Intramurals give students athletic glory

Campus Recreation is a major part of college life, especially here at UMHB. Through the Campus Rec office, students and faculty have access to four outdoor basketball courts, four tennis courts, and three sand volleyball courts, which are all located at the outdoor recreation courts, behind McLane Hall. Campus Rec even provides students and faculty with the equipment they need for a variety of outdoor activities. Some of the items that can be rented are basketballs, volleyballs, tennis balls and rackets, and hammocks. Other activities, clubs and teams that fall under the Campus Rec category are Intramurals, Sader Belles, Cru Cheer and all of the Cru Fit classes. Director of Campus Recreation, Sue Weaver, has been in charge of campus recreation for the past 10 years, and she can’t imagine doing anything else. “Every semester is different. I get to plan events, work flexible hours and I get to work with the students.” Weaver said. One of Weavers favorite aspects of her job is overseeing the various intramural sports. Intramurals have become one of the biggest activities here on campus, and are open to the entire student population. Currently the Flag Football and the Sand Volleyball leagues are in season, but there is still more to come for the fall semester. Upcoming intramural opportunities include 7-on-7 CoRec Soccer and 6-on-6 Volleyball. The Campus Rec director said anyone interested in one of these fall leagues should visit the Campus Rec website at students.umhb.edu/rec/ and click on the IMLeague link. If students don’t have time to join a team this semester, there will be plenty of intramural opportunities in the spring. “In January a new Cru Fit schedule will be released and towards the end of January all of our basketball leagues will begin which are Men’s 5-on-5, which is full court, and then half court is Women’s 3-on-3 and Men’s 3-on-3” Weaver said. “Toward the end of the [spring] semester we will also start our softball league and we will be teaming up with Student Life to put on Play Day.” There is something for everyone when it comes to Campus Rec activites. Sophomore Pre Physical Therapy major, Taylor Rose, who has participated in Flag Football and 3 on 3 Women’s Basketball, said she enjoys the time spent with friends on the field and the court. “Intramurals are a great way to relieve stress. Plus it also gives me a chance to be competitive.” Senior Graphic Design Major Elizabeth Motely, who has played 3-on-3 Women’s Basketball and Sand Volleyball, said campus rec activities give her the chance to play the sports she loves. “I think I can speak for all...

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Family weekend returns to campus

By Starr Rivers It’s six weeks into the fall semester of college and although students hate to admit it, they are beginning to miss their nagging parents and annoying siblings. In order to give students a little piece of home and give parents the chance to see what their kids are up to on campus, UMHB hosted its annual Family Weekend Oct 2 and 3, with a string of events displaying UMHB traditions. The weekend began with Museum Tours at the Musick Alumni Center. Next, parents were given the chance to meet representatives from the UMHB’s President Council and Student Organizations to get a better feel of who exactly is pouring into their student’s lives and how they can get involved. Residential halls were also open to the families to see where (and how) students are living on campus. As the sun went down, students and families were treated to the musical Little Mary Sunshine presented by the UMHB Department of Music. The annual Family Weekend Pep Rally followed, where families were greeted with snare drums and cheers at Luther Memorial. The Blackshirt Cru Spirit Band, Sader Belles, and Cru Cheer Team also performed, pumping the parents up before the big game the following day. The night ended with a Family Weekend Hangout, presented by CAB, which consisted of video games, board games, and live music performed by students. Saturday morning began with a Spiritual Life and BSM Worship Service in Presser Hall, led by the families themselves. The Faculty Brunch followed, where parents were given a continental breakfast in Great Hall. The meal gave them a chance to get to know their students’ professors. Kickin’ It On King Street was one of the highlights of the weekend. There were plenty of spirit tables, lawn games, and music to get everyone in the mood for the game. Students were also eager to show their parents UMHB’s pregame tradition of welcoming the Crusader Football team and getting pumped to the sound of the Cru Spirit Band. The last event was watching Crusader Football dominate against Belhaven University. The stands were filled with students, parents, siblings, and smiling faces. Grabbing a cup of CRUnilla and a bag of popcorn, UMHB families watched the Crusaders lead the game with ease, the score reaching 50-0 by halftime. “My brother [Baylor] plays football here, my dad Kieth coaches and my mother Shelly is the Residential Director for Farris Hall,” Landry Mullins said. “So Family Weekend is always a huge deal. The atmosphere on the UMHB campus during this weekend is one of the best.” Although Family Weekend is for parents, it is also a...

