The impact of COVID-19 on UMHB’s nursing program
Oct05

The impact of COVID-19 on UMHB’s nursing program

By Regan Murr The spread of COVID-19 has had a dramatic effect across the globe and, most noticeably, on the medical field.  Nurses stand on the front lines in the fight against the coronavirus, often at great personal risk, as they struggle to combat the pandemic.  This outbreak, coupled with an ongoing nursing shortage in the United States, has profoundly impacted the environment that future nursing students must confront after they graduate.  At the University of Mary Hardin- Baylor, students in the nursing program face having to adapt to many changes in learning methods and class structures, while also preparing for their future careers in a profession that continues to face unique challenges. Molly Radar, a senior nursing student at the university, plans to work in pediatrics after her graduation next spring.  She describes the transition to CRUflex classes this semester as “cool, but…wild and weird.” “It’s crazy that I will be starting a job, maybe, during a global pandemic,” said Radar.  “It’s kind of terrifying.” Junior UMHB nursing major Hannah Glass studies in between classes for an upcoming exam in the Townsend Memorial Library on campus in September 2020. Photo by Malaika Randolph At the same time, the pandemic has highlighted, perhaps more than ever, the need for more nurses in the workforce.  According to the American Nurses Association, there is projected to be far more nursing jobs available as compared to any other profession in 2022.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that 1.1 million new registered nurses will be needed by 2022 to replace retirees and to avoid a continued shortage. When asked whether or not she was concerned about her future career during COVID-19, senior nursing student Sarah Hughes said: “No, because we’re needed.” Hughes also stated that she felt ready to enter the profession. “As nurses, we’re going to be dealing with a whole lot of infectious stuff all the time,” Hughes said.  “This is just a new infectious disease that we have to deal with.” Junior UMHB nursing major Hannah Glass studies in between classes for an upcoming exam in the Townsend Memorial Library on campus in September 2020. Photo by Malaika Randolph Nursing schools may also be facing dramatic fluctuations in applications due to COVID-19.  According to Ilana Kowarski’s  article in  U.S. News and World Report , “How coronavirus affects nursing school admissions,”  universities such as Villanova in Pennsylvania and Regis College in Massachusetts, have witnessed an increase in nursing school applications, which may be due to the pandemic. Still, it is possible that safety concerns may result in fewer applicants to nursing schools across the board, according to Kowarski’s article.  Only...

Read More
Flu shots now available on campus!
Sep24

Flu shots now available on campus!

It is already time to get a flu shot, and because of COVID, it is especially important to take care that this year, as soon as possible. With COVID-19 being one respiratory illness we have to be vigilantly guard against, having the risk of a second respiratory disease infecting people at the same time presents and even worse scenario. This possibility of two respiratory diseases infecting people either at once or in tandem, affects individuals as well as the collective on campus and all of us at home with our families and loved ones. It also presents, with more people sick from two diseases, the chance that hospitals will be inundated this season. To help get better control over our health this season for yourself and others, you can schedule your flu shot with Nurse Debbie  (Rosenberger, CSN, RN-BC) in Health Services in the Mabee Student Success Center building on the third floor. She has provided the following information about getting the shot: Flu shots are now available for $20 – cash or check; while supplies last. To get the shot, please Email healthservices@umhb.edu with your ID number and date and time at which you would like to have an appointment, and you will receive an email confirmation.  (There are NO appointments between noon-1pm daily.)  Bring your filled out flu shot consent form and have your funds ready. Again, BRING your completed form and $20 with you to the appointment.   Also, be sure to maintain social distancing and wear your mask.  If you are ill – do NOT keep your appointment. Nurse Debbie will need you to have already filled out and signed a consent form for the shot. You can download it and print it out, and sign and again, be sure to take it with you.  It can be found here. The flu shot is especially important this year because the COVID virus will still be something any of us can catch, and we have been warned of a second wave of infections. Therefore, we need to be sure we are protected from at least one of these diseases that we can already control with a vaccine. Nurse Debbie says another reason to get the flu shot this season is that, as the CDC advises points out, it prevents suspicions of COVID from putting more people in quarantine and/or in isolation for 10-14 days, which can be a long time when trying to complete a semester of school.  Although some people feel that they have flu symptom after taking the shot, that is because the antibodies are working to protect the body from the more serious outbreak. Most people...

