‘Starbucks lady’ brightens students’ days
Oct29

‘Starbucks lady’ brightens students’ days

By Starr Rivers Along with attentive faculty members, UMHB is known for its student-centered staff. Those who work in buildings such as Bawcom, Mabee, and Mayborn are especially treasured by students. They are not just employees or someone who wipes down tables or takes a Chick-Fil-A order, but they are an integral part of students’ lives. And for them, the students are just as valuable. Terry Hunt, “the Starbucks lady,” has been a UMHB employee for a decade now and her devotion to the campus and its students has continued to grow. She is a passionate Crusader Football fan who attends every home game and most away games and sees her job as more than a paycheck. “I worked at Mayborn for eight years and it was like going home, not going to a job.” She said. Terry believes her purpose here is to make a connection with the students. “The kids here are my lifeline,” she said. “My kids live in California, so being here, the kids keep me from being lonely.” Her love for the students has always been evident, and last spring she learned that the feeling was very mutual. “January 2nd [of 2015], I was diagnosed with stage four breast cancer. I was given six months to a year [to live],” Hunt said. Because of the effects chemotherapy would have on her body, she was given the choice to continue working or just rest; it was up to her. She decided to keep working. She would work for two weeks, then take a week off after treatments, and then work another two weeks and so on. But the support she received was astounding. “The students and the staff rallied around me,” she said. “The Mayborn staff started a GoFundMe account and it has helped amazingly. They took up a collection and paid my deductible on my insurance.” But it did not stop there. “They began holding special prayer meetings for me. The BSM reached out and I received hundreds of cards and letters from so many people. They are now all on my wall pinned up.” Terry said continuing to work while sick was extremely hard, and that the cancer was not just getting to her physically but mentally, too. “There were days I didn’t want to get up. And at home, when I was alone, the cancer would get to me. But when I was here, the kids would keep me going.” The students became motivation for her to keep going. They would bring cards, letters, flowers, but more importantly, they prayed. Former UMHB president Dr. Jerry G. Bawcom and First Lady Vicky Bawcom...

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Red Bus Project ‘on the move for orphans’
Oct14

Red Bus Project ‘on the move for orphans’

Dozens of students crowded around a red double decker bus that was parked outside the Bawcom Student Union Building. The large vehicle is called the Red Bus Project, and its purpose is to attract students to buy items for sale and spread awareness about orhan care. The project is a mobile thrift store that travels from different college campuses, spreading awareness about the more than 140 million orphans around the world in need of hope. Their mission is to give the college students a chance to help by buying clothes at reasonable prices and donating clothes they have outgrown or no longer need. The money made is solely given to an orphan care system called Share Hope. Share Hope is the main base of the organization and is run by Steven Curtis Chapman and his wife Mary Beth Chapman. Their daughter, Emily Chapman, was attending Baylor University when she came up with the idea to get college students involved with helping orphans. Chapman and her family launched the Red Bus Project in 2012, and since then have visited over 60 different colleges. “The very first tour of the red bus actually came through my university, it was one of the first or second stops ever made. I went and hung out, figured out what it was all about, and fell in love.” Ashley West said, an intern for the Red Bus Project. Freshman nursing major Sedona Goad thinks the project is a great way to bring awareness of orphans to students. “I think it’s a really good organization and how they are doing it through thrifting,” Goad said. “It’s really “in” right now among college students and by going campus-to-campus and getting as much money as they can and donating it solely to the orphan care, I really admire that” Goad was so impressed with the organization that she decided to work with the project while they were on campus and help students involved. “I’m in FYC and at first we were required to take shifts, but then I got here and I talked to one of the people that runs the show and I was really interested and really glad that I could help. They gave me all these statistics about how every 18 seconds a person is orphaned so I want to do anything I can to help out.” Orphaned children often lose their voices and are overlooked and undervalued. The Red Bus Project wants to give those children a voice. Students who didn’t get a chance to participate in the Red Bus Project can always help.. Students can mail their old clothes to the organization, intern...

