Cru defense stymies Millsaps
Sep16

Cru defense stymies Millsaps

The Crusaders got off to a slow start in their first game of the 2015 season, but they managed to shake off the rust and responded with a 65-12 thumping of Millsaps College Saturday night at Crusader stadium. After forcing a Millsaps three-and-out, the Cru got the scoring off early when senior quarterback Zach Anderson connected with junior Wykeyhe Walker for a 37-yard touchdown strike. After a 46-yard field goal from Jacob O’Neill, sophomore running back Duane Thompson ran around the right side and picked up a block from wide receiver Robbie Seybold to spring an 11-yard touchdown that put the Cru up 17-0. With 9:21 remaining in the second quarter, Anderson broke free for a 41-yard scramble to the eight yard line. Backup quarterback, Blake Jackson, entered the game and hit Walker on a fade in the endzone to extend the lead to 24-0. On the next drive, Jackson connected with junior wide receiver Lin Gillham for a 12-yard touchdown to make it 32-0. Anderson left the game in the second quarter with back tightness after completing five of nine passes for 92 yards and a touchdown, while adding 53 yards on the ground. Jackson was able to pick up the slack by going 10-for-15 with 116 yards and two scores through the air and another 46 yards rushing. Jackson admitted that the passing game wasn’t as efficient as it could have been in last week’s game, but a solid week of practice helped the offense get back on the right track. “We executed really well during practice and coach harped on me all week to strengthen that aspect of the game,” he said. “I worked my hardest to do that and got it done.” Senior running back Malcolm Miller scored the final touchdown of the half when he rumbled 20 yards up the middle to make it 39-0 at the break. The Cru racked up 375 yards rushing during the night and had six ballcarriers eclipse 40 yards. “We’re very talented, and there’s so many guys with the ball in their hands who can really do a lot of things. We just want to continue to give them the ball,” Head Coach Pete Fredenberg said. Millsaps attempted and recovered an onside kick to begin the second half. The Majors then mounted a 12-play drive that was capped off by a four-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Chance Clowers to Beau Wells. A failed extra point would leave the score at 39-6. The Cru answered with a 10-play drive of their own that ended on a three-yard scoring scramble by Jackson to make it 46-6. After a pair of...

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New PAC sets the stage for the future
Sep16

New PAC sets the stage for the future

Performing arts students are eager for a building of their own. Construction could begin as early as December 2015, or as soon as the building can be fully financed. Currently, performing arts students are using Presser Hall. Built in 1929, Presser is one of the two oldest buildings on campus. With the arrival of the new PAC, students and professors will have ample room to practice and to thrill audiences with their performances. The $18.5 million project will include a new performance stage that will seat 540 people (163 seats in the balcony), a small 100-seat performance room similar to a blackbox, a rehearsal room that is the same size as the performance stage, dressing rooms for men and women that can be converted into classrooms, a state of the art design shop, a costume shop, a small recording studio for small ensembles or individuals, a box office, and office space for staff members. The new PAC will be built on the corner of University Drive where the Huckins Apartments are currently located, right at the entrance of the university. The 40,725 square-foot building is an original design by co-designers Randall Scott Associates, and Westlake, Reed, and Leskosky. The building will cover an entire avenue. “The design, while modern, fits with the campus architectural style,” Associate Vice President for Campus Planning Robert Pattee said. “The new space will certainly be beneficial to the college of the visual and performing arts because of what happens there,” Dean of Performing Arts Ted Barnes said. Right now, performing arts students are using Walton Chapel, Meyers Christian Studies Building, Manning Chapel, and Temple’s Cultural Activities Center for their performances. “We do a pretty good job with the old venues we have … but it [the PAC] will make it so much more fun for not only the performers, but also for the patrons who come and watch it,” Barnes said. One of the main reasons that the students and professors are looking forward to the new PAC is because the new building will keep the opera musical theatre troupe and various wind ensembles from having to travel somewhere for a performance. Sophomore music education major, Brianna Frederickson, expressed that not having to constantly pack up all of their equipment and move it miles away in another place will be very beneficial for the students. “We can just have everything central in one location. We don’t have to worry about anything being lost. Associate Director of Opera Music Theatre Penny Hogan said the PAC will give the opera theatre program more room to build sets, to house costumes, and to keep track of props....

