Go Green
Sep16

Go Green

The green craze is sweeping the nation. As the message of recycling in an effort to care for the earth makes its way south, university faculty and students alike are becoming more mindful of their use of resources. Many benefits of conserving and recycling across campus are reaching the surface. From raising support for student emissions and saving money at the same time, going green is proving worth the extra effort. But sometimes the important message of stewardship takes longer to hit home for students. Dr. Darrell Watson, dean of the College of Sciences, knows this all too well. He once spent a move-in day in the early 1990s inside a 10-foot-tall cardboard recycling dumpster with his eldest son. As students would throw their cardboard boxes inside, the Watsons would break them down by stomping on them,making room for more recycling. The dean calls it his “labor of love.” Besides dumpster-diving for a day, Watson also recalls a time in a class about conservation, when he caught students putting their recyclables in the trash. He said, “(Students) were putting their aluminum cans in the trash can in my own environmental science class. So we had a little discussion … and that stopped most of it.” Taking the initiative to be a steward of the earth’s resources is beneficial for both now and the future. Watson said, “Environmental issues and taking care of this earth is every Christian’s responsibility.” The university is also taking steps to reduce its carbon footprint. Some recent initiatives include exchanging old thermostats with set-point ones, consolidating classes into select buildings and offering additional recycling during move-in time, which generated about 1,000 pounds of cardboard. Senior Vice President for Campus Planning and Support Services Edd Martin said, “Our budget is about a million (point) six per year on electricity costs. Some of the moves we make, we believe are going to save the university around 8 percent of that.” The amount of savings to the university directly affects students because operating costs “ultimately have to pass on to the students,” Martin said. “We had 3.9 percent increase in tuition, which is the lowest increase in tuition that we’ve had in I don’t know how many years.” The most notable change, are the new thermostats set at 75 degrees, with most academic buildings able to fluctuate up or down two degrees. The university continues to aim to become a better steward of its resources. “We do want to be green conscious, not to the ultra-green perspective,” Martin said. “But we want to encourage the students, and we want to encourage our faculty and staff to conserve the...

Read More

Blog: Proud to be a Crusader

There’s something about the dimly lit publications lab in the midmorning. I sit with twice warmed over coffee and only the sound of the faithful hum of the printer and the clickity-click of the keys as I type. I just finished another interview for our upcoming Special Focus page. (I can’t tell you what it’s about – it’s a secret!) I meandered through the campus bookstore while I waited for the interview. Students often complain about the prices, about what they spend on their books, or their new UMHB shirt. But I’d like to have a different perspective. It’s a little more sentimental (I guess because I’m a girl with emotions). But it has more life. It’s easy to say, “That costs too much” or “I can’t believe tuition went up again!” and stomp our feet with angry glares directed toward the person behind the check-out counter. It takes a little more thought to get to the heart of the matter (well, at least the heart of the matter according to me). We attend the best university in the world. I love UMHB. When I find myself getting anxious over what will happen after graduation, I remember the end of high school. I remember wondering How in the world am I going to pick a college? Or pay for it? How will I adjust to living away from home? What will I do when I miss my family so much, I’d almost rather quit school? God is so faithful. He led me to UMHB even when I first said, “No way” because my mom attended and that’s where she wanted me to go. God helped me take the SAT three times just to get a high enough math score. He helped me adjust being hundreds of miles from home. I found another family in my local church, in my Thursday night study, in my friends and in the people I work with everyday. Just as the bookstore clerk said to a student (overheard while I was meandering) … We are not just buying books and paying for tuition. We are investing in our education, in our future and ultimately our lives. So think past the receipt total long enough to remember all the perfectly orchestrated things … the God-moments. The shared laughter and tears. The moment you realized every bit of college life is preparing you for what’s ahead, whether it’s the class you don’t care for, or the class you love. An “expensive” book, or a self-realization that someday you’re going to miss these amazing days. Get to the heart of the matter – and I think you...

