UMHB becomes ONE at multi-church worship event
Sep12

UMHB becomes ONE at multi-church worship event

On Wednesday, Aug. 29, UMHB students gathered together in Walton Chapel for a time of worship and fellowship known as ONE. This event, held once a month on a Wednesday night at 8 p.m., features a worship team consisting of members of various local churches as well as a speaker. According to the UMHB chaplain’s office website, “It’s time we realize that the unity of the church is a top-tier theological matter,” Which is why the event focuses on bringing members of various churches together. This was the first ONE of the semester, and the chapel was packed with students who were excited to worship God in community with their peers. After the event, students gathered at Luther Memorial for lemonade and snacks with their friends. This ONE featured Logan Reynolds, the college pastor at First Baptist Belton, as well as a five-member worship band. Bassist John Allen Davidson, who graduated from UMHB in 2013, said, “It was a really cool experience to come back as an alumnus and see hundreds of college students worshiping together.” Many students who attended the event have been participating in ONE for years. Seth Blankenship, a junior pre-physical therapy major, has been coming to ONE since his freshman year. Blankenship said that his favorite thing about ONE is “getting to hear other speakers and bands that I don’t normally hear, just getting a different perspective.” He stated that this month’s ONE has been one of his favorites. For other students, this was their first time attending ONE. Garret Snyder, a freshman film studies major, came to ONE on Wednesday for the first time. “The music…made you feel very uplifted and excited to be there.” Snyder said he will definitely be attending ONE again in the future. ONE is a valued event on campus because it is the only on-campus worship event that is held on a regular basis. In addition, it allows students to hear from a variety of speakers that they would not normally have the chance to interact with. ONE was started in an attempt to unite the local churches in the Belton and Temple areas that students attend. The chaplain’s office website states that, “The fullness of the gospel is always seen when the people of God are able to recognize the difference between essential and non-essential theological doctrines and then risk overcoming divisive tribalism through strong expressions of unity in worship and service.” The next ONE will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 17 at 8 p.m. in Walton Chapel. Students can look forward to a great time interacting with their peers and worshiping God in community with...

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An Evening with C.S. Lewis
Sep12

An Evening with C.S. Lewis

“Mere Christianity,” “The Screwtape Letters,” and “The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.” All of these books have one thing in common and that is their author, C.S. Lewis. According to the official website of C.S. Lewis, “Clive Staples Lewis was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day.” “Mere Christianity,” “The Screwtape Letters,” and “The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.” All of these books have one thing in common and that is their author, C.S. Lewis. According to the official website of C.S. Lewis, “Clive Staples Lewis was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day.” On Sept. 6, 2018, UMHB hosted the “Highways & Byways Series: My Life’s Journey: An Evening with C.S. Lewis” with actor David Payne portraying Lewis. David Payne is a veteran British actor, and has performed this C.S. Lewis show over 500 times. Erik Vose, the director of the Performing Arts Center, has been working at UMHB for a little over a year and wanted to bring some of his work from California back with him.“We haven’t done anything like the Highways & Byways one-man performance before here at UMHB,” Vose said. “I wanted to expand out and do more theater projects here and this one is a great starter as a one-man show, kind of simple and can help us ease our way into integrating more theater into the Highways and Byways and UMHB in general.”Payne’s website said that he doesn’t believe it is an especially religious play but that  “you couldn’t do a play about Lewis and not include part of what made him tick, and that was his Christian Experience.”In his performance, Payne came onto the Performing Arts Center stage with a pot full of tea and made himself at home. There was a comfy looking chair and a side table with a tea cup and saucer resting on it. Payne sat down and immediately became Lewis. It is a plus that he looks like him, too. He talked about all the different aspects of his life starting with his early childhood in Belfast, Ireland and how his home felt warm and full, especially when his mother was there. Unfortunately, his mother passed away in 1908, and soon after he was sent off to boarding school in England. After graduating from boarding school, he was offered a full scholarship to the University of Oxford and while he was there he enlisted in the British Army. Payne/Lewis jumped ahead a few years and talked extensively about his friendship with...

