Elizabeth Franklin crowned Miss MHB
Nov05

Elizabeth Franklin crowned Miss MHB

Elizabeth Franklin is crowned Miss MHB at Walton Chapel on Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020 as previous Miss MHB winner Molly Rodeffer applauds at right. Photo by Gavin Green By Reagan Murr Elizabeth Franklin won the Miss MHB 2020-2021 title at Walton Chaple on Halloween night, Saturday, Oct. 31. She was crowned at a unqiue Miss MHB pageant with social distancing in place. Franklin, a junior psychology major from Georgetown represented the student recruiting organization Search CRU. For 50 years, the annual Miss MHB pageant provided young female students at UMHB the chance to show off their talents while advocating for causes that are important to them, and make new friends.  Even with the challenges that COVID-19 presents, the pageant continued to play a vital role on UMHB’s campus this year. “It’s a chance to get to know people and be silly and dance,” said senior Miss MHB contestant Alissa Edgington.  “[Miss MHB] is a chance to meet new people and get yourself out of your comfort zone.” Kaysie Sparks, a former Miss MHB contestant, directed this year’s pageant.  Sparks’ experience as a participant created a desire to put her own spin on the event. As director, she was responsible for getting the contestants ready for their pageant performances. “People all the time think that we just throw the girls on stage and this is all stuff they do on their own, but we practice three times a week from 5:45 to 9 o’clock,” said Sparks. This training begins about a month and a half before the actual show. “We go over every detail of pageant with them,” Sparks said. “We practice anything from walking in heels to how they’re going to give their platform speech to the judges. They kind of do everything.” Eunice Michaelson, who participated in last year’s pageant, expressed how intimidating being the pageant can be at first. “It’s almost like syllabus week,” Michaelson said. “You’re taking it all in, and that’s kind of how the first week of pageant is.  [There’s] this long list of things to do, and it can feel overwhelming.” But Michaelson also said that once practices began, it felt much more manageable.  “It grew to be this really comfortable thing where we all knew each other, we all got comfortable with each other’s talent,” Michaelson said.  “We just kind of formed this bond.” Elizabeth Franklin was crowned Miss MHB on Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020. Photo by Gavin Green An article in The Bells, “Miss Search Cru wins Miss MHB 2020” by Destinee Reinauer, highlighted the camaraderie of the girls as the pageant winner, Molly Rodeffer, was announced last year.  The goal...

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The impact of COVID-19 on UMHB’s nursing program
Oct05

The impact of COVID-19 on UMHB’s nursing program

By Regan Murr The spread of COVID-19 has had a dramatic effect across the globe and, most noticeably, on the medical field.  Nurses stand on the front lines in the fight against the coronavirus, often at great personal risk, as they struggle to combat the pandemic.  This outbreak, coupled with an ongoing nursing shortage in the United States, has profoundly impacted the environment that future nursing students must confront after they graduate.  At the University of Mary Hardin- Baylor, students in the nursing program face having to adapt to many changes in learning methods and class structures, while also preparing for their future careers in a profession that continues to face unique challenges. Molly Radar, a senior nursing student at the university, plans to work in pediatrics after her graduation next spring.  She describes the transition to CRUflex classes this semester as “cool, but…wild and weird.” “It’s crazy that I will be starting a job, maybe, during a global pandemic,” said Radar.  “It’s kind of terrifying.” Junior UMHB nursing major Hannah Glass studies in between classes for an upcoming exam in the Townsend Memorial Library on campus in September 2020. Photo by Malaika Randolph At the same time, the pandemic has highlighted, perhaps more than ever, the need for more nurses in the workforce.  According to the American Nurses Association, there is projected to be far more nursing jobs available as compared to any other profession in 2022.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that 1.1 million new registered nurses will be needed by 2022 to replace retirees and to avoid a continued shortage. When asked whether or not she was concerned about her future career during COVID-19, senior nursing student Sarah Hughes said: “No, because we’re needed.” Hughes also stated that she felt ready to enter the profession. “As nurses, we’re going to be dealing with a whole lot of infectious stuff all the time,” Hughes said.  “This is just a new infectious disease that we have to deal with.” Junior UMHB nursing major Hannah Glass studies in between classes for an upcoming exam in the Townsend Memorial Library on campus in September 2020. Photo by Malaika Randolph Nursing schools may also be facing dramatic fluctuations in applications due to COVID-19.  According to Ilana Kowarski’s  article in  U.S. News and World Report , “How coronavirus affects nursing school admissions,”  universities such as Villanova in Pennsylvania and Regis College in Massachusetts, have witnessed an increase in nursing school applications, which may be due to the pandemic. Still, it is possible that safety concerns may result in fewer applicants to nursing schools across the board, according to Kowarski’s article.  Only...