Read More

Blog- Will Sing for Coffee

Coffee is the universal language of contentment. It’s impossible to drink it and not feel more contemplative, more poetic and more united with nature. Playing coffee houses and clubs is new for me. Last spring Break my dad approached me with the prospect of starting a U2 cover band. I was honored to be The Edge Unplugged. We call ourselves We2, and we play acoustic covers of U2 songs. We debuted at O’Brian’s Irish Pub in downtown Temple that same week. This summer, we opened up for the pseudo-famous Terry Scott Taylor in Hope Chapel in Austin. Our friend Steve put together a music night on Aug. 22 at Awake Awake, a coffee house run by Hope in the City. We2 was the second of three bands that night. We crammed nine songs into our set list, everything from “New Year’s Day” to “Vertigo.” There is nothing more disappointing to a coffee connoisseur with a dairy allergy than finding you can’t get a soy latte after seeing it on the menu. “We’re out of soy,” the cashier said. My heart sank. There I was in a coffee house, choosing my favorite creamer, and everyone else in the room must have had the same idea. In no other place than Austin could a coffee house run out of soy milk. The dim lights reflected off large-mouthed coffee mugs, and the whir of a cappuccino machine broke the silence between songs. Grace Pettis, the daughter of pseudo-folk legend Pierce Pettis, was queen of the capos. She pulled out a capo to change the key of almost every song. She had a cut capo, too. This gave her music a high melodic resonance. I have never played with a capo, and I revere those guitarists who can. Her trio played acoustic tunes from Grace’s new album, scheduled for release mid-September. They sounded lovely. I was terrified. We2 rocked the little house. I was terrified to play Vertigo that night. We only practiced it for a week before the gig. I tried playing it every day to build calluses for the chords. “Uno, dos, tres, catorce!” I yelled, and we began the onslaught of complex chords and lyrics. I put my hands on autopilot because if I thought about what I was playing, I was sure to screw it up. We ended the set with “Beautiful Day,” my favorite song. At the end, everyone clapped. As soon as I unplugged my guitar, Gina Chavez was in the front of the monitors, extending her hand and complimenting our harmonies. Gina sang smooth and jazzy, like a steamy caramel macchiato. She was in perfect pitch...

Read More

UMHB All Access: Belton Tea Party protest

By Evan Duncan The Belton Tea (Taxed Enough Already) Party did not end with Lake Belton becoming a makeshift kettle, but Bell County protestors still made an impact at Confederate Park. An estimated 500-plus people gathered on the afternoon of tax day, April 15, to express their disapproval of the current federal spending in Washington. Signs littered the park with bold letters reading “pirates hijacked my paycheck,” “throw the bums out,” and even “secede.” The program involved prayer, multiple speakers, a sign parade, the singing of the national anthem and “God Bless America” and a symbolic toss of tea bags into a large vat. “What we have at the present time is our congressmen and our senators … not paying attention to the people who put them in office,” said Judy Brady, outreach chairman for the Republican Party of Bell County. Brady and her husband were among the speakers at the event. They dressed in colonial clothing to pay homage to the Boston Tea party of 1773 when colonists tossed taxed tea into the harbor. Brady spoke as a pair of tea bags dangled from her glasses. “They are not operating by the Constitution. They are taking away our rights …,” she said. “It is not fair for the young kids who are coming up in the world ….” The family theme was evident at the event, with many children present, holding signs and flags. One boy wore a T-shirt that read “I’m six years old and $48,000 in debt.” Another young boy held a sign that replaced the “O” in “Obama” with the old Soviet Union symbol of a hammer and sickle. Many conservatives and others fear that the increased government spending will leave today’s children footing the bill. Densel Corbin, a participant who clutched an American and a Texas flag, said, “I served in World War II in the United States Navy, and I have worked hard all my life since the time I was 9 years old, and I don’t want my children to be burdened by my current government’s spending.” Some Obama supporters braved the gathering to offer their opinion. “They really need to face the fact that for eight years they never came out and said a word, and for eight years Bush did what he did to destroy this country’s economy,” said Irene Andrews, who held a sign that read, “You are the bunch that got us in this mess.” The large crowd of Tea Party supporters fired comments at the Obama supporters. “We’ve got communists behind us!” one vocal protester shouted. “Why are there so many of us and only a few...

Read More
Blog – Security Cameras
Apr16

Blog – Security Cameras

Please, put cameras in the parking lots outside of buildings, UMHB. My car has been hit, keyed, and vandalized without any proof of who may have done it, and I am not sure if my car can take any more. It is expensive to the school, yes, but students and faculty can reap the benefits of the extra cost by saving money on getting scratches fixed and popping dents in our doors. We deserve to know if something happens to our investments in UMHB parking lots, so that we can ask who did it rather than asking ourselves why it happened. In my two years here, I have seen other cars get damaged and have suffered hundreds of dollars worth of damage to my once brand-new car. I would be more than happy to account for the hail damage during tornado season last year, but as for the other dents and scratches in my car, I am left with a bunch of questions and no answers. Again, I plead with you UMHB. Give us some security and accountability for what goes on in our parking...

Read More

Video of the Week — Apr. 6 – Apr. 12

“Soulja Boi Tell ‘Em”...

Read More
Page 25 of 29« First...1020...2324252627...Last »