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Hurricane Katrina weighs heavily on victims, locals
Sep16

Hurricane Katrina weighs heavily on victims, locals

On Aug. 29, 2005, tragedy hit the shores of Louisiana and Mississippi, leaving thousands of people homeless and destroying cities and towns in the southern states. Hurricane Katrina quickly became one of the deadliest hurricanes and costliest natural disasters in United States history. It has been 10 years since the hurricane struck, but people are still affected by it today. As many as 1,800 people were killed and 400,000 people had to evacuate their homes. For some, that became permanent. Many of the residents who were affected by the storm took refuge in Texas. Churches and families also opened up their own homes for people in need of shelter. Many places in the central Texas area, including UMHB, made an effort in helping the victims of Hurricane Katrina. One of the churches that helped out was Bethel Assembly of God in Temple. The church took about 100 evacuees from the New Orleans area. “There were so many people involved. You can imagine since there were so many affected by the storm,” Elwyn Johnston, the church’s pastor, said. Because so many were displaced by the hurricane, it was difficult to house the dozens of refugees in the church’s gym, which was being used as a makeshift shelter. But despite tight quarters, the victims stayed for several nights until they found places to stay that were more permanent or until they could reach their families who were located in Texas. Many people in the central Texas area were involved in the efforts to help the evacuees. Even UMHB students offered their free time. They made and served meals to the victims of the hurricane and welcomed them to stay in their apartments or dorm rooms for as long as they needed. Hurricane Katrina was a strong Category 5 hurricane and was the fifth hurricane that happened in 2005. It originated in the Bahamas and had a maximum wind speed of 175 mph. It was the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico until Hurricane Rita hit almost a month later. The aftermath of hurricane is still effecting the residents of Louisiana today. The destruction included many lives lost, damaged land and the loss of homes all across the Gulf Coast. The estimated cost of destruction is said to be about $108 billion. But despite the tremendous loss and damage, the state has rebuilt their population, created new buildings and has even added new attractions. The city that has always been known for its historic value and diverse culture has thrived since rebuilding efforts, and local dignitaries paid tribute to the city with many events marking the tenth anniversary of...

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Cru Jazz ensemble swings into China
Apr15

Cru Jazz ensemble swings into China

Over Spring Break, members from the jazz ensemble took a trip to China to perform in various cities.   The band embarked on its journey March 12 at 5:00 a.m. and returned to Texas the   Sunday before school resumed   after the break.   The band toured around Shanghai and Suzhou. They played at Shanghai Ocean University and several institutions in Suzhou. They performed 21 charts, featuring a vocalist and a UMHB faculty artist.   The trip was an educational experience for the students, but preparing for the trip took some effort. Planning started almost two years ago when Nils Landsberg, a professor in the music department, was teaching in China in 2013. This was when the connections were made and it all began coming together.   The students had their own preparations to make prior to the trip as they practiced for more than 125 hours before they left. In additon, the students had to practice individually for 60 to 100 hours.   Of course, there was some down time on the trip; they decided to shop locally, try traditional Chinese food and went sightseeing. The places they went included Buddhist temples, ancient gardens and local neighborhoods.   “My favorite part of the trip was the relationships that I got to build with members of the ensemble and make some relationships stronger,” senior music major Kory Jumper said. “…there are so many life altering views that will truly change the way you think about what you have.”   Dr. Steven Crawford was a featured guest on the drum set. He also gave lectures to the universities on the history of jazz in the United States.   The trip serves many purposes for the students, faculty and for the schools they where they perform.   “We are trying to give our music students the experience of touring internationally and sharing with other cultures our music, in this case jazz,” Dr. Crawford said. “It also builds relationships with other universities and opens up the possibilities of foreign students wanting to attend UMHB, so it can be looked at as a recruiting tool as well.”   This was Dr. Crawford’s second time visiting China for with the UMHB Jazz Ensemble, and he said the experience was amazing to be able to share and perform for people who shared the same interest in jazz music.   “We felt very welcomed to be there. Personally, being able to experience other cultures and then be able to share that with our students here in my classes is invaluable, especially in my World Music class.”   Crawford said he advises students who have the opportunity to...

