McLane College of Business
Sep10

McLane College of Business

Gracing the face of UMHB’s College of Business is the name of Drayton McLane Jr., one of the most successful Texas businessmen in the past few decades. On Aug. 28, university president Dr. Randy O’Rear announced that the College of Business will now be named the McLane College of Business. The decision was made public at Convocation, right before McLane addressed the audience as the keynote speaker. “It’s a great honor…. At first we didn’t think we deserved something like this, but they continued to talk to us, and we felt it was a great honor and we just feel very honored to be associated with the university,” McLane said in a press conference after Convocation. He also talked about his involvement in the community and university. “I’ve always felt a part of UMHB, and we have made contributions in the past. I’ve made talks at the business school over the last few years and felt a part of it even though I didn’t go to school here,” he said. McLane is the former owner of the Houston Astros, member of a successful family business and strong supporter of Christian universities. “I think what we need in America and in Texas more is higher Christian education. Christian universities are kind of declining in population .… I think a certain amount of the population really wants to be involved in Christian higher education.” He is not the only one who feels honored to have his name associated with the university. Interim dean of the College of Business Dr. Paul Stock is happy to have the name McLane recognized with the college. “We’re pretty excited about it. Drayton McLane and the McLane family have had a relationship with UMHB for a long time. And it kind of raises the bar for us because the way the McLane family stands for integrity and honesty and community service with Christian values, and we’re hoping it really inspires our students and faculty going forward,” Stock said. McLane was born in Cameron, Texas, and after attending college, he returned to Cameron where he began working the family’s wholesale grocery business. Being family did not provide him any shortcuts to success. O’Rear retold the story, saying McLane’s father “believed that to be an effective leader, you had to earn the respect of all of the employees. So he offered Drayton a job loading trucks on the night shift.” Over the next 20 years, McLane worked his way through the ranks of the business and eventually became the executive vice president. In 1978 he became the president and chief executive officer. The McLane Company is a food...

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Running Man No More
Sep10

Running Man No More

For the first time in years, students will not be able to hold the traditional running man game due to the Belton police forbidding the activity from continuing. The first running man event of the school year was set to take place Aug. 23 until students found that it had become illegal. Running man was the ultimate competition of speed, stealth and wit on campus. Students donned dark clothing and after congregating at the softball and baseball parking lot, sprint across campus trying to make their way to the Meyer Christian Studies Building without being spotted by drivers who patrol the roads looking for runners. As can be guessed, there have been some problems with the logistics of running man. Students often got lost or ended up in the back yards of Belton residents. On one such occasion, two years ago, I was a freshman enjoying the thrill of a game of running man, when I discovered that I, along with a large group of other runners, were lost on what may or may not have been campus property. Students fell into poison ivy and others fell into one of the creeks we crossed before we eventually made our way back onto campus. Without proper guidelines and familiarity of the area, students can wander off and maybe end up having to jump the fences of Belton residents. This is where the real problem occurs. If a local resident sees two or three people dressed in black slinking around their backyard, that person may call the police or even get out a shotgun, and who could blame them? After all, clichés like “We don’t dial 911” and “Shoot first. Ask questions later” are considered proverbs by many Texans. Because of this potential for catastrophe, running man will no longer be a part the UMHB tradition, but question to ask is why now? Could it be possible to change the criteria boundaries of the game in order to make it better? It has been an ongoing ritual for years, but the event has just now been stopped. The growth of the university is likely a reason. More students coming to campus means more students participating in running man, which theoretically leads to more lost students stumbling through someone’s back yard. Another con of running man happens to be when a runner is spotted by a truck. To signify that a player is out of the game, the caught person climbs into the back of the truck and spends the rest of the game looking for others still sneaking toward Meyer. Obviously, this leads to a large number of students squeezing into the back of...

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Cru Sibs Graduate
Apr23

Cru Sibs Graduate

When students come for their first semester at UMHB, they are dubbed Crusaders for life.  With this new title comes a sense of unification; people begin to form bonds that can truly last a lifetime.  But some students developed these connections long ago. “Cru Sibs,” as they refer to themselves, are students who have a sibling also attending the university.  Throughout the university’s history, there have been many sets of Cru Sibs, each with their own unique stories of how the siblings came to attend the same school. Many little Cru Sibs actually chose this university because their older Cru Sib introduced them to the campus. “It was a trip to visit Ashleigh that made me decide to come here.  She showed me everything she loved, and I loved it too,” sophomore international business major Hallie Holden said. Holden’s older Cru Sib is senior nursing major Ashleigh Holden.  Hallie spent a weekend with her sister exploring the campus and learning about college life and chose to apply the next week.  The two have lived together for the last two semesters. Ashleigh said after graduation, she will miss rooming with her sister more than anything.  Though the two lived together the first 18 years of Ashleigh’s life, she explained that the dynamic was so different at college than at home. “We didn’t have our parents telling us what to do, but rather had to rely on each other for answers to our questions and concerns,” Ashleigh said. Next year, Ashleigh plans on moving to Waco to be a labor and delivery nurse at Hillcrest Baptist Medical Center.  While nervous about the change, she is glad to be less than an hour away from her sister. Hallie admitted she will be sad to see Ashleigh go, but is thankful for the time she was able to spend with her sister.  Much of Hallie’s involvement at the university has been influenced by Ashleigh’s experiences. Freshman nursing major Cally Baucom also referred to her sister, senior social work major Mary Baucom, for advice on organizations to join, committees to participate in and other campus activities. As a first-year student, Cally loved having a built-in source for advice and said she will miss this most of all when Mary graduates in May.  Cally may have learned about college life from watching Mary, but being a Cru Sib taught Mary as well. “I learned how to be more intentional as an older sibling, and how to really love her well,” Mary said. Both Ashleigh and Mary said that their favorite memory as Cru Sibs was the men’s national basketball game that took place April 7....

