Week reflects on missionaries’ stories
Oct29

Week reflects on missionaries’ stories

Missionaries who are serving all over the world converged on campus Oct. 19-23 during Missions Emphasis Week. The week included events and seminars whose purpose was to connect missionaries and students. One of these seminars was called “Latte for the Lord” and was led by Susan and Kelly Curry. In 1996, the Currys created a coffee shop called An Tobar Nua in Galway, Ireland. They were nicknamed ‘The Jesus people’ by the locals and have worked hard to create relations with the people of Galway. “They didn’t trust us for a long time… they thought we were a cult. They thought we were going to pull them away from the Catholic Church,” Kelly Curry had said, “In the beginning it was so slow and we played monopoly in the afternoon because no one was there.” Kelly told a story of how a woman had come to them with her husband who was suffering from depression. The couple had taken a three-hour bus ride to get to the coffee shop, where they were prayed over by the staff for at least an hour. After three weeks Kelly called to check up on the man and found out that after 11 years his depression broke on the bus ride home. Junior Elementary Education major Beth Ann Earley was particularly moved by the Curry’s story and said she knows mission work is in her future. “I personally feel called to missions. I have always found other cultures interesting and there are so many human rights needs around the world,” Early said. “People don’t have the things that we have and we can do something about it.” The missionaries were also invited to speak to classes throughout the week. A young missionary spoke to Sara Billingsley’s literature class, and the junior Christian studies major was inspired by what he said. “[The missionary] graduated from UMHB and he came and talked about his Journeyman term. He served in Nepal and worked on sharing the gospel to unreached people groups,” Billingsley said, “It was encouraging to meet someone who graduated from UMHB who decided to commit to mission work. It was nice to get some advice on that kind of stuff.” Baptist Student Ministry Director Shawn Shannon said MEW raises awareness about the need, opportunity, purposefulness, and joy of missions. “We pray for missionaries to be in transforming conversations that help others connect their personal vocations,” she said. “We seek opportunities for missionaries to engage in relationships with students, staff, faculty, and local churches.” Some of the events on campus were the glow run, girls/boys night out, coffee house, the world market, and the prayer...

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Family weekend returns to campus

By Starr Rivers It’s six weeks into the fall semester of college and although students hate to admit it, they are beginning to miss their nagging parents and annoying siblings. In order to give students a little piece of home and give parents the chance to see what their kids are up to on campus, UMHB hosted its annual Family Weekend Oct 2 and 3, with a string of events displaying UMHB traditions. The weekend began with Museum Tours at the Musick Alumni Center. Next, parents were given the chance to meet representatives from the UMHB’s President Council and Student Organizations to get a better feel of who exactly is pouring into their student’s lives and how they can get involved. Residential halls were also open to the families to see where (and how) students are living on campus. As the sun went down, students and families were treated to the musical Little Mary Sunshine presented by the UMHB Department of Music. The annual Family Weekend Pep Rally followed, where families were greeted with snare drums and cheers at Luther Memorial. The Blackshirt Cru Spirit Band, Sader Belles, and Cru Cheer Team also performed, pumping the parents up before the big game the following day. The night ended with a Family Weekend Hangout, presented by CAB, which consisted of video games, board games, and live music performed by students. Saturday morning began with a Spiritual Life and BSM Worship Service in Presser Hall, led by the families themselves. The Faculty Brunch followed, where parents were given a continental breakfast in Great Hall. The meal gave them a chance to get to know their students’ professors. Kickin’ It On King Street was one of the highlights of the weekend. There were plenty of spirit tables, lawn games, and music to get everyone in the mood for the game. Students were also eager to show their parents UMHB’s pregame tradition of welcoming the Crusader Football team and getting pumped to the sound of the Cru Spirit Band. The last event was watching Crusader Football dominate against Belhaven University. The stands were filled with students, parents, siblings, and smiling faces. Grabbing a cup of CRUnilla and a bag of popcorn, UMHB families watched the Crusaders lead the game with ease, the score reaching 50-0 by halftime. “My brother [Baylor] plays football here, my dad Kieth coaches and my mother Shelly is the Residential Director for Farris Hall,” Landry Mullins said. “So Family Weekend is always a huge deal. The atmosphere on the UMHB campus during this weekend is one of the best.” Although Family Weekend is for parents, it is also a...

