Crusader Stadium
Sep24

Crusader Stadium

The end zone emerged as sophomore quarterback Zach Anderson raced down the right sideline. The turf propelled him; nearly 150 fi eld lights lit his way. More than 9,000 fans rose to witness the first touchdown at Crusader Stadium — football’s new home. Junior history major Matt Boden said that from his seat in the student section, he could see only purple and gold as he scanned the stadium. “All these people are here reppin’ the Cru .… I couldn’t even recognize any Wesley people,” he said. Attendance was 9,384, nearly all of them Crusaders. That’s what a home is filled with: family. On the field, the Cru handled business by marching on to a 35-7 victory over the Wolverines. It was what happened off the field that gave the team even more momentum. On Wednesday, Sept. 18, the game ball was run from Old Baylor in Independence, Texas. In 1845, the school was chartered in Independence. That started the run toward the opening of a new era. The historic run allowed students, staff and alumni the opportunity to honor the school’s heritage and carry the ball into the future. Senior pre-physical therapy major Stephanie Harris and her roommate ran four miles of the 150-mile trip around 6 a.m. “It was really exciting being a part of history at UMHB,” she said, “especially since it was my senior year.” The ball arrived in time for the rally Thursday night. Harris said she was honored when she saw the ball being run into the stadium—“knowing I had been a part of getting it there.” The rally itself gave students a chance to get ready for the game. Despite the rain, many students attended. “It was a really cool experience,” junior Christian ministries major Rusty Pregeant said. Students got to run out onto the field before filing into the student section. At the rally, the students learned what is being called the “Cru Dance” which “gets you pumped up,” Pregeant said. In the moments before the game, Crusaders gathered to eat and fellowship. “The tailgating was better than in the past,” junior marketing major T.J. Kittrell said. “It was a good environment…. It brought together the UMHB students.” There was a crulectric buzz at the start of the game. The time had come. For the national anthem, students stretched an American flag that covered well over half of the field. Senior social work major Allison Kelley was one of more than 100 students who held the flag. “Being on the brand new field and holding the American flag was emotional,” she said. Vintage warplanes performed a fly-by. “It had a cool...

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Oldest Living Crusader Leaves Lasting Impression
Sep24

Oldest Living Crusader Leaves Lasting Impression

Students know the university’s motto: Education for life, experience of a lifetime. But 1929 graduate Mary Alice Marshall was determined to let her lessons run further into a lifetime than most. The memories of her college days might seemingly remain a blur at the age of 104, making her the oldest living Crusader. Still, the Temple resident remembers her time at Baylor Female College as if it were yesterday. “I had some very happy years there.” Marshall said as she thought back to her most interesting stories. “I was president of the student body my senior year,” she said. Upon her election as class president, she and the former student body president attended a national conference for leadership where she spent her evenings talking up Baylor College, persuading a mass crowd to visit the campus after permission from then president Dr. J.C. Hardy. “That was the year Luther Hall burned down,” she said. “So we didn’t get to entertain (our guests).” Although her days on campus included one of the campus’ most devastating events, she enjoyed them. “Martha, my roommate, and I would go (to Luther) an hour before dinner, and I would play the piano, and she would sing,” Marshall said. “We did that a lot of evenings.” Born and raised in New Boston, Texas, Marshall began her studies at Baylor Female College in 1925 where she earned a Bachelor of Arts in music education. Following graduation, she readily received a top position in Kingsville’s public schools. “I was the music supervisor,” she said. “I would go to the elementary school in the morning and the high school in the afternoon.” She married the district’s superintendent, Robert Marshall, and had two children. Together they moved around Texas until settling in Temple in 1944. Marshal went on to earn her master’s at Baylor University. “I’m indebted to the old Methodists, but it’s interesting that I’ve gone to two Baptist schools,” Marshall said. “Everyone on campus knew I was Methodist.” Even President Hardy referred to her as “the little Methodist girl.” Although her religious beliefs differed from most students on campus, she does not regret her decision to attend. “I really believe that my leadership that I have was developed at Baylor Female College,” Marshall said. Her presidency offered many leadership advantages After a decade in Temple, she earned a top position as the head of the music department at Temple College where she worked for 18 years. After nearly eight decades of post-graduation living, it’s more than just school spirit that keeps Marshall venturing. “I’ve kept an interest in things,” she said. In addition to being an active member...

