Student Body President hopes to lead campus in positive direction
Oct06

Student Body President hopes to lead campus in positive direction

Junior Cell Biology major, Kayla Headley, is working toward her career in medicine and is planning to add a Spanish minor to her academic plan. While this might sound like a tough workload, she actually came to UMHB with 30 credits. One main for the addition of Spanish to her plan is because she intends to start a practice in Texas where many citizens speak Spanish. “I interned with a pediatrician over the summer who was bilingual and I felt so helpless when we had a patient who didn’t speak English,” Headley said. “It motivated me to master Spanish so I can effectively communicate with my patients.” After medical school, she wants to do a three to five-year residency program and start a practice focused on pediatric neurology. Headley jokes that if she gets married and starts a family along the way it would be a bonus, but currently that’s not her main goal. Although Headley is focused on her future goals and making the world a better place, for now she is focusing on helping to make UMHB the best it can be through her newly-appointed role as Student Body President. Headley wasn’t always as confident in her student government roles. She ironically, ran to be on her high school’s student council every year but was never elected. Her freshman year she put off joining any organizations and often club hopped. But eventually she found the Student Government Association. “Reaching out was my first event on-campus and I saw how incredible it was for everyone to come together and serve – service is my love language – and I was like, who put this on? Someone said it was SGA and I knew these were my people.” During her freshman year, she ran for sophomore class president and to her surprise, she was elected. “I was over the moon excited when I got elected as sophomore class president. It’s sometimes hard to find your place on campus and it’s nice to know that SGA is my place. This is my niche.” Headley began her reign in the spring of 2015 as Student Body President, and was able to begin her duties last semester and over the summer. This included meeting with former Student Body President, Jonathan Kendall, and working with other students to come up with an agenda for the upcoming semester. “I thought that I would be doing a lot of work on my own and have been pleasantly surprised that it’s a lot of group work and more delegating.” Headley said. “It made me get out of my comfort zone and lean on other people. We...

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Barefoot student walks through life with ‘unique perspective’
Oct06

Barefoot student walks through life with ‘unique perspective’

So who exactly is TJ Greeson? To most he is the guy who is always barefoot. Although this might seem out of the ordinary, Greeson doesn’t see why his lack of shoes is such a big deal. “I don’t wear shoes because I don’t want to wear shoes,” the junior public relations major said. “I like being barefoot.” The only time Greeson strays away from his shoeless ways is when it’s raining or if the ground has become too hot to walk on. He enjoys walking without shoes so much that he would recommend it to others who aren’t fond of oppressive footwear. He offers potential barefoot compatriots some suggestions for going without shoes. “Be careful when walking on concrete. It’s the worst,” he said. “Asphalt is better to walk on because it is softer than concrete, but grass is the best because it is soft. Walking in shaded areas also helps when it is hot.” His affinity for going without shoes comes from growing up as a missionary kid in Thailand. “I started going barefoot when I lived [overseas],” Greeson said. “I had to wear shoes at my school. So my friends and I decided to go barefoot after school as much as possible. And I’ve been doing it ever since.” Although Greeson’s bare feet were the norm when he was in Thailand, they weren’t quite as typical in the States. The public relations major said he’s asked often why he’s not wearing shoes. “I usually just tell people they’re in my bag,” But even though Greeson had trouble assimilating into American culture when he first arrived on campus three years ago, he began to get involved with campus activities and found his place. He’s been involved with Student Foundation, Crusader Knights, Easter Pageant and Welcome Week just to name a few. “Being involved on campus has helped me get more of a community here, and build relationships,” he said. “That has really helped the cultural change and homesickness.” Through these experiences, he has made life-long friends, who accept him for who he is. Senior Christian studies major Quinton Payton became one of those friends, and has come to appreciate the way Greeson views life. “He sees life in such a unique perspective and seeks adventure in everything that he does,” Payton said. “He is able to recognize the little things in life and make the most of his time with the people around him.” Payton doesn’t even mind his friend’s bare feet. “I have no problem with him walking around barefoot as long as he doesn’t put his feet up on furniture or show me the bottom...