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ROTC’s Color Guard at the Salute to America at Crusader Stadium
Oct05

ROTC’s Color Guard at the Salute to America at Crusader Stadium

The United States Flag unfurls in the wind during The Salute to America on Friday, Sept. 11, which honored the events of 9/11 on the Crusader Stadium field. After the invocation by senior ROTC Cadet Stone Klingaman, ROTC’s Color Guard helped kick off the event along with the Black Shirt CRU Spirit Band on the field. L-R are cadets Alexia Brown, Jasmine Taylor (holding the U.S. Flag), Jami Hayden (holding the Texas flag), and Kayla Nielsen. Photo by Cadet Alexandria...

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CRUflex –  a new multimodal way of learning: Class in person, online with Zoom,  or with video tapes of classes
Oct05

CRUflex – a new multimodal way of learning: Class in person, online with Zoom, or with video tapes of classes

By Cole Garner – Editor-in-Chief and Dakota Powell – Staff Writer Students wearing masks listen and take notes as Dr. Kerry Owens teaches his Public Speaking class in Davidson Hall Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020. Students L-R are: pre-nursing major and cross country athlete Justin Miller; ROTC pre-nursing sophomore Bernadette Rivera; and freshman Christian studies major Ashley Moore. The students look close together here in this photos as the photo is compressed with a long lens. However these students’ desks are at least 6 feet apart. Photo by Rebecca McEntee This year, the University of Mary-Hardin Baylor needed to try to do things a little differently. After COVID-19 caused UMHB and other universities across the country to move their classes to an online format last spring, UMHB’s strategists knew that they would have to make the fall semester look very different. In doing that, UMHB started using a new way of learning. This is what the university now calls CRUflex. CRUflex is based on a hybrid learning approach that offers multiple ways to complete a course. Students can either attend class in person, or they can attend class virtually, or, they can watch a video of the taped class at a more convenient time for them. They can even combine their modes of accessing class and information, such as when reviewing a taped class they have already attended or viewed. All classes are videotaped with a program named Panopto. So most professors are teaching live on campus to some students in their seats in the classroom, while some of their other students attend with their computer desktops in the program known as Zoom. All of it, class in the classroom with students in attendance, along with students’ faces on computer tops through Zoom, is videotaped during class time. The video tape is then placed into a module reachable through myCampus courses for the week, so that students can access classes through their personal myCampus entry. Dr. Kerry Owens talking to his students in his Public Speaking class in Davidson Hall on Tuesday, Sept. 22. Pre-nursing major and cross country athlete Justin Miller listens in foreground. Photo by Rebecca McEntee Only a select number of students can attend each classroom because students must social distance.  Those who attend sit in desks that are placed at least six feet apart, which allows fewer students in each classroom. Students who may attend are rotated if needed, depending on the number of students and the room size, so sometimes students must alternatively attend class by tuning in with Zoom. Since attendance is not required, but encouraged when possible, faculty assign ARA’s (Academically Related Assignments)...

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Flu shots now available on campus!
Sep24

Flu shots now available on campus!

