Students raise the curtain on new drama club
Feb16

Students raise the curtain on new drama club

The Crusader Company is one of the newest organizations on campus and was formed in the fall semester of 2015. The club hopes to help students prepare for work in show business. Whether students have experience or not, the club accepts them all. “We wanted to make the club because there was no drama club on campus,” said Danielle East, the club’s president. The purpose of Crusader Company is to help students gain knowledge of everything that would happen onstage or backstage, like using props, making costumes, creating a scene, and acting. The club will host workshops this semester to help students improve in a certain area and rehearse for upcoming plays. Club sponsor and supervisor Kathy Owens said the organization is a way for those interested in theatre to get their feet wet. “It will introduce them to the various tasks that theatre production require,” Owens said. “It will also allow like-minded individuals to bond over their shared love of theatre.” Owens likes the potential of the organization,” “It has the potential to be a wonderful force on campus,”she said. There will be many events this spring semester in which students can get involved. For their February fundraiser, the organization will be selling chocolate covered strawberries (two for a dollar) in the first floor of Bawcom on Friday, Feb. 12. The club will also be partnering with ROTC in March for a unique service project. Members of Crusader Company will pose as civilians, leaders, and military personnel during a training exercise put on by the ROTC. The opposing forces (played by the Crusader Company members) and the ROTC members will both be armed with paintball guns to simulate combat. The organization also plans to perform a small play for students and the community sometime during the semester. With the organization continuing to gain recognition, East said she has realized the need for such a club on campus. “I like how [Crusader Company] has gained a lot of feedback about how an organization like it needs to be on campus,” East said. The organization is currently meeting every other Monday in the Baugh Center for Visual Arts at 8...

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Helping Hands offers hope to Bell County
Feb16

Helping Hands offers hope to Bell County

lton Ministers Fellowship in 1995, Helping Hands has aided thousands of families who have fallen on hard times. Aid can be anything from groceries, items for new parents, financial help, and professional training, all at no cost to the participant. The executive director of the ministry, Rucker Preston, said it is important to have something like Helping Hands available in the community in order to solve social and economic problems that face the people of Belton, TX. “The reason we do what we do is because we believe Jesus meant what He said, so we are to follow His example and serve people in a very holistic way,” Preston said. “We do that through three different initiatives—relief, development, and advocacy.” Relief comes in the form of helping someone with their pressing physical needs like providing food, clothing, praying with them in the organization’s chapel, providing school supplies, or providing emergency needs for homeless families. “And then there’s development, which is where we work towards helping someone work their way out of poverty, save for the future to get a higher education, or find a job in our employment mentoring ministry,” Preston said. The director said it is also important for the organization and those who support it to be an advocate and a voice for the families who are trapped in poverty. Advocacy can come through talking to others about Helping Hands, providing donations, or volunteering at the organization. Senior social work major, Braden Wilson, said he chose the ministry to fulfill his internship requirements because of what they do for less fortunate families and the Kingdom of God. “I just love that Helping Hands is faith-based,” Wilson said. “[The organization] is supported by all different churches in the area who really work together to better the community.” Wilson also said that she likes Helping Hands’ holistic approach to helping each person who benefits from the ministry. “We ask them, is this helping? How can we improve this? What can we do better?” she said. “So, they really work for the clients.” Helping Hands is a 501 (c)3 non-profit organization, which means the services they provide are not funded by the government. They fund their charitable giving through a resale shop, donations from private donors, and monetary support from local churches. Senior social work major and Helping Hands intern, Michael Carpenter, said the work he’s done through the organization has not only helped needy families, but it has also helped him gain a unique perspective and experience that will help him in his future career. “I am a social work major and Helping Hands directly helped me by allowing...

