or your graduation gown in this case, you’re probably into the swing of things on campus. But there may be some UMHB terminology you’re still unsure of, and to avoid the embarrassment of some upperclassmen jeers, it’s time you read up.   The Meth House   Contrary to the obvious, this isn’t a sketchy building for buying illegal substances. When you hear students on campus throwing this phrase around, hold onto your books — it’s not what you think. Christ United Methodist Church in downtown Belton serves free lunch for college students on Wednesdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. It’s a weekly occasion most Crusader veterans frequent. Make sure you to throw a few bucks into the donation jar on your way out to keep the tradition alive. The meals change each time, but it’s always home-cooked and delicious.   The Thursday Chick-fil-A struggle   In case you’ve been living under a rock or in a single room in Stribling, Chick-fil-A in Temple serves discounted meals for college students on Thursdays. Showing your Cru Card grants you two magical things — free waffle fries and a free drink. What more can you ask for?   Norts, Chacos and Crunilla   You’ve probably heard at least one of these slang words thrown around in normal conversation. If someone mentions their Norts, it’s not a cheap kind of candy or an eclectic hipster name. Instead, this term refers to the Nike shorts that unfortunately fill most college students’ closets.   Then there’s the infamous Chaco footwear. These outdoorsy shoes are great for adventuring around Lake Belton and accompanying almost any outfit — or so they say.   If you’ve been to a Cru football game and not had Crunilla, you’re missing out. This purple Bluebell ice cream was made specifically for UMHB and will change the life of your tastebuds forever. Don’t ask why, but it’s better than the homemade vanilla, probably because of the color, but mostly because of the Cru spirit.     Now that you’ve learned all the terminology, been dubbed a Crusader forever, made it to class without getting lost, and realized that parking on campus isn’t worth a ticket, welcome home,...

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Old music rules change their tune
Oct15

Old music rules change their tune

Music plays a big part in people’s lives, especially college students. People walk to class with their earphones in, and music is always being played at events. It’s amazing, the things that can be done with music.   Why has UMHB been cracking down harder these past few weeks than what we’ve seen in the past? The censorship that has been showing up is leading students to believe they can’t play music that has any derogatory or explicit language, even if the content is bleeped or replaced with other words. Even the instrumentals of questionable songs are banned.   Vice President for student life Byron Weathersbee said, “There is no new policy on music. We have monitored the type of music that is played publicly since 1845…. Our student life staff has recently had a discussion about how to do a better job of creating good playlists.”   If you went to the football game on Sept. 27, you might have noticed there was a change in the music lineup compared to previous years.   The football team isn’t allowed to come out to “Fireman” by Lil Wayne anymore, even though it was only the instrumental version that was played. Another song that wasn’t played is “Crew Love” by Drake because of the explicit content and foul language.   Even events such as Stunt Night, Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor and Cru Knights have changed lyrics to make performances fun or to add some Crusader spirit. But no more.   Senior computer graphic design major Lauren Theodore said, “The new rules have definitely made me look at things differently. I definitely want to uphold the reputation of our school, but also want students to feel like they have a choice in what a production looks like. I will always respect the administration over doing what I want when it comes to rules like this, because I really understand the reasons behind the rules.”   It may be hard to find a song deemed appropriate for events, but Theodore was able to give some insight about the situation for concerned students.   “… if you are patient and willing to meet with the administration about a specific song, especially if you’re passionate about it and feel that the message is more positive than negative, they will work with you…. The rules are ultimately to protect us students more than they are to frustrate us.”   An email came out earlier this semester with the updated handbook attached to it. Although there is nothing in the handbook stating any policy about music, much less an updated version of the music policy, it is...