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Listening to student concerns:  Student Government Association
Sep12

Listening to student concerns: Student Government Association

With the first month of the 2018-19 school year complete, students at The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor have settled back in to their weekly routines. New students are adjusting to university life by actively getting involved in organizations and events around campus. Student organizations are an important piece of the overall experience here at UMHB, and offer many different ways to get involved with the school whether it be through community service, leadership positions or spiritual life. One organization in particular, the Student Government Association (SGA), offers an opportunity for students to represent their class and ultimately, be a voice for the student body as a whole. One member in particular, senior political science, pre-law and speech communication double major Tyler Baker, is very excited about his involvement this year as the Student Body President. In addition to his extensive set of majors, Baker knew since his freshman year at UMHB that he wanted to participate and eventually help lead this student organization. “It’s an incredible opportunity to serve the students and be a part of an organization that has a true impact on campus,” Baker said. This semester, SGA welcomes seven new students to the senate. Six freshmen and one sophomore will soon be a part of this unique leadership experience. On Tuesday evening, the first meeting of the academic year commenced. The Director of Spiritual Life and sophomore sociology major, McKenzie Decker, opened the meeting with a prayer and a short message about leadership. She encouraged the students with a reading of Philippians 2:3-8, a passage that teaches how to be a humble and selfless leader, just as Christ was during his time on earth. Then Baker took the floor with an official swearing in of the seven new senators. He continued with a brief presentation of his vision for this year using three simple words; “up, in and out.” In greater detail, his goal for each member of the association is for them to grow upwards by strengthening their relationship with Christ, to grow inward by establishing unity within the SGA, and lastly, to grow outward by improving the student body. With these words in mind, various members of the executive council continued to lead the meeting with policies, guidelines and procedures for the upcoming semester. The final item on the agenda was the first official open floor, where members of the senate can voice their proposals and concerns for potential reforms and policies. Topics up for discussion included comments on visitor parking as well as the current smoking policy on campus. Senators are not the only people who can come up with ideas to be...

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Information session for veterans and dependants
Sep12

Information session for veterans and dependants

Veteran Career Advisor Sarah Phillips told veterans about eight different programs available to them. This occurred when UMHB’s chapter of Salute Veteran’s National Honor Society sponsored a Texas Veteran’s Commission information session in the Lord Conference Center located in Parker Academic Center on Tuesday, Sep. 4. These eight different programs she addressed are: The Claims Department of the Texas Veteran’s Commission helps veterans who have a discharge other than honorable to upgrade their discharge so they can get access to benefits. The Education De- partment approves all VA schools in Texas, and they approve on-the-job training programs. The Entrepreneur program helps veterans start and expand a business. The Fund for Veterans Assistance program provides grants to charitable organizations that provide direct assistance to veterans. The Healthcare Advocate program helps veterans navigate through the VA Hospital. The Mental Health program provides training to veterans, their families, and licensed mental health providers. The Woman Veterans program helps female veterans get the benefits they have earned. The employment program helps veterans fine-tune their resumes, plus look for and obtain jobs. Phillips spoke on the importance of having a master resume. “A master resume is usually a monster of a document. You don’t send it to anyone, but you keep track of everything you have ever done on this document,” she said. “You want to keep it updated as much as you can.” Phillips said that students should highlight how they can be team players on their resumes. “You can’t train someone to be a team player,” Phillips said. “If there’s some aspect [on a group project] that you took the lead on, say it ,” she said. Phillips also spoke about potential employers labeling candidates as over-qualified. “The reason that you’re told you’re over-qualified is because you’re putting things like you’re a leader on your resume, even though the position doesn’t require it,” she said. Phillips also said that having volunteer experience gives students hands-on experience with the job that they are interested in. “A lot of companies would love to have someone work for them for free. It’s also a great networking opportunity,” she said. Phillips also spoke about the VA work-study program. This program is available to veterans or their spouses that are in school and utilizing the GI bill. Students can work on average 25-hours a week for $7.25 per hour with this program. Phillips said that she has a passion for speaking to veterans about finding a job because she used to be in their shoes. “I was a veteran who didn’t know how to find a job,” Phillips said. “I walked into the workforce center thinking I...

