Sylvia White, lifelong learner, receives doctorate in 2019
Sep20

Sylvia White, lifelong learner, receives doctorate in 2019

Dr. Sylvia White is no ordinary UMHB graduate. At 76 years old, she is the oldest member of the Spring 2019 graduating class. On May 11, White, who teaches Exploring the Fine Arts class at UMHB, earned her Ed.D. in Educational Administration. She was one of 17 students who received a doctoral degree in the ceremony, which drew the largest audience for any commencement in the school’s history. White is no stranger to the world of education. In 1967, she earned a master’s degree from Baylor University. She worked as an elementary music teacher in her hometown of League City for 24 years. In 2009, she moved to Belton in order to be closer to her children. She began teaching piano lessons at the UMHB Conservatory, and soon afterward started teaching the Exploring the Fine Arts class. White describes herself as “a lifelong learner” which made the decision to go back to school a natural one. “I’ve always loved learning new things,” she said. One of her favorite parts of earning her doctorate was completing her dissertation. At UMHB, doctoral students complete an imbedded dissertation, meaning that they work on it during the entirety of their studies instead of just completing it in their final year. “All the classes in the Ed.D. program are geared to writing a piece of the dissertation in each class,” she said. “By the end of the three years, I had it completed.” When she chose a topic for her dissertation, White knew that she wanted to focus on veterans, who she says have a special place in her heart. “In teaching Exploring the Fine Arts, I had several student veterans, and they just touched my heart,” she said. “My first veteran asked if he could sit at the back of the room and keep the windows open. I thought, ‘there must be a way to help student veterans.’” Her desire to help these students was a major motivation for her to earn her doctoral degree. She knew that by having an Ed.D. in education, she would be better equipped to help these students in the future. Dr. Randy Hendricks, who is the director of UMHB’s Doctor of Education Program, is proud of White’s accomplishments. “Dr. White was an exceptional student in the UMHB doctoral program and provides an inspiring example of what a Christian educator should be,” Hendricks said. Senior social work major Nathan Gammage, who is White’s grandson, is incredibly proud of her accomplishments. “She works so hard and does a lot to give back to the community,” he said. “I am so proud of her.” White is not sure what God...

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Allie Dalle pursues military and softball dreams
Apr24

Allie Dalle pursues military and softball dreams

UMHB sophomore Allie Dalle has a clear vision of what she wants to do with her life. Dalle, who is a criminal justice major from Lake Travis, wants to fly Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters for the United States Army. Dalle has known that she wanted to join the military since she was around eight years old. In order to prepare for life in the Army, she is a part of UMHB’s Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program. This will allow her to join the Army as a Second Lieutenant after graduation. She has had a great experience with UMHB’s ROTC program. She originally planned to join a larger military program in college, such as Texas A&M’s Corps of Cadets. However, after finding out about UMHB’s ROTC program, she realized that she was supposed to be a Crusader. “I love it,” she said in reference to the school’s ROTC program. “It’s more of a personal experience rather than being thrown out into a big group of random people. I get to be closer with all the cadets in the program.” While earning her degree at UMHB, Dalle is fulfilling another lifelong passion—softball. “I’ve been playing softball since I was about four or five years old,” she said. “I’ve always loved it, and [I’ve] wanted to play college ball since I was probably 10.” Here at UMHB, Dalle has served as a utility player, playing a variety of positions on the team. She has played at first and third base, as well as centerfield. “Wherever they need a spot to be filled, I’ll play,” she said. Her impressive statistics for this season include a .405 batting average and a .957 fielding percentage. Softball Head Coach Larry Hennig is proud of everything Dalle has accomplished. “Allie has been a huge catalyst for our program this year. We have asked her to play several positions and she always performs well. She is one of our hardest workers at practice, and she has made herself into one of the top hitters in our conference.” According to Hennig, Dalle is a valuable member of the team not just for her softball skills, but also for her personal characteristics. “She is highly respected and loved by everyone that she comes in contact [with]. She has all of her priorities in the right place. We are so fortunate to have her in our program.” Balancing ROTC, softball and college classes can be difficult. Dalle begins her weekdays with early morning ROTC workouts. Afterwards, she heads to class, and when her classes are over for the day, she goes to softball practice. After practice, she makes...

