UMHB’s first Psalm 139 event empowers women through Christ
Feb27

UMHB’s first Psalm 139 event empowers women through Christ

Over 150 women gathered for UMHB’s first Psalm 139 event on Saturday, Jan. 19 in Bawcom Student Union. They enjoyed fellowship and worship together at the conference, which was founded and organized by senior public relations major Sydney Stolz. “The Lord planted this seed in my heart for women’s ministry years ago, but I never would have dreamed it would grow into the Psalm 139 event,” Stolz said. The conference highlighted the message of the psalm, which reads: 13 For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. 14 I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. Psalm 139:13-14 (ESV) Marissa Halvorsen, a sophomore psychology major who attended the event, said that “as women, we think we have to fit the mold of doing everything for everyone and pleasing everybody.” However, Halvorsen said that women already have their identity. “We have to make sure our identity is not found in our peers, parents, significant others, school work, etc.,” she said. “Our identity is in the Lord—He takes the pressure off of needing to please others, we only need to work to please Him.” According to sophomore business major and Psalm 139 committee member Eunice Michaelson, keynote speaker Merritt Johnston’s presentation emphasized the importance of coming to that realization. “She made us laugh, cry, and most importantly realize the truth about our identity in Christ,” Michaelson said. “Merritt Johnston is truly an incredible woman of God.” Johnston is a UMHB graduate who founded SAGE Ministries for girls while she was in college. Now president of the endeavor, she leads a team of volunteer chaplains at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center in Brenham. As she addressed students at the conference, Johnston encouraged them to find their “3:15” moment of realizing freedom, a reference to her time spent on the mission field in Germany where she visited Buchenwald, a former Nazi concentration camp. While there, Johnston was able to see what it was like to be a prisoner inside the walls of the camp and to be able to see the city around the camp – and freedom – right on the other side. She said that when prisoners were declared to be free at 3:15 p.m. on April 11, 1945, the clock stopped permanently, forever a reminder of freedom at that moment. Johnston related the story to everyone’s own personal prisons. “What is your 3:15 moment?” she asked. “What walls are separating you from your total freedom in Christ? When will you declare your freedom?” Sophomore nursing student and member of the Psalm 139 steering committee Amy Luong was deeply encouraged by Johnston’s words of encouragement. “For me, I’ve always been so focused on the future that I don’t realize that once I have Jesus Christ, my life is on track,” Luong...

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UMHB’s 10-year Transformation
Jan30

UMHB’s 10-year Transformation

If you have been on the internet or social media recently, then you have probably noticed the new trend called the “10-Year Challenge.” People are posting a photo of themselves from ten years ago next to a current photo to show how their look and personal style have evolved over time. Just like the individuals in these personal comparative photos, the UMHB campus has also seen many changes in the last 10 years. Since 2009, several new buildings have been added to campus to accommodate academics, athletics, visual and performing arts and residence life. There is also a new parking lot. The Baugh Center for the Visual Arts, named after Eula Mae and John Baugh, opened in the fall of 2012. The art department had outgrown its home in the basement of Presser Hall, creating a need for a new building solely for the visual arts. Located across the street from the Mabee Student Success Center, the Baugh Center for the Visual Arts has accommodations for all types of art, including studios for painting, drawing and ceramics, as well as computer design labs and an art gallery. The Scott and White College of Nursing at UMHB has grown substantially in the last 10 years, presenting the need for a building for all things medical.   Dedicated in 2013, the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center brought a new look to campus. Thanks to generous donations, including a leading contribution from the Paul and Jane Meyer Family Foundation, the three-story building was designed to include classrooms, offices and a simulation hospital equipped with state-of-the-art technology. One of the greatest and most recognizable additions to UMHB is Bawcom Student Union and Crusader Stadium. This two-year construction project resulted in a new main hub for student activity on campus. In Bawcom, you can find students enjoying a meal in the dining hall, studying with friends, buying supplies at the bookstore or practicing their instruments in Farris Band Hall. In addition to several offices and conference rooms, each floor has a panoramic view of Crusader Stadium. This 8,000-seat stadium was the first football field on campus, providing a permanent home field for the Cru. In 2017, a dream was turned into a reality when the first performing arts center at UMHB was opened. The Sue and Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center is outfitted with rooms used to host theater productions, ensemble performances, dance recitals and other performing arts events. The Baugh Performance Hall occupies the main portion of the building. It seats 524 audience members in front of a multipurpose performance stage equipped with an orchestra pit and accommodations for theater productions. Each year,...

