UMHB’s 10-year Transformation
Jan30

UMHB’s 10-year Transformation

If you have been on the internet or social media recently, then you have probably noticed the new trend called the “10-Year Challenge.” People are posting a photo of themselves from ten years ago next to a current photo to show how their look and personal style have evolved over time. Just like the individuals in these personal comparative photos, the UMHB campus has also seen many changes in the last 10 years. Since 2009, several new buildings have been added to campus to accommodate academics, athletics, visual and performing arts and residence life. There is also a new parking lot. The Baugh Center for the Visual Arts, named after Eula Mae and John Baugh, opened in the fall of 2012. The art department had outgrown its home in the basement of Presser Hall, creating a need for a new building solely for the visual arts. Located across the street from the Mabee Student Success Center, the Baugh Center for the Visual Arts has accommodations for all types of art, including studios for painting, drawing and ceramics, as well as computer design labs and an art gallery. The Scott and White College of Nursing at UMHB has grown substantially in the last 10 years, presenting the need for a building for all things medical.   Dedicated in 2013, the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center brought a new look to campus. Thanks to generous donations, including a leading contribution from the Paul and Jane Meyer Family Foundation, the three-story building was designed to include classrooms, offices and a simulation hospital equipped with state-of-the-art technology. One of the greatest and most recognizable additions to UMHB is Bawcom Student Union and Crusader Stadium. This two-year construction project resulted in a new main hub for student activity on campus. In Bawcom, you can find students enjoying a meal in the dining hall, studying with friends, buying supplies at the bookstore or practicing their instruments in Farris Band Hall. In addition to several offices and conference rooms, each floor has a panoramic view of Crusader Stadium. This 8,000-seat stadium was the first football field on campus, providing a permanent home field for the Cru. In 2017, a dream was turned into a reality when the first performing arts center at UMHB was opened. The Sue and Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center is outfitted with rooms used to host theater productions, ensemble performances, dance recitals and other performing arts events. The Baugh Performance Hall occupies the main portion of the building. It seats 524 audience members in front of a multipurpose performance stage equipped with an orchestra pit and accommodations for theater productions. Each year,...

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Summer break brings changes to campus

Over the summer, UMHB made some notable changes to different areas of campus, the most recognizable being the renovation of the Living Flame and the gas lines that power it. When the flame was renovated, the campus decided to relocate three plaques surrounding the flame to different areas of the school. Junior Christian studies major Ashley Boutte said that she noticed the renovations to the flame when she returned to campus. “As a junior, I had the honor of being a part of the first class to go to the newly renovated flame during welcome week. I think it looks more professional this way.” Other changes that occurred over the summer include moving the senior bell from the quad to the Musick Alumni Center and Museum, as well as the renovation of Presser Hall’s first and second floors. Tyler Baker, a senior political science and speech communication double major and UMHB Student Body President, said he was pleased with the changes. “I think it was a good idea. I was pleased that it is now all concrete around the flame and I think it represents UMHB well,” Baker said. “Moving the senior bell to the alumni museum makes more sense because that is where we will all end up. It is a way to connect seniors with the alumni community.” Dr. Steve Theodore is the Senior Vice President for Administration and Chief Operating Officer of UMHB, and he oversaw all of these projects. “We did everything with the students’ interests in mind,” he said. Dr. Theodore says that there are a few more projects in the works. One that is already in action is the expansion and rebuilding of the parking lot in front of Davidson Hall. The new parking lot should be finished by mid-September. The school also plans to complete an addition to Hardy Hall by next fall. Then, the Mabee Market on the first floor of the Mabee Student Success Center will be moved into Hardy Hall along with a new Moe’s Grill. The previous location of the Mabee Market will then be converted into an Einstein Bros. bagels, providing another dining...

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Play Day 2018
Apr25

Play Day 2018

Photos by Madeline Oden and Sarah Ifft The Stribling Hall mattress racing team rushes to the next check point during Play Day festivities on April 19. Far left back to right are: Katie Wilganowski, Valarie Krauser, Kendall Miller, Chloe Poe (on mattress), Brooke Martinka, Mikayla Presley, and Meghan...