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Cultures displayed at UMHB festival
Apr02

Cultures displayed at UMHB festival

The Multicultural Festival is an annual event that is put together to celebrate the diverse cultures that are on UMHB’s campus. This year’s event was held on Wednesday, March 20 on the third floor of Bawcom Student Union. Many different events took place at the event to feature and appreciate culture. Some of the events included a Tai Chi demonstration, praise dance, Mandarin poem readings, henna tattoos and traditional Japanese tea ceremonies. The first event of the night was a Tai Chi demonstration to relax. However, he changed directions when he stated that it could also be used for self- defense. The demonstration was interactive, as he got students to participate, and it was very informative. Another interesting event that took place during the night was a praise dance demonstration that was put on by junior nursing major Skaiye Finney. She did an outstanding job at incorporating worship into this event. Her dance was very interpretive and she also incorporated sign language. Before she began, she shared a quick PowerPoint about the background of praise and worship dancing. Her showcase was also very interactive, as she got the audience to sign with her as she danced. Spanish students and professors took time to read poems in Spanish with the audience. Dr. Madison, professor of UMHB’s Spanish I and II classes, was not planning on reading a poem, but she was asked to read a poem for the audience in place of a student that could not make it. She read a poem titled “Bala- da de los abuelos” by Nicolas Guillen. The poem was about an Afro-Cuban man that had to deal with two different kinds of racism while in Cuba. It was a very moving piece and was well-recited by Dr. Madison. Several cultures were on display, and the people that attended the event were able to learn about cultures with which they were unfamiliar. Many people came to partake in this showcase of cultures and left with a better understanding and appreciation of them. This is an event you do not want to miss when it comes around next...

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Jeb Zolman: pitcher returns to the mound
Apr02

Jeb Zolman: pitcher returns to the mound

Junior pitcher and pre physical therapy major Jeb Zolman has made a comeback to the mound this baseball season after recovering from an elbow injury. His baseball career at UMHB wasn’t always planned—in fact, he didn’t originally plan on attending UMHB at all. Zolman started his first semester of college at the Air Force Academy in Colorado, but he quickly learned that this wasn’t the right choice for him. After six months there, he decided to return to his hometown of Humble and attend community college for the rest of the spring semester. “I had no idea what I wanted to do or where I wanted to go. I was at a loss,” Zolman said. “I started touring colleges again. I visited Southern Methodist University and UT Dallas, but on the way home from touring, we came through Belton.” A few years before this, Zolman’s older brother had toured UMHB. Remembering this, Zolman decided to take a tour himself. After he toured the school, he knew that UMHB would be his home. “I wasn’t even home yet on the drive back and I told my mom, ‘I think I want to go there.’ UMHB just felt like home,” Zolman said. Zolman was previously out of the game for almost a year due to a torn ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), a devastating elbow injury that can take months to heal and typically requires surgery. He received this injury during the beginning of the 2018 season. He first realized that something was wrong during a game against LeTourneau University. He described how during the first inning of the game, his pitching ability began to suffer. “Through the first inning…I just knew something wasn’t feeling right,” Zolman said. After having surgery and going through rehab, Zolman made his first appearance at the mound this season during the game against Blackburn College on Wednesday, March 13. Having played baseball since he could crawl, being able to play for UMHB again was a relief. “It was pretty exciting to be back. You work for nine to 10 months just to do one little thing, and you know that in your mind, you worked your tail off to do that,” he said. Head coach Ben Shipp is excited to see Zolman back on the mound. “Jeb has been a big missing element for this team,” he said. “He had moved into the number one pitching slot for us, and his injury in 2018 was part of our downfall last year. When you lose a kid like Jeb…it was devastating.” Shipp said that when Zolman started attending UMHB, he approached the team himself about wanting to...