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BOBN Broadcast 1
Oct02

BOBN Broadcast 1

Watch the first broadcast by BOBN, the Bells Online Broadcasting Network!  https://vimeo.com/50634864 Antonio Hebert-Anchor, writer, editor Elissa Thompson-Anchor, writer, editor Zach Winfield-Editing Tyler Agnew-Editing Jake Stamps-Editing

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Student finds help in service dog
Sep13

Student finds help in service dog

A typical classroom has teachers, students and … dogs?  If you have anatomy or speech with Kimberly Pearson, a physical therapy major, you’ll notice her faithful dog Jack lying beside her. But you’ll also discover Jack is no ordinary dog, and Kimberly is no ordinary student.  Pearson is a mother of four children, as well as a staff sergeant in the military. Her husband is a drill sergeant in the Army. Pearson has grown up in a military environment most of her life. Her parents were in the Air Force, and when Pearson herself became a young mom, she decided to join the military to provide benefits for her children. Pearson received basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., where it was, “cold basically,” Pearson said. “We had on black rubber boots, and all of us fell down the icy hill training. It was pretty tough. But we had the chance to be hands on with the weapons and get fit.” Her second step was  Advanced Individual Training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, where she earned a combat medic’s badge. After the long and tough training, Pearson was sent to Iraq in mid-2004. She was assigned to treat wounded soldiers and attached to different units wherever she was needed. However, an event that some speculated was an explosion would soon change Pearson’s life “I remember flashbacks of various things, but I don’t know exactly what happened,” she said. The incident had caused the bones in Pearson’s feet to become severely damaged and broken. But since there was no medical clinic, x-ray machines, or open wounds, she was given orthotics and pain medicine and kept on going. She was soon sent home in March 2005.   “I went back to Iraq in 2007,”  Pearson said. “I wasn’t scared but I changed my job. I felt too close and personal to the situation. I didn’t like the feeling of having someone’s life in my hands. My new job required me to work in an office, human resources, which was less dangerous. It was a totally different experience and took some time getting used to though. I was so used to being out in the field with my medical bags and having people tell me to ‘Get down!’” After her second combat tour, Pearson need 3 constructive ankle and foot surgeries because she was still in extreme pain and discovered that her bones had not healed properly. The cane she used to walk also put pressure on her knees and further amplified her pain. “After my third surgery, I knew I wanted a dog,” says Pearson. “Not necessarily a service dog, just a...

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Students spend summer serving
Sep01

Students spend summer serving

Junior nursing major Angela Parker put not only her faith into practice this summer, but also her medical skills as she served on a rural healthcare team on the island of Mindanao, Philippines. The first few days were spent adjusting to the environment. She said, “Culturally, there were a couple of silly things that were weird, like lip pointing. Filipinos point with their lips. I’ve been out of the country before, but never to a place like the Philippines.” Parker was on the island for two months and got plenty of practical nursing experience in between Bible studies and house-to-house evangelism. “I learned so much about medicine in a Third World country and was given hands- on experience with doing immunizations … and prenatal care, wound care and some herbal remedies. I can suture now, and that’s pretty cool,” she said. Parker enjoyed putting the medical knowledge she has gained at UMHB into action. “I learned a lot about patient care too, working with people that you really can’t communicate with very well.” The opportunities had allowed Parker to witness varying medical practices on two opposite sides of the world. “I got to see the difference between healthcare in a hospital here and in the mountains and in the jungle. I really think I can apply that to my semester,” she said. Parker believes that college is a prime time to go on  mission trips, but recognizes the importance of a genuine heart in those trips. “After you graduate, you don’t have a two-month break. I think short term missions in your life can affirm if long-term missions are in your future,” she said. Parker encourages students to be intentional with their mission trips, and not to go for the sake of going. However, if students feel called, they should go. Junior math major Brittney King said, “If it’s the Lord’s goal for everyone to hear the Gospel, that should be our goal as well.” King served as an intern for iGo Global, mobilizing and training students to do mission work overseas. It was an opportunity she was eager to experience. “I wanted to see how the work that I can do here can send students to go all over the world,” King said. Having been on mission trips before, she knew what it was like to be sent, but had never considered what happens stateside while students are living overseas. King said, “I took for granted the sending side of the process. When I had gone before, I never stopped to think about all the work that has to go into sending students. It seems like an easy...

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