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79th Easter Pageant
Apr11

79th Easter Pageant

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Student amputee shares personal struggles and accomplishments
Apr11

Student amputee shares personal struggles and accomplishments

Emily Parker describes her life beginning after her surgery to remove her leg. She described her childhood as always being in pain, never being able to keep up with her classmates, and constantly dealing with the term “disabled.” Parker was born with a genetic disease, neurofibromatosis, which caused her tibia to break when she was nine months old. Parker and her family tried to fight the disease for 10 years while enduring 14 surgeries in the process. Multiple techniques were used to heal her leg, like casts, braces, bone rods and halo devices. After the second halo device was placed, her leg did actually heal for about a year. It wasn’t until a roller skating accident that it broke again because the bone itself was so brittle and fragile. Emily said she didn’t even realize the bone had broken again because the pain was not excruciating. Emily and her mother both went to the hospital soon after where they were given two options: a third halo device implant or amputation. Emily said she remembers thinking the halo device might have worked but amputation was a definite answer to life without suffering. She knew she would have a life outside her disability. After the surgery, Parker had to learn how to walk again, as if learning how to walk for the first time in her life. As she began this new experience, reality set in. “It was like –‘Wow. This is my life now. And this is how it is going to be forever.’ ” Parker currently serves in an amputee mentorship program. She says serving new amputees is one of her biggest passions in life. When giving them advice, she points out the realization that each amputee’s life is not over, it is a new beginning. She mentioned the hardest part is coping with the fact that a physical limb is now gone from the person’s body. Amputees can look at it as cutting away the wrong that is harming their body. Another piece of advice would be to find a physical activity that the amputee is passionate about. For Parker, that was snow skiing. Snow skiing was the first physical activity she was able to try and overcome. If being an amputee has taught Parker anything, it is that she can do anything she sets her mind to. She will have to make some adjustments in certain activities, but other than minor issues, the sky is the limit. Parker definitely credits amputation as her new form of confidence. “Being an amputee has really given me a true sense of purpose and life to where I am able to...

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Easter Pageant showcases the Gospel to community and globe
Apr11

Easter Pageant showcases the Gospel to community and globe

It came close, but the annual UMHB Easter Pageant has never been stopped by bad weather in all of its 79 year history. This year was no exception after all the rain in the morning and the night before. Though rain storms delayed the first showing by forty-five minutes, prayers were answered as the three performances of the play about Jesus’ life were performed that afternoon under clearing skies, just like the first performance in 1940. Although the noon showing was delayed 45 minutes due to rain storms, there were still three performances that went as planned on the afternoon of March 28, just as it has since 1940. That year, Easter Pageant began providing the surrounding community of UMHB with the extraordinary opportunity to witness the retelling of Jesus’ life. Every year people come together from near and far to acknowledge and celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ as students at the university perform the story based on the ultimate sacrifice. This was the second year that live-streaming of the play was seen by people across the world. Last year’s performance generated around 31,503 viewers, who came from 22 states and six countries, including Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, Ghana, Nigeria and Germany. According to the university’s website, 1,000 streamers watched an entire performance online this year. In addition, 5,000 people attended Easter Pageant on campus. One attendee, Lois Williams of Belton, has lived in the area for eight years. “I think I’ve only missed one year since we’ve moved here,” Williams said. “I just love the story and the commitment of all the students who put it on, and I have three little grandsons who live here who come with us with our kids. I look forward to their response to the Easter story.” Another audience member, Cynthia Tryon, is the advisor for the Association of Black Students on campus and has been coming to Easter Pageant for eleven years. “I look forward to the scene where the tomb is rolled away, and Jesus comes out,” Tryon said. “I love the part where they always invite everyone to come to Jesus, to invite Him to their hearts.” The performances that were livestreamed are up on the website and are still available to be viewed. Alyssa Silva, who works for the media services at the university, helped film Easter Pageant, and said that she learned a lot from the process. “Last year, I was a part of the special make-up team and I was up close and personal with Jesus,” Silva said. “I saw firsthand what was happening behind the scenes and the emotional draining Jesus went through....

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