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Cru Culture

Large t-shirts, Nike shorts and Chacos. This has been the long-going trend for college girls, especially those at UMHB. This look has illicited the taunting of college guys who claim that all girls look the same with their typical attire and similar hairstyles – long, straight hair thrown into a ponytail, messy bun or worn down. It has become a running joke for the male population around campus. But, who are these guys to judge now? Recently, the guys have been sporting their own version of the “sorority girl” look. Here are some examples of the style these mockers have been perpetuating. Footwear: This is one of the most important things to look for when identifying the “frat look.” They are strictly limited to boat shoes. The brand is open-game, but popular ones include Sperry’s and Polo. They are known for being comfortable, but they lack in hygiene department when worn without socks. Chacos might not be the cutest shoes, but at least they allow for comfort and breathability. Pants: You’ve probably seen this trend; the ever-so-popular cargo shorts with one-too-many pockets and 50 shades of khaki. Another popular go-to choice are Chubbies; the short, vibrant colored shorts that make you question whether a guy was even in his right mind when he chose to wear them. Let’s make this clear: The shorter the shorts is not better. Shirts: We can’t forget about fishing shirts and collared polo shirts to add to the outfit. You will almost never see a guy wearing a graphic t-shirt unless it is to promote their club. Solid, bright colors or plaid button-downs are also a must with this style. Add a frocket to the shirt of choice, and you are basically wearing a sign that says “frat guy wannabe.” Accessories: To complete the trend, top it off with a pair of Oakley’s or Raybans, a hat (backwards, of course) to go atop their semi-long hair and a watch of your choosing. Frattire is a real epidemic these days, and it has made its way to UMHB’s campus, despite the fact that we don’t have fraternities. Long gone are the days where the college males ganged up on females for looking the same. The tables have finally...

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Hurricane Katrina weighs heavily on victims, locals
Sep16

Hurricane Katrina weighs heavily on victims, locals

On Aug. 29, 2005, tragedy hit the shores of Louisiana and Mississippi, leaving thousands of people homeless and destroying cities and towns in the southern states. Hurricane Katrina quickly became one of the deadliest hurricanes and costliest natural disasters in United States history. It has been 10 years since the hurricane struck, but people are still affected by it today. As many as 1,800 people were killed and 400,000 people had to evacuate their homes. For some, that became permanent. Many of the residents who were affected by the storm took refuge in Texas. Churches and families also opened up their own homes for people in need of shelter. Many places in the central Texas area, including UMHB, made an effort in helping the victims of Hurricane Katrina. One of the churches that helped out was Bethel Assembly of God in Temple. The church took about 100 evacuees from the New Orleans area. “There were so many people involved. You can imagine since there were so many affected by the storm,” Elwyn Johnston, the church’s pastor, said. Because so many were displaced by the hurricane, it was difficult to house the dozens of refugees in the church’s gym, which was being used as a makeshift shelter. But despite tight quarters, the victims stayed for several nights until they found places to stay that were more permanent or until they could reach their families who were located in Texas. Many people in the central Texas area were involved in the efforts to help the evacuees. Even UMHB students offered their free time. They made and served meals to the victims of the hurricane and welcomed them to stay in their apartments or dorm rooms for as long as they needed. Hurricane Katrina was a strong Category 5 hurricane and was the fifth hurricane that happened in 2005. It originated in the Bahamas and had a maximum wind speed of 175 mph. It was the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico until Hurricane Rita hit almost a month later. The aftermath of hurricane is still effecting the residents of Louisiana today. The destruction included many lives lost, damaged land and the loss of homes all across the Gulf Coast. The estimated cost of destruction is said to be about $108 billion. But despite the tremendous loss and damage, the state has rebuilt their population, created new buildings and has even added new attractions. The city that has always been known for its historic value and diverse culture has thrived since rebuilding efforts, and local dignitaries paid tribute to the city with many events marking the tenth anniversary of...

