BOBN Broadcast 1
Oct02

BOBN Broadcast 1

Watch the first broadcast by BOBN, the Bells Online Broadcasting Network!  https://vimeo.com/50634864 Antonio Hebert-Anchor, writer, editor Elissa Thompson-Anchor, writer, editor Zach Winfield-Editing Tyler Agnew-Editing Jake Stamps-Editing

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Student finds help in service dog
Sep13

Student finds help in service dog

A typical classroom has teachers, students and … dogs?  If you have anatomy or speech with Kimberly Pearson, a physical therapy major, you’ll notice her faithful dog Jack lying beside her. But you’ll also discover Jack is no ordinary dog, and Kimberly is no ordinary student.  Pearson is a mother of four children, as well as a staff sergeant in the military. Her husband is a drill sergeant in the Army. Pearson has grown up in a military environment most of her life. Her parents were in the Air Force, and when Pearson herself became a young mom, she decided to join the military to provide benefits for her children. Pearson received basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., where it was, “cold basically,” Pearson said. “We had on black rubber boots, and all of us fell down the icy hill training. It was pretty tough. But we had the chance to be hands on with the weapons and get fit.” Her second step was  Advanced Individual Training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, where she earned a combat medic’s badge. After the long and tough training, Pearson was sent to Iraq in mid-2004. She was assigned to treat wounded soldiers and attached to different units wherever she was needed. However, an event that some speculated was an explosion would soon change Pearson’s life “I remember flashbacks of various things, but I don’t know exactly what happened,” she said. The incident had caused the bones in Pearson’s feet to become severely damaged and broken. But since there was no medical clinic, x-ray machines, or open wounds, she was given orthotics and pain medicine and kept on going. She was soon sent home in March 2005.   “I went back to Iraq in 2007,”  Pearson said. “I wasn’t scared but I changed my job. I felt too close and personal to the situation. I didn’t like the feeling of having someone’s life in my hands. My new job required me to work in an office, human resources, which was less dangerous. It was a totally different experience and took some time getting used to though. I was so used to being out in the field with my medical bags and having people tell me to ‘Get down!’” After her second combat tour, Pearson need 3 constructive ankle and foot surgeries because she was still in extreme pain and discovered that her bones had not healed properly. The cane she used to walk also put pressure on her knees and further amplified her pain. “After my third surgery, I knew I wanted a dog,” says Pearson. “Not necessarily a service dog, just a...

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Students spend summer serving
Sep01

Students spend summer serving

Junior nursing major Angela Parker put not only her faith into practice this summer, but also her medical skills as she served on a rural healthcare team on the island of Mindanao, Philippines. The first few days were spent adjusting to the environment. She said, “Culturally, there were a couple of silly things that were weird, like lip pointing. Filipinos point with their lips. I’ve been out of the country before, but never to a place like the Philippines.” Parker was on the island for two months and got plenty of practical nursing experience in between Bible studies and house-to-house evangelism. “I learned so much about medicine in a Third World country and was given hands- on experience with doing immunizations … and prenatal care, wound care and some herbal remedies. I can suture now, and that’s pretty cool,” she said. Parker enjoyed putting the medical knowledge she has gained at UMHB into action. “I learned a lot about patient care too, working with people that you really can’t communicate with very well.” The opportunities had allowed Parker to witness varying medical practices on two opposite sides of the world. “I got to see the difference between healthcare in a hospital here and in the mountains and in the jungle. I really think I can apply that to my semester,” she said. Parker believes that college is a prime time to go on  mission trips, but recognizes the importance of a genuine heart in those trips. “After you graduate, you don’t have a two-month break. I think short term missions in your life can affirm if long-term missions are in your future,” she said. Parker encourages students to be intentional with their mission trips, and not to go for the sake of going. However, if students feel called, they should go. Junior math major Brittney King said, “If it’s the Lord’s goal for everyone to hear the Gospel, that should be our goal as well.” King served as an intern for iGo Global, mobilizing and training students to do mission work overseas. It was an opportunity she was eager to experience. “I wanted to see how the work that I can do here can send students to go all over the world,” King said. Having been on mission trips before, she knew what it was like to be sent, but had never considered what happens stateside while students are living overseas. King said, “I took for granted the sending side of the process. When I had gone before, I never stopped to think about all the work that has to go into sending students. It seems like an easy...

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Human rights violations haunt Tindouf
Apr12