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Texas Secretary of State urges students to vote
Oct14

Texas Secretary of State urges students to vote

Texas Secretary of State Carlos H. Cascos was on campus Oct. 6 to speak with students about the importance of voting. The Secretary held an open forum with young voters where he asked them why some of them don’t vote and offered solutions to their concerns. Secretary Cascos began by sharing a story of how voter turnout has impacted his own political career. In 2010, Cascos was running for re-election as County Judge in Cameron County. “This is when it gets to where every vote is important. I get a call from the elections administrator. He said, ‘Congratulations, you won by 87 votes.’ At 1:00 in the morning, I get another call. He said, ‘We’ve found a box [of ballots]. You lost by 5 votes,” Cascos said. It turned out that the box had already been counted. The election went to a recount and Cascos ended up winning the election by 69 votes. However, that election was an eye-opening moment. “Right then and there, there was an awakening that every vote does count. Every vote is important,” he said. Cascos also urged students not to simply fall under the umbrella of a certain political party. Instead, he challenged students to only vote for candidates they are familiar with and believe in. “There’s such a thing called the straight-ticket vote. Whether you’re a democrat or republican, I disagree with it,” Cascos said. “Neither side of the aisle has a monopoly on good government. They both have good ideas and not so good ideas.” The secretary asked students who don’t vote to reveal the reason why. Sophomore political science major Sam Casey said he hasn’t voted because he doesn’t feel that politicians have done a good enough job to earn his vote. “It’s like I’m the boss and you’re the interviewee. I’m not going to go search for you and try and find you for the job, you need to apply for the job. As a voter you need to come earn my vote. So I haven’t voted because I haven’t felt compelled to vote for someone,” Casey said. Cascos discussed several reasons why people would decide not to vote – including a lack of knowledge about candidates and not having a favorable candidate to vote for – but said that in the end, avoiding the polls restricts the control that citizens have. “Let me recommend something. Go and vote anyway and vote a blank ballot. It counts as a number. State and federal officials look at those numbers. If there’s 10,000 blanks, I think that sends out a much louder signal,” Cascos said. “When you put in a blank ballot,...

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BSM celebrates 95 years of serving UMHB
Oct14

BSM celebrates 95 years of serving UMHB

Ninety-five years ago, the 19th Amendment was passed, allowing women to vote, the American Professional Football League was formed, and the first ever Baptist Student Union in Texas was established at Baylor Female College. In 1920 the University of Mary-Hardin Baylor was chosen as the “laboratory” for the first BSU in Texas because of its roots in Christian faith and service. UMHB has always focused on the idea of teaching not only the knowledge found in books, but the knowledge found in knowing God. This is apparent in the 1945 Centennial Series: According To His Purpose. “During the past one hundred years… the college, and the student body itself have been concerned with ‘including the Christian religion within, and not just alongside of the educational process,’” according to the series. The University’s mission served as the foundation for organizations such as the Mission Circle, Women’s Ministry Union, Student Christian Association, Young Woman’s Auxiliary, and the Baptist Student Union. The name Baptist Student Union, however, was changed to the Baptist Student Ministry in 1994 to better describe the purpose of the organization. Despite this name change, the goal of the BSM has remained very much the same since its beginning in 1920. “[The BSU] has its object in the winning of others to Christ and His Church; the enlistment of Christians in Bible and Mission study… the calling out of the called for special service,” 1920 Student Secretary Joseph P. Boone said in a 1940s pamphlet about the ministry. Today the BSM offers over 20 ministries that impact the students as well as the community surrounding our campus. BSM director Shawn Shannon believes that the constant growth and change of the BSM is what has made it such a driving force on campus. “This is my 36th year in campus ministry. My 16th at UMHB. UMHB is a precious place. I am convinced that we can touch the world from here,” she said. Shannon is thankful her time here on campus and the opportunities it has provided for ministry. “The campus is a strategic place and the college season of life is crucial for making significant decisions… and what an incubator the campus is for relationships. What an important time to pursue Christ with others and for the sake of others,” Shannon said. It’s this passion for ministry that has inspired many students on campus to get involved with the BSM, including senior interdisciplinary studies education major Rebekah Peyton. “There is such an amazing peace in knowing that I am joined together in my UMHB experience with other students who are trying to follow Christ, lead ministries, and also be...