It is already time to get a flu shot, and because of COVID, it is especially important to take care that this year, as soon as possible. With COVID-19 being one respiratory illness we have to be vigilantly guard against, having the risk of a second respiratory disease infecting people at the same time presents and even worse scenario. This possibility of two respiratory diseases infecting people either at once or in tandem, affects individuals as well as the collective on campus and all of us at home with our families and loved ones. It also presents, with more people sick from two diseases, the chance that hospitals will be inundated this season. To help get better control over our health this season for yourself and others, you can schedule your flu shot with Nurse Debbie  (Rosenberger, CSN, RN-BC) in Health Services in the Mabee Student Success Center building on the third floor. She has provided the following information about getting the shot: Flu shots are now available for $20 – cash or check; while supplies last. To get the shot, please Email healthservices@umhb.edu with your ID number and date and time at which you would like to have an appointment, and you will receive an email confirmation.  (There are NO appointments between noon-1pm daily.)  Bring your filled out flu shot consent form and have your funds ready. Again, BRING your completed form and $20 with you to the appointment.   Also, be sure to maintain social distancing and wear your mask.  If you are ill – do NOT keep your appointment. Nurse Debbie will need you to have already filled out and signed a consent form for the shot. You can download it and print it out, and sign and again, be sure to take it with you.  It can be found here. The flu shot is especially important this year because the COVID virus will still be something any of us can catch, and we have been warned of a second wave of infections. Therefore, we need to be sure we are protected from at least one of these diseases that we can already control with a vaccine. Nurse Debbie says another reason to get the flu shot this season is that, as the CDC advises points out, it prevents suspicions of COVID from putting more people in quarantine and/or in isolation for 10-14 days, which can be a long time when trying to complete a semester of school.  Although some people feel that they have flu symptom after taking the shot, that is because the antibodies are working to protect the body from the more serious outbreak. Most people...

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Super Tuesday sweeps the nation
Mar05

Super Tuesday sweeps the nation

After months of campaigning, the primaries came to Texas. Texas is known to be a Republican state, there is room for Democrats’ presence to grow in the future. Due to the high population growth of Texas, Democrats look to take as many votes as they can from the state in 2020. The question going into the presidential election is simple. Is Texas big enough for both Democrats and Republicans? Let’s look at the facts. Progressives such as Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have been running on a platform of Medicare for All. Some Texans may place hope for such health plans. According to the United States Census Bureau, 186,000 Texans lost their health insurance, leaving the total population of Texas that was without insurance at 17.7% of the population in 2018. This was a rise from the 17.3% of Texans without insurance in 2017. Texas leads the rest of the states with the most people uninsured, making it possible that Texas could flip parties in the 2020 presidential race. Because of the rise of Democratic support in Texas, Democrats have started to target Texas in their campaign destinations. Candidates Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and former candidate Mike Bloomberg all visited Texas in the week before the primaries. This marked Texas as an important spot in the primaries. Leading the pack of candidates in visits, Joe Biden visited Texas 16 times since the start of 2019; Donald Trump was right behind him with 15 visits. Candidates such as Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar dropped out of the race in the days prior to Super Tuesday. These former candidates, along with former congressman Beto O’Rourke, joined together at Joe Biden’s Texas rally on Monday, March 2 in Dallas to announce their support for the candidate. It seems that their support was vital, as Biden took not just Texas, but nine other states out of the 14 states that participated in Super Tuesday. Sanders took the most important spot: California. On the other side, incumbent Donald Trump took all 14 of the states, bringing his Republican delegate count up to 833. Republican challenger Bill Weld did not increase delegates whatsoever, leaving him at a total of one. De La Fuente, another Republican challenger, had no delegates by the night. The Bells polled 50 random people outside of Bawcom Student Union on Monday, March 2, from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. It was determined that while the majority of the campus is conservative, there was a somewhat large population who planned on voting Democrat. According to our polling of the 50 random people, 21 of the students either planned on voting,...

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