Read More
Cultures displayed at UMHB festival
Apr02

Cultures displayed at UMHB festival

The Multicultural Festival is an annual event that is put together to celebrate the diverse cultures that are on UMHB’s campus. This year’s event was held on Wednesday, March 20 on the third floor of Bawcom Student Union. Many different events took place at the event to feature and appreciate culture. Some of the events included a Tai Chi demonstration, praise dance, Mandarin poem readings, henna tattoos and traditional Japanese tea ceremonies. The first event of the night was a Tai Chi demonstration to relax. However, he changed directions when he stated that it could also be used for self- defense. The demonstration was interactive, as he got students to participate, and it was very informative. Another interesting event that took place during the night was a praise dance demonstration that was put on by junior nursing major Skaiye Finney. She did an outstanding job at incorporating worship into this event. Her dance was very interpretive and she also incorporated sign language. Before she began, she shared a quick PowerPoint about the background of praise and worship dancing. Her showcase was also very interactive, as she got the audience to sign with her as she danced. Spanish students and professors took time to read poems in Spanish with the audience. Dr. Madison, professor of UMHB’s Spanish I and II classes, was not planning on reading a poem, but she was asked to read a poem for the audience in place of a student that could not make it. She read a poem titled “Bala- da de los abuelos” by Nicolas Guillen. The poem was about an Afro-Cuban man that had to deal with two different kinds of racism while in Cuba. It was a very moving piece and was well-recited by Dr. Madison. Several cultures were on display, and the people that attended the event were able to learn about cultures with which they were unfamiliar. Many people came to partake in this showcase of cultures and left with a better understanding and appreciation of them. This is an event you do not want to miss when it comes around next...

Read More
Students honor Month of the Military Child
Apr02

Students honor Month of the Military Child

The month of April is known for numerous holidays such as Easter, April Fools’ Day and Earth Day. However, what many people don’t know is that April is also the Month of the Military Child. This is a special time of the year dedicated to honoring the children of military parents all over the world. UMHB takes great pride in recognizing students who fall into that category. There are approximately two million military children all over the U.S., ranging from newborns all the way up to 18-year-olds (sheerid). Their lives seem to be no easy task, as many of them endure lots of challenges such as anxiety, separation and relocation. “One of the most challenging things about being a military kid is moving around,” said Micki Hutchins, a freshman social work major. “I learned to only make surface-level friends because moving away from a best friend after two to three years over and over again became too painful. However, I have a great relationship with my immediate family because of this.” Many organizations around the world take advantage of the month and hold events to honor those who are children of military parents. The Department of Defense Education Activity and The Department of Defense team work together to encourage schools to plan events dedicated to the Month of the Military Child. Operation Megaphone is a worldwide event dedicated to connecting military teens around the world and helping them discuss everyday issues that they face. Many group seven hold specific days for  people to wear purple in an effort to show their support. A lot of organizations also hold events such as contests and festivals. Senior filmstudies major Viranda Brooks described events that she has participated in. “When I was younger and lived on a base in Germany, they had a big carnival with free prizes and food,” she said. “It was a lot of fun.” While their parents are deployed in other parts of the country, many dependents have to find ways to cope with the fact that their parents are gone. Some children do not understand why their parents have to leave for such long periods of time, and this can make them angry. Being able to communicate is one of the most important ways children of military parents can deal with their parents’ absence. Writing letters is one of the main ways they communicate, as many people in the military do not have access to cell phones or other communication devices. It is also important for people of authority such as teachers, counselors and non-military parents to be as helpful and supportive as possible. “I would always go to my mom and see...