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Roommates: Through Thick and Thin
Sep24

Roommates: Through Thick and Thin

One of the most terrifying parts of first arriving at college is meeting your first roommate. You have probably never met before and yet  have been paired to live together for at least a semester. Images from the horror movie, The Roommate, surely creep into the minds of students as they drive to Belton for move-in day. While their own first roommate stories don’t unfold as violently, some can be horrific in their own way. However, on rare occasions, roommates hit it off, and they become best friends. Senior education major Chad Manns wasn’t sure what to think about his roommate, senior mathematics major Ryan Frusha, when they first moved into McLane Hall their freshman year. “For the first two or three weeks, it was pretty awkward. We talked about school, and that was it,” Manns said. “I think the thing that brought us together was our music. I was listening to Usher, and he was like ‘you like this music?’” Once they discovered their similar taste in tunes, the duo decided to make some music videos.    Frusha said that was when he started to get to know his roommate better. “The first time we met, he was real quiet, and I was more upbeat. And then he came out of his shell a little bit when we did those videos,” he said. Whether or not they would be roommates past their freshman year was never mentioned between Frusha and Manns. It was an unnecessary conversation. “If anything, it was when the housing process came, we expected to stay roommates. The conversation was more of who’s going to be our third roommate,” Frusha said. Usually differences and disagreements are reasons why freshman roommates don’t stay together. Frusha and Manns are exceptions to the rules. “We’ve only had probably two arguments. But they’ve all been about sports,” Manns said, laughing. They both enjoy playing and watching basketball. However, Manns is an avid Dallas Mavericks fan while Frusha chooses to root for the Miami Heat. For many this could be an obstacle to friendship given the hot rivalry that has developed between the two teams over the past several years. “We weren’t at each other’s throats about it,” Frusha said. “When the Mavs won, he was pretty cool about it. Whenever they were beating the Heat, he wouldn’t bring it up. Then the next year when the Heat crushed them, I never said anything about it.” Their friendship doesn’t end once they leave Belton. This past summer, Frusha and Manns went to Hawaii to do mission work. They said the experience helped them grow closer spiritually. Another duo that has withstood...

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McLane College of Business
Sep10

McLane College of Business

Gracing the face of UMHB’s College of Business is the name of Drayton McLane Jr., one of the most successful Texas businessmen in the past few decades. On Aug. 28, university president Dr. Randy O’Rear announced that the College of Business will now be named the McLane College of Business. The decision was made public at Convocation, right before McLane addressed the audience as the keynote speaker. “It’s a great honor…. At first we didn’t think we deserved something like this, but they continued to talk to us, and we felt it was a great honor and we just feel very honored to be associated with the university,” McLane said in a press conference after Convocation. He also talked about his involvement in the community and university. “I’ve always felt a part of UMHB, and we have made contributions in the past. I’ve made talks at the business school over the last few years and felt a part of it even though I didn’t go to school here,” he said. McLane is the former owner of the Houston Astros, member of a successful family business and strong supporter of Christian universities. “I think what we need in America and in Texas more is higher Christian education. Christian universities are kind of declining in population .… I think a certain amount of the population really wants to be involved in Christian higher education.” He is not the only one who feels honored to have his name associated with the university. Interim dean of the College of Business Dr. Paul Stock is happy to have the name McLane recognized with the college. “We’re pretty excited about it. Drayton McLane and the McLane family have had a relationship with UMHB for a long time. And it kind of raises the bar for us because the way the McLane family stands for integrity and honesty and community service with Christian values, and we’re hoping it really inspires our students and faculty going forward,” Stock said. McLane was born in Cameron, Texas, and after attending college, he returned to Cameron where he began working the family’s wholesale grocery business. Being family did not provide him any shortcuts to success. O’Rear retold the story, saying McLane’s father “believed that to be an effective leader, you had to earn the respect of all of the employees. So he offered Drayton a job loading trucks on the night shift.” Over the next 20 years, McLane worked his way through the ranks of the business and eventually became the executive vice president. In 1978 he became the president and chief executive officer. The McLane Company is a food...