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Summer break brings changes to campus

Over the summer, UMHB made some notable changes to different areas of campus, the most recognizable being the renovation of the Living Flame and the gas lines that power it. When the flame was renovated, the campus decided to relocate three plaques surrounding the flame to different areas of the school. Junior Christian studies major Ashley Boutte said that she noticed the renovations to the flame when she returned to campus. “As a junior, I had the honor of being a part of the first class to go to the newly renovated flame during welcome week. I think it looks more professional this way.” Other changes that occurred over the summer include moving the senior bell from the quad to the Musick Alumni Center and Museum, as well as the renovation of Presser Hall’s first and second floors. Tyler Baker, a senior political science and speech communication double major and UMHB Student Body President, said he was pleased with the changes. “I think it was a good idea. I was pleased that it is now all concrete around the flame and I think it represents UMHB well,” Baker said. “Moving the senior bell to the alumni museum makes more sense because that is where we will all end up. It is a way to connect seniors with the alumni community.” Dr. Steve Theodore is the Senior Vice President for Administration and Chief Operating Officer of UMHB, and he oversaw all of these projects. “We did everything with the students’ interests in mind,” he said. Dr. Theodore says that there are a few more projects in the works. One that is already in action is the expansion and rebuilding of the parking lot in front of Davidson Hall. The new parking lot should be finished by mid-September. The school also plans to complete an addition to Hardy Hall by next fall. Then, the Mabee Market on the first floor of the Mabee Student Success Center will be moved into Hardy Hall along with a new Moe’s Grill. The previous location of the Mabee Market will then be converted into an Einstein Bros. bagels, providing another dining...

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Play Day 2018
Apr25

Play Day 2018

Photos by Madeline Oden and Sarah Ifft The Stribling Hall mattress racing team rushes to the next check point during Play Day festivities on April 19. Far left back to right are: Katie Wilganowski, Valarie Krauser, Kendall Miller, Chloe Poe (on mattress), Brooke Martinka, Mikayla Presley, and Meghan...

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79th Easter Pageant
Apr11

79th Easter Pageant

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Coach ‘Fred’ inducted into Texas Sports Hall of Fame
Apr11

Coach ‘Fred’ inducted into Texas Sports Hall of Fame

Football Head Coach Pete ‘Fred’ Fredenburg was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Saturday, April 7 in Waco, Texas. The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor head coach was inducted along with eight other well-known Texas athletes and coaches in the class of 2018. Coach Fredenburg was inducted along with former Texas A&M running back Johnny Bailey (deceased), former University of Texas basketball and volleyball player Nell Fortner, Texas A&M quarterback and Super Bowl winning Head Coach Gary Kubiak, Duncanville girls basketball coach Cathy Self-Morgan, former Texas Tech basketball coach and athletic director Gerald Myers, Olympic medalist and former University of Texas swimmer Jill Sterkel, Texas Ranger Michael Young, and University of Texas National Champion quarterback Vince Young. Coach Fredenburg started UMHB’s football program from the ground up 20 years ago in 1998. Since this time, Fredenburg has led the Cru to an overall record of 210-39, 15 American Southwest Conference titles and the 2016 NCAA Division III National Championship. Under Fredenburg’s leadership the Cru has played in the Alonzo Stagg Bowl for the national championship three times. He is a winner of the Liberty Mutual Division III Coach of the Year (2014) award and the American Football Coaches Association Division III National Coach of the Year (2016) award. In the press conference, Fredenburg stated that when he came to UMHB, the football program didn’t have any equipment, coaches, or even a field. “I made a plan to try to get within a 75-mile radius of Belton to tell our story,” Coach Fred said. “We felt like that 100 guys would be a break even for the program. We had 217 guys show up that first year.” Jerrell Freeman, former Chicago Bear linebacker and UMHB alumnus played underneath Coach Fredenburg’s leadership from 2004-08. Freeman attended of the induction ceremony for the famers. “It’s been a long time coming,” Freeman said. “He’s an old school coach, so you know exactly what you’re getting from him. He’s built a really great program. He’s tough, but he knows what it takes to win.” Fredenburg also has ties with two of the other inductees, Nell Fortner and Gerald Myers. Fredenburg’s wife, Karen, used to coach Fortner and would sometimes have her husband come to basketball practice to guard Fortner. Also, Fredenburg briefly attended Monterrey High School in Lubbock, where Myers coached. Myers approached Fredenburg about playing basketball for the team. “He was a good athlete, and I was looking forward to coaching. But then his family moved. If he had stayed in Monterrey, he might have gotten a basketball scholarship [for college],” Myers said. During Fredenburg’s acceptance speech, he discussed living in the...

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