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Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County
Jan28

Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County

The Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C. has presented the Bell County Museum with the opportunity to host the first traveling exhibit west of the Mississippi River. UMHB and the museum are partnering together to encourage students and residents of Belton to attend the exhibit. Dr. Timothy Crawford, the Dean of the College of Christian Studies brought the idea of hosting the exhibit to the museum’s curator, Beverly Headley. “We were honored to help out by bringing [the exhibit] to the UMHB community, the Bell County Museum, and the Belton area.” said Headley. “It’s a great reminder that we must study history. We need to understand not only what happened, but why it was allowed to happen. It raises fundamental issues about human nature, social responsibility and the obligation of individuals and institutions to act with a conscience in the face of unspeakable crimes.” The exhibit, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, discusses the medical and scientific studies of the Holocaust. This exhibit examines how the Nazi’s thought about genetics and used leadership and science to help justify persecution and murder. “This exhibit is a really good answer to the question why did the Holocaust happen?” Crawford said. “The terms ‘racially fit’ and ‘the cleansing of Germany’ was often used to explain to the German citizens why these atrocities were the right things to do.” The museum shows advertisements that were posted all around the country about how unethical it was for “racially fit Germans” to marry or procreate with “non-Germans.” And race wasn’t the only thing that Germany wanted to exterminate from family trees. Homosexuals, the handicapped, and the mentally ill were also considered to have “bad genetics.” A small number of artifacts are also located in the museum showing Nazi supporters personal items. “Deadly Medicine is a reminder that it has happened in the past and it is a history we should not repeat.” said. The exhibit is sectioned into two parts. On the first floor of the museum, guests can see sciences and experiments that took place before World War II began, focusing on creating the “perfect race.” Guests can also see the famous scientists that were used as inspiration for the experiments, such as Gregory Mendel and Charles Darwin, as well as the scientists that played important roles in the experiments, such as Dr. Ernst Rudin. There are many videos that play among the exhibit to show viewers what types of tools that were used, footage of results, and small biographies of different scientists. The second floor of the museum discusses what happened once World War II began. It depicts the victims of the illegal experiments,...

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Program connects students with career mentors
Jan28

Program connects students with career mentors

The Apprentice Belton program hosted their kickoff for the semester in Bawcom Student Union in the McLane Great Hall Jan. 21. The program is a partnership between Belton’s Chamber of Commerce and the university’s career center that provides mentors to students. Director of Career Services Don Owens and the chamber came to each other with the same idea about Apprentice Belton roughly four years ago when they heard about the Apprentice Austin program in Austin, TX. “It was certainly God’s being involved and us all being on the same page at the same time that made the program possible,” Owens said. Sophomore, junior and senior students must submit an application and a reference letter by mid-October to be considered for the program in the spring semester. Once a student applies, they will be contacted for an interview by the university and chamber. The university and the chamber then find mentors in each of the students’ chosen majors. Owens believes that students should be involved with this program so they can get a true feel for their profession before they walk across the stage. “I think students should apply to get a bird’s eye view of what it’s really like in that field,” Owens said. “A lot of us have these concepts of certain careers but we don’t realize it’s a lot of hard work. There’s the good, the bad, and the ugly of every job. There’s an old saying that says if you love what you do, you won’t have to work a day of your life. We want our students to have a passion and a calling for their career.” Thirteen students have been paired with professionals from the Belton and Temple area for this semester’s Apprentice Belton. The students will be required to meet with their mentor six times throughout the spring semester, whether it’s to discuss how the student’s semester is going over coffee or to shadow the professional on the job. At the end of April there will be a closing ceremony where participants will receive a certificate and they will be able to speak about their experience. “Through Apprentice Belton, I was able to gain a mentor in the medical field who has been able to help me navigate through my journey towards becoming a physician. While I also gained many hours of shadowing experience, what stood out to me more is the practical knowledge I gained through talking with Dr. Wooldridge about her experiences in the medical field,” said senior cell biology pre-med major and Apprentice Belton alumni Autumn Brewer. Junior BCIS major with a minor in Christian studies Ashli Adams is participating...