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Art exhibit shows Jesus in stills

By Jasmin Ortiz Hauntingly beautiful black and white lithographs make up the Otto Dix: Matthaus Evangelium art exhibit being hosted by the UMHB Art Department of the University from Sept. 24 until Oct. 15. The exhibit tells the story of Christ through the eyes of a World War I survivor. Otto Dix was a modern artist, who lived through two world wars before dying in 1969. Dix is considered one of the greatest German Expressionist artists of the 20th Century. In the exhibit being held at the university, his war experiences are evident in his work. “The work is typical of the heightened emotional quality common to the Expressionists of that era when World Wars I and II had so violently shaken societies all over the world,” Director and Professor of the Baugh Center for the Visual Arts Art Gallery Hershall Seals, said. “Otto Dix uses military dress from WWII to illustrate the injustice done to Jesus by having soldiers arresting Christ while they all wear the uniforms of German Nazis.” Many of his pieces became more religious in nature after Dix witnessed the atrocities of the religious persecution during the Holocaust. Each piece in this particular collection is representative of a moment of Jesus’ story with a WWII twist, such as the officials being dressed in Nazi war uniforms, representing the crucifixion of the Jewish people during the war. Seals said the work is shedding a new light on the presence of God in dire times. “I think that the artist is able to capture the story of Christ in a really beautiful and inspiring manner,” freshman undeclared major Aurora Upton said. The artist focuses on particular moments such as the fisherman who was blessed by Jesus and had his bounty multiplied. This exchange is represented in a still which shows the sincere moment when the man is holding the fish in reverence. This representative of how God provides, Seals said. Dix’s take on the story of Jesus Christ through the eyes of a man who has seen the hurts and trials of war, makes the artwork even more impactful. This exhibition is part of the Bowden Collection, which provides churches, seminaries, colleges, and museums across the United States with the opportunity to display religious...

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Red Bus Project ‘on the move for orphans’
Oct14

Red Bus Project ‘on the move for orphans’

Dozens of students crowded around a red double decker bus that was parked outside the Bawcom Student Union Building. The large vehicle is called the Red Bus Project, and its purpose is to attract students to buy items for sale and spread awareness about orhan care. The project is a mobile thrift store that travels from different college campuses, spreading awareness about the more than 140 million orphans around the world in need of hope. Their mission is to give the college students a chance to help by buying clothes at reasonable prices and donating clothes they have outgrown or no longer need. The money made is solely given to an orphan care system called Share Hope. Share Hope is the main base of the organization and is run by Steven Curtis Chapman and his wife Mary Beth Chapman. Their daughter, Emily Chapman, was attending Baylor University when she came up with the idea to get college students involved with helping orphans. Chapman and her family launched the Red Bus Project in 2012, and since then have visited over 60 different colleges. “The very first tour of the red bus actually came through my university, it was one of the first or second stops ever made. I went and hung out, figured out what it was all about, and fell in love.” Ashley West said, an intern for the Red Bus Project. Freshman nursing major Sedona Goad thinks the project is a great way to bring awareness of orphans to students. “I think it’s a really good organization and how they are doing it through thrifting,” Goad said. “It’s really “in” right now among college students and by going campus-to-campus and getting as much money as they can and donating it solely to the orphan care, I really admire that” Goad was so impressed with the organization that she decided to work with the project while they were on campus and help students involved. “I’m in FYC and at first we were required to take shifts, but then I got here and I talked to one of the people that runs the show and I was really interested and really glad that I could help. They gave me all these statistics about how every 18 seconds a person is orphaned so I want to do anything I can to help out.” Orphaned children often lose their voices and are overlooked and undervalued. The Red Bus Project wants to give those children a voice. Students who didn’t get a chance to participate in the Red Bus Project can always help.. Students can mail their old clothes to the organization, intern...