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Cru Jazz ensemble swings into China
Apr15

Cru Jazz ensemble swings into China

Over Spring Break, members from the jazz ensemble took a trip to China to perform in various cities.   The band embarked on its journey March 12 at 5:00 a.m. and returned to Texas the   Sunday before school resumed   after the break.   The band toured around Shanghai and Suzhou. They played at Shanghai Ocean University and several institutions in Suzhou. They performed 21 charts, featuring a vocalist and a UMHB faculty artist.   The trip was an educational experience for the students, but preparing for the trip took some effort. Planning started almost two years ago when Nils Landsberg, a professor in the music department, was teaching in China in 2013. This was when the connections were made and it all began coming together.   The students had their own preparations to make prior to the trip as they practiced for more than 125 hours before they left. In additon, the students had to practice individually for 60 to 100 hours.   Of course, there was some down time on the trip; they decided to shop locally, try traditional Chinese food and went sightseeing. The places they went included Buddhist temples, ancient gardens and local neighborhoods.   “My favorite part of the trip was the relationships that I got to build with members of the ensemble and make some relationships stronger,” senior music major Kory Jumper said. “…there are so many life altering views that will truly change the way you think about what you have.”   Dr. Steven Crawford was a featured guest on the drum set. He also gave lectures to the universities on the history of jazz in the United States.   The trip serves many purposes for the students, faculty and for the schools they where they perform.   “We are trying to give our music students the experience of touring internationally and sharing with other cultures our music, in this case jazz,” Dr. Crawford said. “It also builds relationships with other universities and opens up the possibilities of foreign students wanting to attend UMHB, so it can be looked at as a recruiting tool as well.”   This was Dr. Crawford’s second time visiting China for with the UMHB Jazz Ensemble, and he said the experience was amazing to be able to share and perform for people who shared the same interest in jazz music.   “We felt very welcomed to be there. Personally, being able to experience other cultures and then be able to share that with our students here in my classes is invaluable, especially in my World Music class.”   Crawford said he advises students who have the opportunity to...

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Phi Alpha students presents research to peers
Apr15

Phi Alpha students presents research to peers

Most historians enjoy conducting research. The part that may seem daunting is presenting that research to fellow colleagues. However, four history students got valuable experience doing just that when they participated at a Phi Alpha Theta regional conference last month on the campus of St. Edwards University.   Phi Alpha Theta is the national honor association for history students. The conference itself included students from across the state who were given the opportunity to present research from a topic of their choosing to fellow students and advisors.   Dr. Claire Phelan of the history department said the conference is not a competition, but rather a place for students to gain valuable experience presenting their work in front of their peers.   “It’s not a speech contest or something like that, it’s to encourage young scholars to get up there and take part in this type of research and presentation,” Phelan said.   Students were allowed to research and present a topic of their choosing. Senior social sciences major Jonathan Morris decided to highlight the rich farming tradition of Central Texas.   “The project explores a day-in-the-life of a Bell County farmer from the late 1800s to post World War II,” Morris said. “My project seeks to explain why Bell County has maintained its rich tradition in farming. Using oral histories from local farmers, statistical data, and studies of the physical … I begin to answer these questions.”   Morris said the conference gave him the chance to learn the strategies of presenting historical research.   “The whole experience was a teaching lesson for me. I learned that historical works are presented in a particular fashion,” he said. “It’s not like presenting a research project to a class. Presenting historical works is a lot like story telling. You emphasize the major points you want to get across by either changing the tone of your voice or being a little dramatic while presenting the major points of your presentation.”   Senior political science and history major Chris Fix presented research on the Moudawana reforms.   “The Moudawana is essentially a system of family laws that was enacted to kind of dictate what families could do and it primarily affected women,” Fix said.   While several countries have similar family laws, Fix said the Moudwana is unique because Morocco’s geographic location makes it a melting pot of two very distinct cultures.   “In my paper, I explain the history of the laws and how the laws have become more progressive through time,” he said. “It is actually quite an interesting topic because Morocco is in a unique situation of being between European...

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