Campus crowns Miss MHB 2016
Nov19

Campus crowns Miss MHB 2016

Heels, ball gowns, and a tiara were all part of the annual Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor pageant that took place in Walton Chapel on Nov. 6 and 7. The event gave 26 girls representing 26 different campus organizations the opportunity to showcase their talents and be a voice for a cause they are passionate about. “Pageant is really focused on the girls building relationships together and with God. This year we focused a lot on how each girl is beautiful and flawless through Jesus Christ,” said senior elementary education major Rachel Correale, who directed the event. “This experience also grows the contestant as a person.” This year’s pageant featured a variety of talents, from stand-up comedy to spoken word to storytelling using henna and the reciting of favorite childhood books. “I have always had a love of the book The Giving Tree, so one day I sat down and prayed about it being my talent,” senior speech communication major and first runner-up Katie Stringer said. “Then next thing I knew I had a whole monologue about the ultimate gift we can receive – Jesus Christ.” Stringer was given the award for Miss Congeniality at the end of the show, which was a special award voted on by Stringer’s fellow contestants. Winning that award held great sentimental value to Stringer and her late mother. “When I won Miss Congeniality, I felt so honored and shocked. I cannot even express in words how much receiving that award meant to me,” Stringer said. “I told my mother when I was a little girl that I would one day be just like Sandra Bullock in my favorite movie and become Miss Congeniality. These wonderful new friends have graciously helped me achieve that dream.” After other special awards such as Best Gown and Best Talent were given out, it was time to announce the winner. Everyone stood and cheered as sophomore music major Karon Chapa was crowned Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor 2016. “A lot of people don’t know how vulnerable we are during practice and Karon was so encouraging when we needed her, and then I had the opportunity to see her true heart as I watched and listened to her platform,” freshman nursing major and Miss Freshman Class Mercedes Saldivar said. “I’m just super excited for her and can’t wait to see how she goes about using her platform.” Chapa has a heart for special needs families and hopes to use her reign as Miss MHB to bridge the gap between the UMHB community and the special needs community by educating students about everything. Chapa hopes to get students involved in special needs-based clubs on...

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Conversation is key with mental illness
Nov19

Conversation is key with mental illness

Chances are, you know somebody who struggles with anxiety or depression. While the signs aren’t always obvious, knowledge of certain symptoms and risk factors might just save a life. Recognizing that a problem exists is the first step to getting help, and the university offers professional counseling services to help students do just that. “We are a full-service counseling center that helps students free of charge for any counseling or emotional needs that they have,” Director of Counseling, Testing and Health Services Nate Williams said. Through the counseling center’s website, cths.umhb.edu, students can take a free and confidential mental health screening. The website also allows students to sign up for one-on-one counseling. Sophomore marketing major Rebekah Brown has struggled with depression for much of her life. She said there are several symptoms that may be a cause for concern. “The beginning symptoms of depression may include change in weight and a change in sleeping and eating patterns,” Brown said. “Irritability and mood swings may also occur. You may have feelings of hopelessness, unworthiness, or self-loathing. What’s really unfortunate is that most college students experience all of these things, so it may be difficult to distinguish a bad day from a developing mental illness.” While it may be difficult to discern between a normal, hectic life and an underlying problem, Williams said one sign of mental illness is when overall quality of life suffers. “Stress is a sign of life. So in some ways, we look at stress as a good thing to a point,” he said. “What it really comes down to is, you have to ask yourself, ‘How is this affecting me?’ Maybe it’s something like test anxiety and that anxiety is affecting my performance in academics.” Once someone realizes they have a problem, the next step is to get help, and the best way to do so is by talking with a professional. “There is an unnecessary stigma against medication and therapy that should not exist. Just like you go to the doctor when your body is sick, you need to do whatever possible to keep your mind healthy as well,” Brown said. One of the best resources for someone dealing with a mental illness is to have someone to go to. However, it can be a difficult conversation to start. Williams said that if someone notices a friend or loved one showing signs of depression, it’s important to take action. The key thing in helping someone is to not avoid it,” he said. “Sometimes it can be uncomfortable because we don’t know what to say, and the real truth is, sometimes we don’t need to say...