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Art exhibit shows Jesus in stills

By Jasmin Ortiz Hauntingly beautiful black and white lithographs make up the Otto Dix: Matthaus Evangelium art exhibit being hosted by the UMHB Art Department of the University from Sept. 24 until Oct. 15. The exhibit tells the story of Christ through the eyes of a World War I survivor. Otto Dix was a modern artist, who lived through two world wars before dying in 1969. Dix is considered one of the greatest German Expressionist artists of the 20th Century. In the exhibit being held at the university, his war experiences are evident in his work. “The work is typical of the heightened emotional quality common to the Expressionists of that era when World Wars I and II had so violently shaken societies all over the world,” Director and Professor of the Baugh Center for the Visual Arts Art Gallery Hershall Seals, said. “Otto Dix uses military dress from WWII to illustrate the injustice done to Jesus by having soldiers arresting Christ while they all wear the uniforms of German Nazis.” Many of his pieces became more religious in nature after Dix witnessed the atrocities of the religious persecution during the Holocaust. Each piece in this particular collection is representative of a moment of Jesus’ story with a WWII twist, such as the officials being dressed in Nazi war uniforms, representing the crucifixion of the Jewish people during the war. Seals said the work is shedding a new light on the presence of God in dire times. “I think that the artist is able to capture the story of Christ in a really beautiful and inspiring manner,” freshman undeclared major Aurora Upton said. The artist focuses on particular moments such as the fisherman who was blessed by Jesus and had his bounty multiplied. This exchange is represented in a still which shows the sincere moment when the man is holding the fish in reverence. This representative of how God provides, Seals said. Dix’s take on the story of Jesus Christ through the eyes of a man who has seen the hurts and trials of war, makes the artwork even more impactful. This exhibition is part of the Bowden Collection, which provides churches, seminaries, colleges, and museums across the United States with the opportunity to display religious...

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Red Bus Project ‘on the move for orphans’
Oct14

Red Bus Project ‘on the move for orphans’

Dozens of students crowded around a red double decker bus that was parked outside the Bawcom Student Union Building. The large vehicle is called the Red Bus Project, and its purpose is to attract students to buy items for sale and spread awareness about orhan care. The project is a mobile thrift store that travels from different college campuses, spreading awareness about the more than 140 million orphans around the world in need of hope. Their mission is to give the college students a chance to help by buying clothes at reasonable prices and donating clothes they have outgrown or no longer need. The money made is solely given to an orphan care system called Share Hope. Share Hope is the main base of the organization and is run by Steven Curtis Chapman and his wife Mary Beth Chapman. Their daughter, Emily Chapman, was attending Baylor University when she came up with the idea to get college students involved with helping orphans. Chapman and her family launched the Red Bus Project in 2012, and since then have visited over 60 different colleges. “The very first tour of the red bus actually came through my university, it was one of the first or second stops ever made. I went and hung out, figured out what it was all about, and fell in love.” Ashley West said, an intern for the Red Bus Project. Freshman nursing major Sedona Goad thinks the project is a great way to bring awareness of orphans to students. “I think it’s a really good organization and how they are doing it through thrifting,” Goad said. “It’s really “in” right now among college students and by going campus-to-campus and getting as much money as they can and donating it solely to the orphan care, I really admire that” Goad was so impressed with the organization that she decided to work with the project while they were on campus and help students involved. “I’m in FYC and at first we were required to take shifts, but then I got here and I talked to one of the people that runs the show and I was really interested and really glad that I could help. They gave me all these statistics about how every 18 seconds a person is orphaned so I want to do anything I can to help out.” Orphaned children often lose their voices and are overlooked and undervalued. The Red Bus Project wants to give those children a voice. Students who didn’t get a chance to participate in the Red Bus Project can always help.. Students can mail their old clothes to the organization, intern...

