ROTC Photo Gallery
Nov13

ROTC Photo Gallery

Cadet Ashley Matta gives a hand signal to Cadet Nathan Gammage. Photo by Lauren Lum Photo by Lauren Lum Cadets Nicholas Cormier and Valerie Boyd discuss tactics during the ROTC Cadets’ Performance Lab on Wednesday, Oct. 17 at Peacock Ranch on the UMHB campus. Photo by Lauren Lum Cadet Alexandra Dalle looks over her shoulder during a drill. Photo by Lauren Lum Photo by Lauren Lum Staff Sgt. William Thomas guides cadets, left to right: Victoria Bella and Stone Klingaman. Photo by Sarah Ifft Cadet Joel Loua gives instructions to Cadet Ashton Bentley during the ROTC cadets’ performance lab on Wednesday, Oct. 17 at Peacock Ranch on the UMHB campus. Photo by Lauren Lum Cadet Joel Loua (right) instructs Cadet Robert Stafford (left). In far background, Cadet Amber Delano gives a hand signal (left), while Cadet Ryan Trenholm watches (right). Photo by Sarah...

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UMHB’s ROTC program trains future heroes
Nov13

UMHB’s ROTC program trains future heroes

This October marks the 10-year anniversary of the UMHB Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). The program develops students into commissioned U.S. Army officers while they are earning their degree. “Once you graduate, you will commission as a second lieutenant, and then you will move up through the ranks and… given everything is done correctly, you should hit captain in about four or five years,” Capt. Charles Wilson, assistant professor of military science, said. UMHB’s program has approximately 30 cadets. They work in conjunction with Texas A&M Central Texas’ (TAMU-CT) ROTC program, which has approximately 50 cadets. ROTC offers scholarships to cadets. The two-, three- and four-year scholarships pay for tuition and provide a stipend for books. When a student accepts the scholarship, they must sign a contract that states they will finish ROTC to become commissioned officers. ROTC is divided into four segments: Military Science (MS) Level 1 (freshmen), 2 (sophomores), 3 (juniors), and 4 (seniors). MS Level 1 cadets learn rank structure, customs and courtesies such as saluting and standing at attention, and time management. MS Level 2 cadets learn how to function as a team, and they learn land navigation. MS Level 3 cadets learn how to manage large groups of personnel, while receiving guidance from the MS Level 4 cadets. They are put into more key leadership positions to display what they’ve learned during their time in ROTC. MS Level 4 cadets learn how to lead and manage on a higher level, and prepare to commission into the Army upon graduation. Students in the ROTC program can study any major. The classes are typically held on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays. On Wednesdays, cadets participate in a lab portion of the program, where they will put what they’ve been learning into practice. Labs are usually done with the TAMU-CT cadets. ROTC Cadets have Physical Training (PT) Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 7 a.m. During PT, cadets do cardio exercises, weight lifting, and ruck marching with 35+ pounds. ROTC cadets do not have to go to basic training like enlisted soldiers. “These individuals are coming out as officers, so the information that they learn here is a condensed version of what they learn at basic training, but [cadets are] not learning how to follow; they’re learning how to be leaders,” Captain Wilson said. “They have to have the same core understanding of basic Army [doctrine] as privates, but leaving out of here they’re going to be officers at the end of the day, so this 21, 22-year-old female or male is going to be in charge of this 45-year-old sergeant that’s been in the military...

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Homecoming Photo Gallery
Nov06

Homecoming Photo Gallery

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The Disney College Program: a look behind the mouse ears
Oct10

The Disney College Program: a look behind the mouse ears

Do you want to have fun? Want to live in Disney World for a whole semester? Want to get college credit? Then the Disney College Program is the internship for you. This program lets you live at Walt Disney World or Disneyland for a whole semester. You get to work at the park and you also get paid as well. There are a lot of different departments that you can work with. You can work with attractions or transportation, or, you can work as a convention guide, custodian, or photographer, to name a few positions. A student named Kylie Wittmer, who was a film and television major when she participated in the program, said positive things about it. “The best things about the program are the friends you make while you’re there and being able to call Disney World your home,” Wittmer said. “People will tell you that the friends you make at Disney World are lifelong friends and you may think that sounds dramatic but they are right, you get to know these people at the happiest place on earth. You will get to know each park like the back of your hand and really never get sick of it. I can’t see advertisements for Disney World anymore without being sad that I’m not there.“ During a Disney College Program information meeting at UMHB on Sept. 26, Assistant Professor (Management) Chris Langford had a similar sentiment, because he loved his time at Disney and he wants students to experience the program. ”Going to the Disney College Program was one of the top five experiences of my life,” Langford said. “I worked at Splash Mountain and me and my group of friends were called Splash Trash. After the program we used to go on trips to Dis- ney World.” Film studies major Alyssa Silva was accepted into the Disney College Program for the spring 2019 semester with a custodial position. “I applied the day applications came out in August,” Silva said. “Within two weeks, I received an email with a link to the second step of the application which was a web based interview. As soon as I finished the web-based interview, I was informed I made it to the last step, the phone interview. I scheduled my phone interview and the day of I was super nervous, but I feel as though I did well and was confident. Then, after four long weeks of waiting, I got the magical email saying I got accepted into the DCP! I was at a stunt night rehearsal when I found out and had tears of joy. I then called my mom...