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Foster Love Bell County
Apr02

Foster Love Bell County

Foster Love Bell County celebrated the grand opening of their Foster Love House on Friday, Feb. 22. FLBC works to serve children who are in the foster care system in the Bell County area. Candace Cartwright founded the organization in February 2016. “I founded it [Foster Love] about three years ago,” Cartwright said. “I didn’t have a big vision or anything like this [the house] in mind, but it started out as a group on Facebook after my husband and I adopted from foster care.” The organization realized their need for a house facility when they discovered that children without a foster family assignment did not have a place to stay. FLBC moved into the house on Dec. 1,2018, and officially openedthe house on Feb. 22, 2019. The house provides several services for individuals involved in the foster program in Bell County. “We are kind of like a multi-resource center,” Cart- wright said. “We are open for conferences—we have two conference rooms that are available for case workers to use. Throughout the course of a case, there are a lot of conferences that have to take place and they have their unit meetings here.” The house also has a kitchen, laundry room, playroom, supply closet and two bedrooms for children and other individuals involved in the foster program. “One of the main reasons we opened the house was for the bathrooms,” Cartwrightsaid. “The Temple office doesnot have a shower facility and so the kids come in here needing to be cleaned.” The search for the Foster Love House began as a quest to find an office space for members of FLBC to use. “We were initially looking for an office space,”Cartwright said. “Over time, knowing what was going on in the CPS (Child ProtectiveServices) offices and that kids often come into care needing either a shower or a meal or a snack or supplies changed that. Often times they sit in an office for hours waiting for a placement with really nothing to do in an office-type setting, which is why the playrooms are there. Unfortunately, that wait does transfer overnight, and we knew that instead of sleeping on an office floor, a bedroom would be better in a home-like setting.” The Foster Love Bell County mission statement is to “raise awareness and mobilize the community to care for those in the child welfare system.” They accomplish this goal by providing a safe place for children in the foster system and engaging the community in helping the children in need. UMHB students are getting involved in helping at the Foster Love House in various ways. “We are so excited...

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Dr. Joey Tabarlet: Professor and friend
Apr02

Dr. Joey Tabarlet: Professor and friend

UMHB’s Communication and Media Studies Department chair Dr. Joey Tabarlet has been inspiring students on campus since 1995. Tabarlet is also a movie buff, cat lover, dad-joke comedian and guitarist. Besides teaching, his research explores major historical events in mass media and moral depictions in film. He has also been involved with curriculum development and assessments. Tabarlet has been president of the UMHB faculty assembly and served on the Promotion and Tenure Committee, the Honors Committee and the Nominating Committee. He also founded the Central Texas Film Society. “I thought he was a very interesting professor to have,” freshman film studies major Sarah McGirk said. “He had a lot of interesting stories and real-world information that made the class easier to understand and relate to.” McGirk said that she felt challenged by the assignments he gave, and she noted that he always made sure to give feedback for improvements. Anytime she did not understand a topic, she said that he was very helpful in explaining things. “As a freshman, I found it refreshing to have a professor who treated his students like adults and let us talk and work at our own pace. While the class did require work, it felt accomplishable. I really loved having Dr. Tabarlet and hope I get to take another one of his classes sometime in my college career,” McGirk said. Tabarlet earned both his Bachelor and Master of Arts degrees from Louisiana State University. His doctorate is from Florida State University. He taught at Wesleyan College in Georgia for three years before coming to UMHB in 1995 as the chair of the Speech and Drama Department, which would later become the Department of Communication and Media Studies. Since then, Tabarlet has taught many courses including Introduction to Mass Media, Film Studies and Public Speaking. He credits his interest in the communication field to his experiences in high school and college. “I was on the speech debate team in high school and college,” Tabarlet said. “That was a turning point because that really determined what I wanted to do.” It was there that he found his love for speech and debate. “I’ve taught public speaking a lot,” Tabarlet said. “This semester is the first semester in 10 or 15 years I haven’t taught Public Speaking, so I really miss it.” Tabarlet’s colleagues are also appreciative of his contributions to the school. “I’ve worked with him for a number of years in the Honors program,” said English professor Brent Gibson. “I enjoy working with him and he’s been very helpful in the Honors Seminar. I really appreciate him as a colleague and enjoy his...

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