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University adds historic home
Nov19

University adds historic home

It’s big. It’s red. And it’s a new addition to the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor campus. The Curtis Mansion, also known as the Miller-Curtis House, was built in 1902 by William Ray Miller and his wife Ida. The house was built after the good cotton years left the family wealthy. In its architecture, Queen Anne features are mingled with Shingle style, which were popular in the eastern U.S. during that time. The design included fireplaces in every room. Fine materials and detailing inside and out gave elegance to the structure, according to uncoveredtexas.com. In 1914, A. Lon and Cora (Lee) Curtis acquired the property. For the next 59 years, the Curtis family occupied the mansion, thus earning the name of the “Curtis Mansion.” In 1977, The Curtis House became an official historical landmark, and received a medallion and plate on site. The recent owners, Richard and Pat Dale, former UMHB alumni, have owned the house for over 30 years. Dr. Steve Theodore, Senior Vice President for Administration & Chief Operating Officer, said UMHB has maintained a good relationship with the Dale family over the years. “It’s a beautiful home, and they’ve kept it immaculate…it’s in great shape, even for an old home” When the Dale family decided it was finally time to put the house up for sale, UMHB jumped at the chance to own the home in September of 2015. But despite the university’s eagerness to own the property, there aren’t any big plans for the house quite yet. Theodore said the University felt it was important, given the location, to purchase it. “We’re looking forward to doing something with it. We want to keep the house and keep it in its beautiful condition, and show it off. It’s a great place.” Several years ago, a cluster of rooms were renovated in the Curtis Mansion, but overall it still needs some work. “The house will need some upgrades like the air conditioning and probably a new roof. We’ve got some work to do to the house, but it’s a beautiful home.” As UMHB prepares to work in the Curtis Mansion, they know that changes will need to be made in order to make it appropriate for University usage. “As we use it for an institutional building, we’ll have to get it ADA (American Disability Act) compliant,” Theodore said. “We’ll have to have ramps, or possibly an elevator.” Students and those who grew up in the area are excited to see the building become a campus facility. “As a child, my siblings and I would always talk about living in the house and what it would be like.” said...

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Cru bounces back with win against Howard Payne
Nov07

Cru bounces back with win against Howard Payne

The UMHB football team responded to its first regular season loss in six years by beating Howard Payne University 67-14 on a chilly Saturday afternoon at Crusader Stadium. On the Cru’s opening drive, Senior quarterback Zach Anderson hit Wykeyhe Walker for a 38- yard gain before he was pushed out of bounds at the 14-yard line. On the next play, Anderson found Walker again over the middle for a 14-yard touchdown to put the Cru up 6-0 after a blocked extra point attempt. With 5:03 left in the first quarter, Anderson launched a 50-yard bomb that Walker hauled in in the endzone for his second score of the afternoon to extend the lead to 13-0. Senior kicker Jacob O’Neill hit a 33-yard field goal to push the lead to 16-0 with 1:21 remaining in the first quarter. Junior quarterback Blake Jackson entered the game for the Cru and connected with receiver Robbie Seybold for a 39-yard reception to put the Cru at the HPU three yard line. Two plays later, DeNarian Thomas took the handoff on an end-around for a 2- yard touchdown that made it 23-0 at the start of the second quarter. With 8:39 left in the half, the Yellow Jackets got on the board with a 1-yard run by Ja’Von Dickson which made it 23-7. The UMHB punt team downed a Baylor Mullins punt at the 3 yard line. HPU running back Justin Acosta fumbled on the first play of the drive and Bryce Wilkerson pounced on it in the endzone for a touchdown to give the Crusaders a 30-7 advantage. The Yellow Jackets answered by driving 74 yards on 9 plays and eventually scoring on a 1-yard touchdown from Patrick Hernand to cut the lead to 30-14 at the half. UMHB Head Coach Pete Fredenberg wasn’t pleased with his team’s play in the first half. “I don’t think we were focused. We jumped offside a number of times. They were struggling to make first downs, but we were helping them,” he said. “We did some things defensively that we didn’t in practice. We talked at halftime and they came out and really responded it in the second half.” UMHB opened the second half with a touchdown when Jackson rolled out and found Jordan Millar for a 9-yard touchdown. A 14-yard run from Malcolm Miller and a 40-yard score by Duane Thompson left extended the UMHB lead to 57-7 at the end of the third quarter. Thompson had his best game of the season as he rushed for 114 yards on 9 carries. “I wanted to respond for our leaders and our seniors, because we feel...

