A Crusader Christmas

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Blog: Pleasure reading isn’t so bad
Nov20

Blog: Pleasure reading isn’t so bad

Toward the end of any semester, it is difficult to pick up a book that isn’t a textbook or reading material for a class. With finals looming and stress rising, it’s unlikely to have a few minutes to do any “pleasure reading,” as some may call it. It wasn’t until my British literature professor challenged my class to read something the book club was featuring and write a report on it for extra credit, that I even thought about reading any text outside of the classroom curriculum. I remember sitting in class thinking “There’s no way I am going to have time to read any more literature for this class!” It didn’t help that the book was titled, The Last Lecture, which quite honestly sounded like the most boring topic ever. After sitting in classes all day, the last thing I wanted to glue my eyes to was yet another lecture. To my surprise, I managed to get the book, figuring I could scan through it and pull out enough details to write a paper. I began reading the first chapter. And then the second. The next thing I knew, I was 81 pages in and couldn’t stop from turning the pages. By 3 a.m., I realized I had to finish the book before I could go to bed–and for once–I was excited to write the report. There were so many topics I wanted to discuss with someone. Randy Pausch, the author of the book, wrote “Brick walls are there for a reason. They give us a chance to show how badly we want something.” His words really inspired me because during a busy time of year, when school seems endlessly demanding, any sort of a social life is dwindling and work is overwhelming, they are all just factors, simple bricks in the wall. Pausch couldn’t have said it any better. That wall just makes us prove to ourselves how badly we really want something. I challenge everyone during these last few weeks of school to realize the brick walls that stand in your paths, but rather than seeing them as an obstacle, view them as a reminder of what you’re working so hard for. Best of luck! And lastly, pick up a good book to read. You’d be surprised by what it will do for you. Sometimes breaks are the caffeine for...

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Ask a Student: What worries you most about the economy?
Nov18

Ask a Student: What worries you most about the economy?

By Lindsay Shaffer Students speak out about the economy and voice concerns about where the U.S. is...

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Video of the Week Nov. 17 – Nov. 23

I think I enjoyed seeing the guy getting hit in the face with a water balloon way too...

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Blog: Movie extra
Nov18

Blog: Movie extra

By Laura Beth Gebhardt I absolutely love movies. One could even say that I am addicted to them, so you can imagine how excited I was to be given the opportunity to be in one, especially one that starred Claire Danes, David Strathairn, Catherine O’Hara and Julia Ormond. Yet, being an extra in a film is not for everyone. Most of the time a person will either love it or hate it. I personally loved the experience and would do it again in a heartbeat. This opportunity I had to be a part of the Temple Grandin project was not a normal one, because like most extra work, I wasn’t just seen as a blurb in the background. I was, instead, working on set for four days, and had many scenes where I was right in front of the camera. Being on a legit movie set was unlike anything else I have experienced. It was absolutely amazing to see how much detail and work went into getting a simple scene done. For example, on the first day, we were shooting a scene where all we were doing was playing outside in front of the school. It couldn’t have been more than a 40-second shot, and it took us almost four hours. This is one of the reasons some people are not so fond of extra work. A phrase that describes it well is, “hurry up and wait.” The first hour you get there everyone is in a hurry to get your make up and wardrobe done, and then rush you off to set. Yet, when you get to the set, you wait and wait some more. One day we actually waited 10 hours before we started filming our first scene. But as frustrating as this sitting around was, it ended up bonding everyone who went. Since most everyone who was involved was from UMHB, we all already knew each other, but being stuck in a log cabin together for 10 hours brought us a lot closer. In spite of the long waits and sleep deprivation, the experience was so rewarding. In the film business, it sometimes comes down to whom you know. Being a performance studies major and wanting to someday be involved with movies, networking is extremely important. I believe I got a good start by being a part of this film. The director talked with me one on one several times, and the assistant director knew me by name and always made a point to say hi to me. What a great...

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Salsa class video

Here is a video from the Thursday night salsa class. Come and check it out at 9 p.m. in the Shannon...

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