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Running Man No More
Sep10

Running Man No More

For the first time in years, students will not be able to hold the traditional running man game due to the Belton police forbidding the activity from continuing. The first running man event of the school year was set to take place Aug. 23 until students found that it had become illegal. Running man was the ultimate competition of speed, stealth and wit on campus. Students donned dark clothing and after congregating at the softball and baseball parking lot, sprint across campus trying to make their way to the Meyer Christian Studies Building without being spotted by drivers who patrol the roads looking for runners. As can be guessed, there have been some problems with the logistics of running man. Students often got lost or ended up in the back yards of Belton residents. On one such occasion, two years ago, I was a freshman enjoying the thrill of a game of running man, when I discovered that I, along with a large group of other runners, were lost on what may or may not have been campus property. Students fell into poison ivy and others fell into one of the creeks we crossed before we eventually made our way back onto campus. Without proper guidelines and familiarity of the area, students can wander off and maybe end up having to jump the fences of Belton residents. This is where the real problem occurs. If a local resident sees two or three people dressed in black slinking around their backyard, that person may call the police or even get out a shotgun, and who could blame them? After all, clichés like “We don’t dial 911” and “Shoot first. Ask questions later” are considered proverbs by many Texans. Because of this potential for catastrophe, running man will no longer be a part the UMHB tradition, but question to ask is why now? Could it be possible to change the criteria boundaries of the game in order to make it better? It has been an ongoing ritual for years, but the event has just now been stopped. The growth of the university is likely a reason. More students coming to campus means more students participating in running man, which theoretically leads to more lost students stumbling through someone’s back yard. Another con of running man happens to be when a runner is spotted by a truck. To signify that a player is out of the game, the caught person climbs into the back of the truck and spends the rest of the game looking for others still sneaking toward Meyer. Obviously, this leads to a large number of students squeezing into the back of...

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Cru Sibs Graduate
Apr23

Cru Sibs Graduate

When students come for their first semester at UMHB, they are dubbed Crusaders for life.  With this new title comes a sense of unification; people begin to form bonds that can truly last a lifetime.  But some students developed these connections long ago. “Cru Sibs,” as they refer to themselves, are students who have a sibling also attending the university.  Throughout the university’s history, there have been many sets of Cru Sibs, each with their own unique stories of how the siblings came to attend the same school. Many little Cru Sibs actually chose this university because their older Cru Sib introduced them to the campus. “It was a trip to visit Ashleigh that made me decide to come here.  She showed me everything she loved, and I loved it too,” sophomore international business major Hallie Holden said. Holden’s older Cru Sib is senior nursing major Ashleigh Holden.  Hallie spent a weekend with her sister exploring the campus and learning about college life and chose to apply the next week.  The two have lived together for the last two semesters. Ashleigh said after graduation, she will miss rooming with her sister more than anything.  Though the two lived together the first 18 years of Ashleigh’s life, she explained that the dynamic was so different at college than at home. “We didn’t have our parents telling us what to do, but rather had to rely on each other for answers to our questions and concerns,” Ashleigh said. Next year, Ashleigh plans on moving to Waco to be a labor and delivery nurse at Hillcrest Baptist Medical Center.  While nervous about the change, she is glad to be less than an hour away from her sister. Hallie admitted she will be sad to see Ashleigh go, but is thankful for the time she was able to spend with her sister.  Much of Hallie’s involvement at the university has been influenced by Ashleigh’s experiences. Freshman nursing major Cally Baucom also referred to her sister, senior social work major Mary Baucom, for advice on organizations to join, committees to participate in and other campus activities. As a first-year student, Cally loved having a built-in source for advice and said she will miss this most of all when Mary graduates in May.  Cally may have learned about college life from watching Mary, but being a Cru Sib taught Mary as well. “I learned how to be more intentional as an older sibling, and how to really love her well,” Mary said. Both Ashleigh and Mary said that their favorite memory as Cru Sibs was the men’s national basketball game that took place April 7....

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