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On a mission Students take the Word into the world
Jan28

On a mission Students take the Word into the world

To those who are seeking adventure, and have a passion for sharing the love of Christ and fellowshipping with people from other cultures and backgrounds, mission trips can be a great opportunity. For those looking to actually join or be a part of a mission trip, but are unsure of how to go about it, there are multiple avenues by which to get involved. One way is to be part of a university-sponsored trip. The university’s Baptist Student Ministries (BSM) help students find the most cost-effective and lifestyle-friendly missions. They help students become a part of school-sponsored trips or get involved with Go Now missions that place students all over the country and the world. “I went on the refugee mission trip in Fort Worth at Camp Broadway and it was such an amazing experience,” said sophomore physical education major Lee Vasquez Jr. “It was my first mission trip and I was so blessed and thankful to start off there.” Vasquez attended a mission through the university over Christmas break and said that as soon as the team arrived, they could feel God’s spirit upon them. “As soon as the kids got there, we saw how much God has helped them through their lives and how much they want to become closer to him,” he said. “It made me so happy to see their faces glow and shine. It was an amazing experience and I can’t wait to go on another.” While students like Vasquez saw God’s hand working in university-sponsored mission trips over Christmas break, others like sophomore Christian studies major Kelly Carlin experienced God’s presence in church-sponsored mission trips. “I went to India and New Orleans. I loved seeing the different cultures of both places,” Carlin said. “In India, I helped run a Vacation Bible School.” Although the language barrier prevented Carlin and her team from communicating completely with the children, they connected with them through games and activities. Just a few weeks with the children impacted Carlin’s heart and worldview, she believes, forever. “[The trip] showed me that there is a lot of Kingdom work that needs to be done in the US,” Carlin said. “I encourage everyone to go [on a mission trip] at least once and see how the other half-lives and to experience the way God moves throughout the world.” Students who didn’t get the chance to trek through foreign cities and bring the Gospel to unreached peoples over Christmas break can take advantage of the opportunity to be a part of Beach Reach – a spring break mission trip organized by the Baptist Student Ministries. Every year, a group of UMHB students...

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Campus discusses concealed carry
Dec08

Campus discusses concealed carry

The university hosted an open forum on Nov. 19 to discuss Senate Bill 11. The Bill states that anyone who has a Concealed Handgun License can open carry on campus. It is mandatory for public universities, however for private universities it is optional. UMHB has the option to completely follow the bill, partially follow it, or disregard it completely. The university currently allows handguns on campus if you have a CHL. However, it must stay in your car. Dr. Steve Theodore, Senior Vice President for Administration & Chief Operating Officer, and Gary Sargent, Chief of Police, held the forum in the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center. The rules of the forum? Raise your hand, use the microphone, introduce yourself, and address the panel. “This is not a debate between you and us,” Theodore said. “The administration has no opinion on it right now. Please state your opinion clearly, be brief, and be respectful. We’re all adults here.” The forum started off with freshman social work major, Grace Scott, mentioning the CHL process and what she has observed. “My father is a CHL instructor. [The CHL students] are there to protect themselves and their families,” she said “I don’t think we should put a limitation on this law.” Indy Henderson, a DPT major, took the mic and brought up the topic of police response time. “The average time for the police to arrive at the scene is three to five minutes,” he said. “A lot of people can die in that time”. Dr. Theodore responded to the student’s concerns by explaining the police force evaluation process and the presence level of police on campus. “We always evaluate our police department. We have 24/7 security or police on campus. Now are we going to have a police officer in every building? Probably not. But we do like to evaluate.” Soon after, Colton Hendrick, a junior church music major asked about the current safety regulations regarding tasers and pepper spray. Mediator’s explained that the UMHB Police offer self-defense classes, and mace, stun guns and knives (depending on the size) are allowed on campus. Hope Herring, a mental health graduate student, and a survivor of the Fort Hood mass shooting in 2014, spoke up about her experiences and what she has learned from them. “I’ve been a CH holder for four years and in the military for six years. It is vital for Senate Bill 1 to be at UMHB. I am a survivor from the Fort Hood shooting. The entire incident took 15 minutes. Three were killed, 15 wounded. Out of the 16 people who were military trained, only two had...

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