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New group promotes faith through sports
Oct13

New group promotes faith through sports

Political unrest dragged the Karen people from their homes as their patty fields and barns were incinerated by the Burmese government.   Thailand native and sophomore exercise sports science major TJ Greeson once traveled to makeshift Karen villages nestled between the more than 8,000-foot peaks, which divided Burma and Thailand to share Christ through sports.   “These villages have schools set up for the children,” Greeson said. But often times, the parents were not so fortunate to make it to the refugee villages.   He continued, “Most of these children have seen their parents killed or imprisoned.”   In addition to hiking gear, Greeson toted his Bible and ball.   He was a senior in high school at the time in a sports leadership class, “which is learning how to be a Christian athlete,” he said.   Sports offered the Karen children a chance to connect with God and provided them a reprieve from the struggles they faced. Along the way, it taught them about one of the most important aspects of sports––attitude.   So, when creating a new ministry known as Called to Play, Greeson took to heart the belief that he can do all things through Christ who strengthens him.   “We bridge the gap between sports and Christ,” he said.   Greeson believes sports are a gift from God, meant for His glory.   “It’s all about attitude, godly attitudes, and how that can change their lives outside of sports,” he said.   Called to Play teaches biblical concepts to athletes like humility, respect for officials and positive, uplifting communication. The idea is that those attitudes benefit life’s other facets.   The ministry came to fruition over the summer, beginning with a conversation between Greeson and Junior Christian major Quinton Payton.   Philippians 3:14 surfaced as their guiding verse.   The New International Version says, “I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus.”   Greeson said, “God has called us to do something with our lives.”   He believes the calling for those involved in this new ministry is to disciple children.   Right now, the group is comprised of about 15 to 20 students, but has hopes to grow.   “We are making a difference here and that’s exactly what UMHB wants from its students,” Payton said.   Called to Play held its first soccer camp March 29.   On Oct. 25, they will host a basketball in the Temple’s Canyon Creek area. “We like to get students in the range of 1st to 5th grades,” Payton said, “just because they are ready...

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Davis vs. Abbott: A historic fight
Oct13

Davis vs. Abbott: A historic fight

Ever since Governor Rick Perry announced last year that he would not seek re-election for a fourth term, Texas students knew it would be a more interesting gubernatorial election cycle than usual, prompting hopes of more involvement among their peers.   Although polls favor Republican Attorney General Greg Abbott, a Democratic state senator from Fort Worth, Wendy Davis, famous for her hotly contested abortion filibuster, is fighting hard to become Texas’ first democratic governor in 20 years.   In the televised debate in McAllen,   Texas, which aired Wednesday, Sept. 24, the two went head-to-head on issues ranging from Ebola to abortion. A particularly hot topic, was border security, especially as it was held in the Rio Grande Valley.   “If the federal government will not act to secure our border, Texas must, and we will. And I did support the surge of DPS troops to our border,”  Davis responded concerning Perry’s contested decision to beef up security using state funds when the federal government has been slow to protectthe U.S. border.   Though Davis was adamant about her passion for border security, Abbott pointed to the fact that she did not present voters with any concrete course of action.   He said, “I’m the only candidate on this stage tonight who’s outlined a plan…. My plan ensures that we add 500 DPS officers to help secure the border…. I add 20 Texas Rangers. I add efforts to ensure public integrity. Plus, I provide tools and resources and technologies we need to better address the problems.”   Abbott also says he will go after the gang-related activity, which is a large source of the violence.   One of the three moderators asked about the Latin American immigration problem and concerns that it has spurred anti-Hispanic sentiment.   Abbott used this opportunity to highlight his 33-year-long marriage to a hispanic woman, saying, “If the people of Texas elect me to be the governor, my wife will be the first Hispanic first lady in the history of this state, and I think that is setting a new tone in our ability to connect with voters across the state.”   Davis responded to the same question in a broader way by saying, “Everyone in our state wants their children to have opportunities … and that we’re providing that for every child no matter who they are, no matter how rich or poor, no matter their race….”   Students are expressing frustration with their peers concerning their lack of engagement in the political     process this election season.   One in particular, senior political science major Loren Cowen, said, “There is no single issue that...

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