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Texas Secretary of State urges students to vote
Oct14

Texas Secretary of State urges students to vote

Texas Secretary of State Carlos H. Cascos was on campus Oct. 6 to speak with students about the importance of voting. The Secretary held an open forum with young voters where he asked them why some of them don’t vote and offered solutions to their concerns. Secretary Cascos began by sharing a story of how voter turnout has impacted his own political career. In 2010, Cascos was running for re-election as County Judge in Cameron County. “This is when it gets to where every vote is important. I get a call from the elections administrator. He said, ‘Congratulations, you won by 87 votes.’ At 1:00 in the morning, I get another call. He said, ‘We’ve found a box [of ballots]. You lost by 5 votes,” Cascos said. It turned out that the box had already been counted. The election went to a recount and Cascos ended up winning the election by 69 votes. However, that election was an eye-opening moment. “Right then and there, there was an awakening that every vote does count. Every vote is important,” he said. Cascos also urged students not to simply fall under the umbrella of a certain political party. Instead, he challenged students to only vote for candidates they are familiar with and believe in. “There’s such a thing called the straight-ticket vote. Whether you’re a democrat or republican, I disagree with it,” Cascos said. “Neither side of the aisle has a monopoly on good government. They both have good ideas and not so good ideas.” The secretary asked students who don’t vote to reveal the reason why. Sophomore political science major Sam Casey said he hasn’t voted because he doesn’t feel that politicians have done a good enough job to earn his vote. “It’s like I’m the boss and you’re the interviewee. I’m not going to go search for you and try and find you for the job, you need to apply for the job. As a voter you need to come earn my vote. So I haven’t voted because I haven’t felt compelled to vote for someone,” Casey said. Cascos discussed several reasons why people would decide not to vote – including a lack of knowledge about candidates and not having a favorable candidate to vote for – but said that in the end, avoiding the polls restricts the control that citizens have. “Let me recommend something. Go and vote anyway and vote a blank ballot. It counts as a number. State and federal officials look at those numbers. If there’s 10,000 blanks, I think that sends out a much louder signal,” Cascos said. “When you put in a blank ballot,...

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BSM celebrates 95 years of serving UMHB
Oct14

BSM celebrates 95 years of serving UMHB

Ninety-five years ago, the 19th Amendment was passed, allowing women to vote, the American Professional Football League was formed, and the first ever Baptist Student Union in Texas was established at Baylor Female College. In 1920 the University of Mary-Hardin Baylor was chosen as the “laboratory” for the first BSU in Texas because of its roots in Christian faith and service. UMHB has always focused on the idea of teaching not only the knowledge found in books, but the knowledge found in knowing God. This is apparent in the 1945 Centennial Series: According To His Purpose. “During the past one hundred years… the college, and the student body itself have been concerned with ‘including the Christian religion within, and not just alongside of the educational process,’” according to the series. The University’s mission served as the foundation for organizations such as the Mission Circle, Women’s Ministry Union, Student Christian Association, Young Woman’s Auxiliary, and the Baptist Student Union. The name Baptist Student Union, however, was changed to the Baptist Student Ministry in 1994 to better describe the purpose of the organization. Despite this name change, the goal of the BSM has remained very much the same since its beginning in 1920. “[The BSU] has its object in the winning of others to Christ and His Church; the enlistment of Christians in Bible and Mission study… the calling out of the called for special service,” 1920 Student Secretary Joseph P. Boone said in a 1940s pamphlet about the ministry. Today the BSM offers over 20 ministries that impact the students as well as the community surrounding our campus. BSM director Shawn Shannon believes that the constant growth and change of the BSM is what has made it such a driving force on campus. “This is my 36th year in campus ministry. My 16th at UMHB. UMHB is a precious place. I am convinced that we can touch the world from here,” she said. Shannon is thankful her time here on campus and the opportunities it has provided for ministry. “The campus is a strategic place and the college season of life is crucial for making significant decisions… and what an incubator the campus is for relationships. What an important time to pursue Christ with others and for the sake of others,” Shannon said. It’s this passion for ministry that has inspired many students on campus to get involved with the BSM, including senior interdisciplinary studies education major Rebekah Peyton. “There is such an amazing peace in knowing that I am joined together in my UMHB experience with other students who are trying to follow Christ, lead ministries, and also be...

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