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Phi Alpha students presents research to peers
Apr15

Phi Alpha students presents research to peers

Most historians enjoy conducting research. The part that may seem daunting is presenting that research to fellow colleagues. However, four history students got valuable experience doing just that when they participated at a Phi Alpha Theta regional conference last month on the campus of St. Edwards University.   Phi Alpha Theta is the national honor association for history students. The conference itself included students from across the state who were given the opportunity to present research from a topic of their choosing to fellow students and advisors.   Dr. Claire Phelan of the history department said the conference is not a competition, but rather a place for students to gain valuable experience presenting their work in front of their peers.   “It’s not a speech contest or something like that, it’s to encourage young scholars to get up there and take part in this type of research and presentation,” Phelan said.   Students were allowed to research and present a topic of their choosing. Senior social sciences major Jonathan Morris decided to highlight the rich farming tradition of Central Texas.   “The project explores a day-in-the-life of a Bell County farmer from the late 1800s to post World War II,” Morris said. “My project seeks to explain why Bell County has maintained its rich tradition in farming. Using oral histories from local farmers, statistical data, and studies of the physical … I begin to answer these questions.”   Morris said the conference gave him the chance to learn the strategies of presenting historical research.   “The whole experience was a teaching lesson for me. I learned that historical works are presented in a particular fashion,” he said. “It’s not like presenting a research project to a class. Presenting historical works is a lot like story telling. You emphasize the major points you want to get across by either changing the tone of your voice or being a little dramatic while presenting the major points of your presentation.”   Senior political science and history major Chris Fix presented research on the Moudawana reforms.   “The Moudawana is essentially a system of family laws that was enacted to kind of dictate what families could do and it primarily affected women,” Fix said.   While several countries have similar family laws, Fix said the Moudwana is unique because Morocco’s geographic location makes it a melting pot of two very distinct cultures.   “In my paper, I explain the history of the laws and how the laws have become more progressive through time,” he said. “It is actually quite an interesting topic because Morocco is in a unique situation of being between European...

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Cru For Life brings awareness through diaper drive
Apr15

Cru For Life brings awareness through diaper drive

Hope Pregnancy Centers serves Central Texas by offering compassion, accurate information and practical help to men and women facing unplanned pregnancies and past abortions.   “We want to help them in any way possible,” Junior Christian Studies major and Cru for Life officer Mike Perry said, referring to the group’s dedication to bolster relations with other ministries and to promote pro-life causes.   To serve an immediate need of Hope Pregnancy Centers, Cru for Life held a Diaper Drive from March 23 to 27.   “All the donations from the Diaper Drive went to Hope Pregnancy Center in Temple, TX,” Junior Psychology major Cru for Life President and Rachel Booth said.   “The center’s director was very thankful when we delivered the baby items. Pregnancy centers rely on the donations and support of others, so we are always looking for ways to serve them, especially since they provide such incredible resources for mothers, fathers, and their babies.”   Cru for Life received several diaper donations and nearly $300 in donations, which they used to buy infant supplies at Walmart.   The gifts served to meet more than a physical need Perry added.   He said the infant supplies will help break some ill-seeded beliefs about the pro-life cause.   “Hope took all of the diapers and items that we collected and is giving them to families and mothers within their first year of pregnancy that are in need of help. This is a crucial part of the pro-life movement, as the popular opinion is that pro-lifers don’t care for the women after they have the baby, but Hope and Cru for Life are looking to break that false stigma,” Perry said.   Today, the group heads to the Temple center to help plant flowers for its garden, “and we encourage all students to join us.” Booth added.   The Temple center is located at 2010 W. Avenue H.   “This semester has been awesome for Cru for Life. It’s been wonderful to connect with Hope and learn more about their ministry,” Booth said.   There’s more to come from Cru for Life this semester, though, as the work continues to spread their message.   “On April 28 at 7 p.m. in Shannon Commons, Cru for Life will be hosting a guest speaker named Arland Nichols, who is the founding president of John Paul II Foundation for Life and Family. He will be speaking to our group about birth control and Plan B,” Booth said.   As the world’s mentality is constantly bombarded with a pro-choice message, a talk on the issues is welcomed by a group seeking change.  ...

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