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Family Weekend gives parents a chance to see their students, meet professors
Oct10

Family Weekend gives parents a chance to see their students, meet professors

Family Weekend on Sept. 28-29 gave students’ families a chance to see what they’ve been up to since they started their first month at school at UMHB. Parents and siblings met and talked with professors and campus staff, while they also attended various sporting events and participated in university traditions. Families began to arrive on campus on Friday afternoon. At this time, multiple events were occurring simultaneously, creating a loose schedule for families and their students to join in on. After registering with Campus Activities Board where families received parent weekend T-shirts, they had the opportunity to head over to the Musick Alumni Center for a tour of the University museum. This museum shares the history of the university and houses all sorts of paraphernalia from students and campus. A meet and greet was held on the second floor of Bawcom Student Union where parents were able to talk with President O’Rear’s Council representatives and different leaders of Student Organizations. From here, students and their families were given the opportunity to have quality time together and fellowship over dinner, and to visit students’ dorm rooms. This time was special to freshman business management major, Kat Primm, as she shared about the time she got to spend one-on-one with her family. “My favorite part would probably be when my parents and I walked around the Belton square and saw some cute, classic shops like a bookstore and a hand-made soap shop.” The ring ceremony was held in the Sue and Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center at 7 p.m., in which seniors were presented with their class ring. Afterwards, families joined the student body in an energetic display of school spirit at the Friday night pep rally in preparation for the multiple Cru sporting events that were to take place on Saturday. Here, the Blackshirt Cru Spirit Band played upbeat melodies while the Sader Belles and Cru Cheer performed multiple cheers and dance numbers. Members of the football team also hyped up the crowd by performing their own cheer. The rally ended with the Cru Spirit Dance and students singing the Alma Mater. Saturday’s activities began at 8:30 a.m. at the Manning Chapel in Meyer Christian Studies Center as Shawn Shannon and a student worship band from the Baptist Student Ministry led a worship service. Later, brunch was held on the third floor of Bawcom Student Union where parents were able to meet and talk with their student’s professors about their classes. Molly Mitchell, mother of freshman graphic design major Macy Mitchell shared that her favorite part about the weekend was “… getting to spend time with Macy and meeting her...

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Breaking every yoke: raising awareness for human trafficking
Oct10

Breaking every yoke: raising awareness for human trafficking

The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor’s Baptist Student Ministry held an event on campus called “To Break Every Yoke” in order to raise awareness for human trafficking. The event was held on Oct. 5 and was put on by the Faith in Action team, led by senior Christian studies major Andie Dillow, junior Christian studies major Celina Gonzales and sophomore information technology major Lee Thomas. “This month is human trafficking awareness month,” Gonzales said. “We wanted to do this event now to raise awareness of human trafficking. God really opened doors for us to contact people through the BSM.” The event opened with a prayer and welcome led by sophomore information technology major Lee Thomas. “I wanted to raise awareness of human trafficking and improve my knowledge as well,” Thomas said in his welcome. “I think it is important that we talk about this because women are not objects, they are important.” Kathy Ylostalo, director of Ark 2 Freedom, which is a ministry of Hope for the Hungry that provides help for victims of and raises awareness of human trafficking, started her speech with a demonstration. Ylostalo asked for two volunteers to go on a hypothetical all-expenses paid trip to Florida. She brought the two volunteers up on the stage and began to pray with them. By the time the prayer was over, Ylostalo had tied the two volunteers together by their wrists. “I wanted to show you how easy it is for potential traffickers to lure you in,” Ylostalo said. “Often, they make false promises to trick their victims into being captured.” Jeniece Charlez, mother to human trafficking victim Natalie Fisher, spoke about her daughter’s experiences. “She introduced us to a boy she met at school, who we thought was a nice boy,” Charlez said. “He turned out to be her pimp. He brought her into the human trafficking world.” The world that Natalie was exposed to destroyed her life, as the connections she made there impacted her decisions. Ultimately she was unable to disconnect from the people who controlled her. She was eventually removed from her home in Mississippi because of death threats made against her and her own young daughters. Natalie was later murdered in Houston in 2015. “It is important to remember that trafficking does not discriminate,” Charlez said. “This is not a movie. This is real and they want our daughters.” Currently, there are no support groups offered for families of the victims of human trafficking in the Belton area. However, Ark 2 Freedom is working on creating support groups for the victims’ families. Summer Shine, a human trafficking victim, also spoke at the event....

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