Read More
Dr. Joey Tabarlet: Professor and friend
Apr02

Dr. Joey Tabarlet: Professor and friend

UMHB’s Communication and Media Studies Department chair Dr. Joey Tabarlet has been inspiring students on campus since 1995. Tabarlet is also a movie buff, cat lover, dad-joke comedian and guitarist. Besides teaching, his research explores major historical events in mass media and moral depictions in film. He has also been involved with curriculum development and assessments. Tabarlet has been president of the UMHB faculty assembly and served on the Promotion and Tenure Committee, the Honors Committee and the Nominating Committee. He also founded the Central Texas Film Society. “I thought he was a very interesting professor to have,” freshman film studies major Sarah McGirk said. “He had a lot of interesting stories and real-world information that made the class easier to understand and relate to.” McGirk said that she felt challenged by the assignments he gave, and she noted that he always made sure to give feedback for improvements. Anytime she did not understand a topic, she said that he was very helpful in explaining things. “As a freshman, I found it refreshing to have a professor who treated his students like adults and let us talk and work at our own pace. While the class did require work, it felt accomplishable. I really loved having Dr. Tabarlet and hope I get to take another one of his classes sometime in my college career,” McGirk said. Tabarlet earned both his Bachelor and Master of Arts degrees from Louisiana State University. His doctorate is from Florida State University. He taught at Wesleyan College in Georgia for three years before coming to UMHB in 1995 as the chair of the Speech and Drama Department, which would later become the Department of Communication and Media Studies. Since then, Tabarlet has taught many courses including Introduction to Mass Media, Film Studies and Public Speaking. He credits his interest in the communication field to his experiences in high school and college. “I was on the speech debate team in high school and college,” Tabarlet said. “That was a turning point because that really determined what I wanted to do.” It was there that he found his love for speech and debate. “I’ve taught public speaking a lot,” Tabarlet said. “This semester is the first semester in 10 or 15 years I haven’t taught Public Speaking, so I really miss it.” Tabarlet’s colleagues are also appreciative of his contributions to the school. “I’ve worked with him for a number of years in the Honors program,” said English professor Brent Gibson. “I enjoy working with him and he’s been very helpful in the Honors Seminar. I really appreciate him as a colleague and enjoy his...

Read More
Faculty spotlight: Brandon Skaggs
Mar20

Faculty spotlight: Brandon Skaggs

Dr. Brandon Skaggs strongly advocates getting involved in campus activities. This comes from someone who was very involved in his own student career. When he attended UMHB as an undergraduate, he was Student Body President in 2003 while being involved in multiple organizations. “Every student should be involved in some sort of co-curricular experience, because it just helps them develop as a person,” Skaggs said. Some of the other activities and organizations Skaggs was involved with while at UMHB included Welcome Week, Student Government Association and Campus Activities Board, as well as Stunt Night and Crusader Knights. Now Vice President of Student Life at the University of Mary Hardin- Baylor, he works hard to help students get involved on campus. “We want to provide students with an experience outside of the classroom that can help you grow as a leader, a businessman or woman, a teacher or a civic leader in whatever community God calls you to,” he said. Dr. Skaggs stays very involved himself, opening his home to students and hosting dinner parties for student organizations such as the Association of Black Students, among others. He attends and plans numerous student led events to ensure that everyone has a safe and good time. He has a lot of support behind him in this effort. “I have a wonderful family that is very supportive, my wife loves the ministry we were called to which is the Mary Hardin-Baylor students, and my kids love being up here as well. You cannot do this job without any of them; they are my biggest supporters,” Skaggs said. Graduating with a double major in Business Management and Computer Information Systems in 2003, Skaggs then went on to earn an MBA in Finance and Management from Tarleton State University and a Doctorate in Higher Education Leadership from Dallas Baptist University. He began his career as Director of Admissions Recruitment at DBU, which led him to work as the Associate Vice President for Student Development and Dean of Students at Oklahoma Baptist University before coming home to UMHB. It seems that he brought back to UMHB that involvement and inspiration he had as a leading undergraduate. “Working alongside Dr. Brandon Skaggs has been a delight. I see his desire to “work at all things as if working for the Lord,” Yvette Shackelford, Administrative Assistant to Dr. Skaggs, said. “He has an ability to bring out the best in everyone that works alongside him. It has been a complete joy and blessing to work alongside...

Read More