Human rights violations haunt Tindouf

Nestled in the west of the Sahara are refugee camps where people are held and not permitted to leave. Here, a word against the leaders could land someone in prison. These are the conditions in Tindouf, on the borders of Algeria and Morocco and controlled by the independence- seeking Polisario. The society is 80 percent women who participate in government. The country has a high literacy rate and sends pupils overseas to continue education. Yet they endorse slavery, torture people who speak against the government and imprison unwed mothers. When the Center for Religious Liberty held its lecture, “Dangers in the Desert,” students were provided with an in-depth look at a site said to house some of the worst human rights violations occurring today. The session wasn’t a history lesson for eager students, but a call for awareness and tangible help. “Americans can develop the region and help the U.S. government take a position in support of Morocco,” speaker and civil rights attorney Leah Farish said. “Many Texans speak Spanish, so they would have an advantage over the language barrier.” The camps were opened in 1976 when Morocco and Mauritania clashed for control of the western Sahara and its populations. But the Sahwari people who live in the desert resisted both nations. Their front group, the Polisario, has held the land since then, blocking some of the Sahwari from leaving or seeing loved ones in Morocco. The vast desert has become a massive, sandy Berlin Wall. Nancy Huff, former teacher and founder/ president of the nonprofit organization Teach the Children International joined forces with the Polisario to help them fight for independence and assist the poor Sahwari. But she realized that the Polisario were not interested in dialogue with Morocco, the strongest nation in the region. As she learned that the Polisario was teaching children to hate the Moroccan king, she knew it was time to change sides. “That was an a-ha moment for her,” Farish said. The lecture discussed the history of the struggle and the Morocco and U.S. stance that the region should become autonomous with Morocco. Hamdi Cherifi, president of Al Intimae NGO for the development of human rights and coexistence in Laayoune , also spoke of Tindouf. In an interview, he told a story of an ex-polasario Sahwari man who traveled from Morocco to Tindouf to see his family. The man had made comments supporting an autonomous government with Morocco, and his words caused with three months of captivity instead of the embraces of his family.  The man has been prohibited from ever seeing his family. “The international community and (our NGO) need to apply...

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New master’s programs create more opportunities for careers
Apr12

New master’s programs create more opportunities for careers

With the economy still in a recession, more and more students are looking to continue their education instead of jumping into the workplace right after graduation. To keep up with this trend, UMHB has added two new master’s programs: Master of Science, Family Nurse Practitioner and Master of Education in Administration of Intervention Programs. This is the College of Nursing’s third master’s program and the College of Education’s sixth. Both are expecting a receptive response from current students as well as people looking to receive their master’s from the university. Professor and Master of Science in Nursing Program Director Dr. Margaret Prydun, credits the location of the campus with the need for the new program. “We are in a unique position because we are the only provider of higher education in our area,” she said. “There are other nursing programs that have bachelor’s or associate degrees, but to go to a graduate school, you would have to travel north or south on I-35.” The College of Nursing decided to add the new program after receiving numerous calls from nurses in the community who were looking to advance their education and more specifically as a family nurse practitioner. As a licensed FNP, they will perform many of the same duties as a physician and will be able to serve a much higher population. “They can work in the physician’s office and work independently in clinics,” she said. “They can counsel, teach patient education, be a patient advocate, receive prescriptive authority and be involved in research. There is a great amount of care a FNP can give.” The two-year program will be a hybrid of 2/3 online work and 1/3 in a classroom.  Currently 14 students fill the 20 spots, and enrollment is still open until June. Dean of the College of Nursing Dr. Sharon Souter is excited about the possibilities the program has to offer students. “It gives them the opportunity for advances in employment,” she said. “We believe that the more education one gets, the better prepared they are. We believe in lifelong learning.” The Master of Education in Administration of Intervention Programs is aimed at preparing teachers to address the changing needs in school districts and provide professional assistance to at-risk students ages pre-kindergarten through 12th grade. Professor and director of the new program Dr. Karen Estes said, “In order to effectively work with students, who need additional support, whether as an interventionist or an administrator of intervention programs, individuals with specific training are more likely to be successful in assisting these students.” The program is designed to accommodate the hectic schedule of a graduate student by meeting...

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Synthetic drugs cause new policies
Mar29

Synthetic drugs cause new policies

Synthetic marijuana has become a major threat to public health, having hospitalized and even sent individuals to their deathbeds. As a result, UMHB administrators have taken steps to protect students from the dangers of “fake pot.” Synthetic cannabis is designed to mimic the high attained from marijuana. When school officials recognized synthetic marijuana was a threat to students, they confronted the issue with a new policy. Vice President of Student Life Dr. Byron Weathersbee discussed the university’s intentions of goodwill toward   students. “Sometimes we come across as having a lot of rules and cracking down—no—we’re just trying to navigate a good, healthy, clean environment where people can thrive and be at their best,” he said. Weathersbee further explained his desire to preserve the quality of life on campus. “UMHB is a unique place …. It’s a great place to come and engage the mind, engage the spirit, engage in life and have fun doing it,” he said. “Our hope is that people will live … good, healthy, moral lives.” Many recognize synthetic marijuana by the brand names Blaze, K2 or Spice. It’s often marketed as incense or herbal smoking blends, making it legal, but not anymore. As of March 1, the Drug Enforcement Administration temporarily banned five chemicals (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47, 497, and cannabicyclohexanol) used in producing synthetic             marijuana. The chemicals will be controlled for one year and possibly an additional six months as the DEA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services study them. According to the DEA, synthetic cannabinoids have been banned in at least 18 U.S. states and other countries due to rapid and significant rises in abuse of the substances Based on current scientific data, the five substances have a potential to be extremely harmful and threatening to public safety. A 19-year-old father overdosed from using synthetic drugs and died at a party in Minnesota during spring break while ten others, ages 16-22,     were hospitalized. According to the DEA, using synthetic marijuana could result in agitation, anxiety attacks, elevated heart rate, convulsions, nausea and vomiting. Last fall, UMHB administrators treated synthetic marijuana similar to the university’s policies on alcohol. At the beginning of the spring semester, UMHB established a “zero tolerance” policy outlined in the student handbook. Dean of Students Ray Martin described the university’s sudden change on this policy. “We had a choice. We could be proactive and protect our students, or we could wait and wait until somebody makes a rule,” he said. Crusaders will find the university’s stance on synthetic marijuana along with the disciplinary sanctions that will follow if...

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