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Deaf but not disabled: Author visits campus, shares inspiring story
Oct14

Deaf but not disabled: Author visits campus, shares inspiring story

Almost 40 years ago, a six-year-old little girl lost her hearing due to a serious bout of spinal meningitis. Later, this same little girl would overcome many obstacles, become Miss Deaf America, adopt a Deaf child named Zoe, and publish a book. This little girl’s name was Brandi Rarus. “When I lost my hearing about 40 years ago, I had no idea what an incredible journey I would go through,” Rarus said. Rarus spoke to UMHB students on Wed. Aug. 7, during chapel services about her incredible story. “It showed everyone on campus that being Deaf is not a handicap. It was really exciting to meet Brandi,” sophomore English major Guillermo Lopez said. Once Rarus became Deaf, she struggled, lost between the hearing and Deaf worlds. Because she could hear and speak before she was 6, she remained in hearing education, until she attended a Deaf camp. This camp proved to be a turning point in Rarus’ life. “Camp Mark VII was a rude awakening for me. It changed me,” Rarus said. “Everyone signed. The cooks, the lifeguard… everyone.” While Rarus was at camp, a minister taught the children that being Deaf is a gift from God and that they did not need to be ashamed of it. “I realized that I was okay. I didn’t have to keep trying to become someone I couldn’t become. I really think had I not gone, I probably would have gone to a hearing college, and married a hearing man,” Rarus said. From this point on Rarus embraced her Deafness. Rarus attended a Deaf college and married Tim, a Deaf man. Later down the road, Rarus desperately wanted a baby girl. However, God had another plan for Rarus. She birthed 3 hearing boys, the first hearing children in 124 years on Tim’s side of the family. The Rurus’ were looking into adoption when they received a phone call from the agency saying they had a Deaf female child. The Rarus’ knew that this girl, Zoe, was meant for them. “Zoe found her way to her home, my home,” Rarus said. “I cannot count how many people have said she’s lucky to have me, but I want to say ‘no, I’m lucky to have her.’” After adopting Zoe, Rarus dabbled in writing articles, but she could not get them published. Then Zoe’s story idea was born. Rarus interviewed Zoe’s birth family, and her first adoptive family to compile a book. Through Rarus’ book, Zoe’s birth mother and father were able to let go of their animosity towards each other and forgive. “When I started the book, BJ and Jess did not talk to...

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International students get a taste of Texas
Oct08

International students get a taste of Texas

For a few short hours on a Friday night in a small Texas town, students from all over the world were able to come together to share their cultures at a Baptist Student Ministries event called Texas Night. The event took place on Sept. 25 from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Lord Conference Center at Parker Academic Center. The night was full of dancing, food, smiles and laughter, as students from many different places and backgrounds got a taste of what true Texan culture is like. “It was mostly a dance. We teach some line dances and two-stepping. We also do some American culture games such as Jeopardy about Texas trivia,” English and Christian studies major Jake Raabe said. While the event only lasted a few hours, the memories and friendships that were made that night were ones that will truly last a lifetime. “It’s important for us to allow students to meet and blend different cultures together,” Raabe said. “The purpose of Texas Night is to assimilate internationals to Texas culture, and also to help internationals and Americans build relationships. There are students here from all over the world. We want people to meet here,” Raabe said. The event seemed to be a hit as students, traditional and international alike, joined in on the festivities. “Everyone seemed to really enjoy themselves. [The international students] really enjoyed the large line dances where, if I remember correctly, only one or two students stayed off to the side,” junior international business and business management major Dylan Hall said. Shawn Shannon, the Director of the BSM, was pleased with the impact Texas Night had on the international students. “We ended up with around 80 people total or so there. We all had a lot of fun,” Shannon said. Future events are already being planned that will allow International students and American students to gather and share their lives and cultures with one another. “In November we will be having an International Thanksgiving meal where we will have a meal for both international and American students as another way to make sure we are allowing students to meet,” Raabe...

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