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Week reflects on missionaries’ stories
Oct29

Week reflects on missionaries’ stories

Missionaries who are serving all over the world converged on campus Oct. 19-23 during Missions Emphasis Week. The week included events and seminars whose purpose was to connect missionaries and students. One of these seminars was called “Latte for the Lord” and was led by Susan and Kelly Curry. In 1996, the Currys created a coffee shop called An Tobar Nua in Galway, Ireland. They were nicknamed ‘The Jesus people’ by the locals and have worked hard to create relations with the people of Galway. “They didn’t trust us for a long time… they thought we were a cult. They thought we were going to pull them away from the Catholic Church,” Kelly Curry had said, “In the beginning it was so slow and we played monopoly in the afternoon because no one was there.” Kelly told a story of how a woman had come to them with her husband who was suffering from depression. The couple had taken a three-hour bus ride to get to the coffee shop, where they were prayed over by the staff for at least an hour. After three weeks Kelly called to check up on the man and found out that after 11 years his depression broke on the bus ride home. Junior Elementary Education major Beth Ann Earley was particularly moved by the Curry’s story and said she knows mission work is in her future. “I personally feel called to missions. I have always found other cultures interesting and there are so many human rights needs around the world,” Early said. “People don’t have the things that we have and we can do something about it.” The missionaries were also invited to speak to classes throughout the week. A young missionary spoke to Sara Billingsley’s literature class, and the junior Christian studies major was inspired by what he said. “[The missionary] graduated from UMHB and he came and talked about his Journeyman term. He served in Nepal and worked on sharing the gospel to unreached people groups,” Billingsley said, “It was encouraging to meet someone who graduated from UMHB who decided to commit to mission work. It was nice to get some advice on that kind of stuff.” Baptist Student Ministry Director Shawn Shannon said MEW raises awareness about the need, opportunity, purposefulness, and joy of missions. “We pray for missionaries to be in transforming conversations that help others connect their personal vocations,” she said. “We seek opportunities for missionaries to engage in relationships with students, staff, faculty, and local churches.” Some of the events on campus were the glow run, girls/boys night out, coffee house, the world market, and the prayer...

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Semi-colon Project brings mental health awareness to campus
Oct29

Semi-colon Project brings mental health awareness to campus

Mental illness effects everyone, whether directly or indirectly. Depression, PTSD, ADD and ADHD are just a common few that are widely known around America, but those who suffer from them often go untreated. The numbers of those undergoing treatment for mental illness has dramatically increased in the last few years, even though awareness of these issues has not increased. According to the Mental Illness Research Association, in 2015, approximately one in five adults experienced mental illness. But many of these people continue suffering because of the stigma associated with these types of illnesses. The UMHB counseling center is trying to end that stigma around campus and encourages anyone who has thoughts of suicide or hurting themselves to come to their offices and talk to one of the available counselors. Director of Counseling, Testing and Health servies, Nate Williams said “The reality of what it is in the rest of the nation can happen here. The same things that touch other places will touch us. Any small thing that we can do to try and raise awareness and then offer our services to prevent things like this from happening, that would be why we do it.” After months of researching the Semi-colon Project, a worldwide brand that shares people’s stories, Willams decided that it was time for the campus to start something similar. “The Semi-colon Project is mainly about suicide awareness… and the prevention of suicide. We learned about it, and we liked the emphasis it made. It’s an easy symbol, so when you see the semi-colon, you know what it’s about.” Williams’ main goal is to let students struggling with mental illness know there are resources available on campus. “There’s a real need to reach out on campus and to show people that we are here,” William’s said. “We want to reach out to those who are struggling with mental illness or just with another type of problem.” Senior social work major Morgan Matous used to struggle with severe clinical depression. She said that it was hard for her to reach out at first because not a lot of people realize its severity. “Depression is difficult to understand if you haven’t been depressed before, mainly because many people think you are just sad. [People would say] ‘maybe if you would just socialize more’ or ‘you have nothing to be sad for, you have a good life,’” Matous said. “For me, it was a feeling of hopelessness, shame, unworthiness and rage.” She said that it was hard to get out of bed most days, and she slept anywhere from 12 to 18 hours a day. She contemplated suicide and even...

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