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BSM celebrates 95 years of serving UMHB
Oct14

BSM celebrates 95 years of serving UMHB

Ninety-five years ago, the 19th Amendment was passed, allowing women to vote, the American Professional Football League was formed, and the first ever Baptist Student Union in Texas was established at Baylor Female College. In 1920 the University of Mary-Hardin Baylor was chosen as the “laboratory” for the first BSU in Texas because of its roots in Christian faith and service. UMHB has always focused on the idea of teaching not only the knowledge found in books, but the knowledge found in knowing God. This is apparent in the 1945 Centennial Series: According To His Purpose. “During the past one hundred years… the college, and the student body itself have been concerned with ‘including the Christian religion within, and not just alongside of the educational process,’” according to the series. The University’s mission served as the foundation for organizations such as the Mission Circle, Women’s Ministry Union, Student Christian Association, Young Woman’s Auxiliary, and the Baptist Student Union. The name Baptist Student Union, however, was changed to the Baptist Student Ministry in 1994 to better describe the purpose of the organization. Despite this name change, the goal of the BSM has remained very much the same since its beginning in 1920. “[The BSU] has its object in the winning of others to Christ and His Church; the enlistment of Christians in Bible and Mission study… the calling out of the called for special service,” 1920 Student Secretary Joseph P. Boone said in a 1940s pamphlet about the ministry. Today the BSM offers over 20 ministries that impact the students as well as the community surrounding our campus. BSM director Shawn Shannon believes that the constant growth and change of the BSM is what has made it such a driving force on campus. “This is my 36th year in campus ministry. My 16th at UMHB. UMHB is a precious place. I am convinced that we can touch the world from here,” she said. Shannon is thankful her time here on campus and the opportunities it has provided for ministry. “The campus is a strategic place and the college season of life is crucial for making significant decisions… and what an incubator the campus is for relationships. What an important time to pursue Christ with others and for the sake of others,” Shannon said. It’s this passion for ministry that has inspired many students on campus to get involved with the BSM, including senior interdisciplinary studies education major Rebekah Peyton. “There is such an amazing peace in knowing that I am joined together in my UMHB experience with other students who are trying to follow Christ, lead ministries, and also be...

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Deaf but not disabled: Author visits campus, shares inspiring story
Oct14

Deaf but not disabled: Author visits campus, shares inspiring story

Almost 40 years ago, a six-year-old little girl lost her hearing due to a serious bout of spinal meningitis. Later, this same little girl would overcome many obstacles, become Miss Deaf America, adopt a Deaf child named Zoe, and publish a book. This little girl’s name was Brandi Rarus. “When I lost my hearing about 40 years ago, I had no idea what an incredible journey I would go through,” Rarus said. Rarus spoke to UMHB students on Wed. Aug. 7, during chapel services about her incredible story. “It showed everyone on campus that being Deaf is not a handicap. It was really exciting to meet Brandi,” sophomore English major Guillermo Lopez said. Once Rarus became Deaf, she struggled, lost between the hearing and Deaf worlds. Because she could hear and speak before she was 6, she remained in hearing education, until she attended a Deaf camp. This camp proved to be a turning point in Rarus’ life. “Camp Mark VII was a rude awakening for me. It changed me,” Rarus said. “Everyone signed. The cooks, the lifeguard… everyone.” While Rarus was at camp, a minister taught the children that being Deaf is a gift from God and that they did not need to be ashamed of it. “I realized that I was okay. I didn’t have to keep trying to become someone I couldn’t become. I really think had I not gone, I probably would have gone to a hearing college, and married a hearing man,” Rarus said. From this point on Rarus embraced her Deafness. Rarus attended a Deaf college and married Tim, a Deaf man. Later down the road, Rarus desperately wanted a baby girl. However, God had another plan for Rarus. She birthed 3 hearing boys, the first hearing children in 124 years on Tim’s side of the family. The Rurus’ were looking into adoption when they received a phone call from the agency saying they had a Deaf female child. The Rarus’ knew that this girl, Zoe, was meant for them. “Zoe found her way to her home, my home,” Rarus said. “I cannot count how many people have said she’s lucky to have me, but I want to say ‘no, I’m lucky to have her.’” After adopting Zoe, Rarus dabbled in writing articles, but she could not get them published. Then Zoe’s story idea was born. Rarus interviewed Zoe’s birth family, and her first adoptive family to compile a book. Through Rarus’ book, Zoe’s birth mother and father were able to let go of their animosity towards each other and forgive. “When I started the book, BJ and Jess did not talk to...

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