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Taking a look back: 17 years since 9/11
Sep12

Taking a look back: 17 years since 9/11

On September 11, 2001, America was attacked by 19 men who had been trained by Al Qaeda. The men hijacked four passenger planes and at approximately 8:45 a.m. an American Airlines Boeing 767 crashed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. 18 minutes later, people watched United Airlines Flight 175 crash into the South Tower of the World Trade Center. At approximately 9:45 a.m., American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the west side of the Pentagon. United Flight 93 was also hijacked and crashed into a field in western Pennsylvania at 10:10 a.m. (BBC and CNN). During the attack at the World Trade Center, 2,763 people, including 343 firefighters and paramedics, 23 New York City police officers and 37 Port Authority police officers were killed. At the Pentagon, 189 people, including 74 people aboard American Airlines Flight 77 were killed. All 44 people aboard United Flight 93 were killed. A total of 2,996 people lost their lives during these terrorist attacks, making it the deadliest terrorist attack in American history (BBC, CNN). The South Tower of the World Trade Center collapsed from the heat and explosion caused by the plane, just 15 minutes after both Boeing planes crashed into the Twin Towers. At 10:30 a.m., the North Tower collapsed. Approximately 10,000 people were treated for injuries after the towers collapsed, and only six people who were in the towers when they collapsed survived (History.com). The jet fuel from the Boeing aircraft that crashed into the Pentagon started a fire which led to a structural collapse of that building as well. None of the members aboard American Airlines Flight 77 survived (History.com). Passengers aboard United Flight 93 discovered that the flight was being hijacked and took action. It is believed that the passengers and flight attendants were able to overwhelm the terrorists with a fire extinguisher, causing a loss of control of the aircraft. The plane plummeted at approximately 500 miles per hour and crashed in a field in western Pennsylvania. None of the members of Flight 93 survived (History.com). Americans have worked to preserve the history of the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks. Museums and memorials have been opened across the nation to remind the American people of the tragedy of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the brave people who gave their lives to protect others. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum, located in New York City is dedicated to preserving the lives lost during the Attacks. UMHB freshman social work major Natalie Gonzalez Blanco visited the museum in 2017. “The original flag that was flown by the towers was on display at the memorial,” Blanco said. “They...

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First Generation dinner: Making transitions and learning traditions
Sep12

First Generation dinner: Making transitions and learning traditions

To welcome the 370 first-generation freshmen who became Crusaders this year, The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor’s President Randy O’Rear hosted the third annual First to Go Welcome Dinner on his front lawn on campus Thursday, Aug. 30. The recently established annual dinner is held for first-generation freshmen to help them get in touch with other students, faculty and even President O’Rear himself. Students had the chance to eat Cru dogs for the first time, take pictures in a photo booth and participate in a raffle for UMHB themed prizes. UMHB defines the term ‘first-generation’ as a student where neither parents received a bachelor’s degree or higher. Katie Gregory is the head of the First to Go (F2G) program and a Student Success Specialist in the Center for Academic Excellence (CAE). She personally contacts each student before the school year starts and answers their questions. “There have always been first-generation students attending UMHB, but [this is the third year the program has been active].“As each year passes, we enhance the program to be more impactful and beneficial for students,” Gregory said. Statistics show that three out of five first-generation college students do not complete a degree in six years, and 60 percent of the first-generation students who drop out of college do so during their first year. These are two statistics UMHB is trying to change. By providing recourses and answering questions, the F2G program is helping first-generation students realize that they are not alone and have many people who want them to succeed in life beyond UMHB. “Originally, I felt we had such a large number of first-generation students and I felt that the university could do more for that group of students and encourage them. The national statistics communicate that it is hard to be successful as a first-generation student,” President Randy O’Rear said. He started hosting the dinner to show first-generation students that UMHB cares about their well-being and achievements. He wanted to show the incoming freshmen that they are not alone in this and help is all around them. “They came to Mary Hardin-Baylor because they want to obtain a college degree and we are here to help them reach that goal,” O’Rear said. Many students have some sort of idea about what college will be like or they can ask their parent about their college years. But first-generation students don’t really know what to expect because they are the first in their family to experience college. Freshman social work major Mary Herschberger says that a big challenge for her is breaking the cycle of not attending a college. And she feels the pressure to succeed...

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