Personal trainers available to help students amp up fitness

Published in the October 12, 2016 issue of The Bells Motivation to workout can be difficult when you have classes, homework, a job, and a social life to juggle. However, staying fit in college is very critical to the wellbeing of a student. According to Health, 70% of students gain weight during their four years in college. Fortunately, the university has a solution for students who desire to take their fitness to the next level – personal training. “It’s a great way for [students] to learn more about weightlifting, about nutrition, and if they want to achieve weight loss, how to do that safely,” said Sue Weaver, Director of Campus Recreation. All trainers at UMHB are certified and work around a student’s schedule. “A lot of [personal training] is about doing things the right way and doing things the safe way,” Weaver said. “The other thing is that they get personal attention.” What’s interesting about this program is that not only do trainers work around a student’s schedule to find the right time to have a session, but participants also have workout sessions tailored to their needs. “We try to match our trainers to what [student’s] are looking for. So if a trainer’s never done a triathlon, and somebody’s interested in doing a triathlon, we’re going to try to find somebody to do that,” Weaver said. If a student does not want to work out by themselves, they have the option to do a session with a friend or a group of friends. “One of the things you can do in personal training is you can actually do a buddy session with a partner,” Weaver said. “Both you and a friend can get a personal trainer together and then you can have two accountability partners, your trainer and your buddy.” One of the trainers, John Daulton, has been a personal trainer for four years and is certified through ISSA (International Sports Sciences Association). He says that there are many fitness activities one can participate in, from a beginner’s level overview of general fitness, to navigating the weight room and improving on a certain sport. Daulton says that students should participate in the personal training program if they want to gain more knowledge on the correct way to exercise. Student’s can apply for the personal training program by picking up an application at Mayborn’s Fitness Center. After choosing a personal trainer, the next step would be to choose which package you would like to purchase. If you want a single session, the cost of training is $25, whereas a group session would be $10 a person. After you fill out...

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Have you found your church home?
Sep28

Have you found your church home?

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells A study conducted by the Barna group shows that approximately 40 percent of college students do not retain their faith during their college years. The university not only wants to cultivate a student’s education, but also their faith. University Chaplain, Dr. George Loutherback, believes that finding a church that fits one’s needs is essential for a college student. “A local church connection is very important for community, spiritual growth, and for feeling connected,” Loutherback said. “A local church offers opportunities for ministry investment, a chance to be with peers in a worship experience, [and] a chance to learn and be taught by someone who is gifted in the ability to teach.” For students searching for a church, Loutherback suggests talking with other students, visiting several churches in the area, and picking the one that the student enjoys attending the best. Churches of all different denominations can be found in the Belton/Temple/Killeen area, most of them offering college groups for local students. First United Methodist Church in Belton even offers a home-cooked lunch on Wednesdays for college students in exchange for a small donation. Students can enjoy fellowshipping with peers and church members during this time. For those who don’t have a transportation method or simply want to worship close to home, Everyday Disciples Church has weekly services on-campus in the Bell Baptist Association. “The Bell Baptist Association uses their building as a church plant incubator for free, so we are taking advantage of the space and opportunity to be on-campus,” Pastor Rich Diaz said. Outside of finding a church home, students can grow spiritually through service opportunities through the university’s Baptist Student Ministry. Some of the ministries led by the BSM include Drama Ministry, Hospital Ministry, Helping Hands, Hope for the Hungry, Random Acts of Kindness, and Worship in the Quad. Other ministries include Cru Catholics, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and Small groups, an on-campus Bible study organized by Temple Bible Church. “I think it’s important to get involved in ministries in college because you need to figure out how to stay rooted in your faith,” said Children’s Ministry co-leader sophomore Spanish major Rosie Sawatzki. “When you’re away from home the first time it’s easy to get distracted by all the things in the world, and we need to set aside time to be reminded who we are to Him and in Him.” Sawatzki believes that through Children’s Ministry she’s able to live out Jesus’ teachings about loving her neighbors. “Being with the kids helps me realize that I’m working towards something with real meaning,” Sawatzki said. “I get...

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Campus celebrates heritage
Feb16

Campus celebrates heritage

Charter Day is a celebration that never ceases to bring current students and alumni together in awe of the growth of the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor. This year, UMHB’s birthday was celebrated with balloons, cake, and the ceremonial placing of flowers on Judge Baylor’s grave. “We take Charter Day to remember how much Judge Baylor did to build UMHB,” said Student Foundation President Autumn Brewer. “We also pray to God and thank Him for his faithfulness to the school, and we ask Him to continue to pour blessings out to us.” While students might have been motivated to blow out the candles of UMHB’s 171st birthday party because of the free cupcakes, the desire for Crusaders to observe Charter Day has long been a priority. Over the years, Charter Day became an invitation to all alumni to reconnect with their classmates, relive old memories, and continue traditions. UMHB Museum Director Betty Sue Beebe said the university has continued to grow throughout the years. “Although a lot has changed at [Mary Hardin-Baylor], it is great to see the positive changes on campus for students these days.” During Beebe’s reign as Alumni Director, students helped orchestrate these weekend-long festivities, which gave the alumni a chance to see the continued focus on character and diversity in Mary Hardin-Baylor’s halls. The importance placed on community is not new to UMHB, however. A concept kin to activities put on by sororities today was alive and well before the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor even had its current name. Upperclassmen, called Big Sisters, took on new freshmen (appropriately labelled Little Sisters) to mentor, support, and encourage through their first two years of college. Although there is no longer “Bigs” and “Littles” on campus, older students still take younger students under their wing. Brewer said she’s experienced that same sense of family during her years at UMHB. “It was amazing to see smiling faces who care about me and who I get to live life with,” she said. “I had sophomores and juniors pouring into me and supporting me my freshmen year.” Community is one of the cornerstones of UMHB. The gesture that brought the university from Independence to Belton was from the pastor of First Baptist Church Belton at the time. The city of Temple offered UMHB a $30,000 contract, but at the pastor’s insistence, the community of Belton pulled together to raise $31,000, and UMHB transferred to Belton. The pastor found it important to encourage female education, and “Baylor Female College” helped achieve that goal. Celebrating the birthday of the university gives students and alumni the opportunity to look back into time, and to marvel at...

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Campus discusses concealed carry
Dec08

Campus discusses concealed carry

The university hosted an open forum on Nov. 19 to discuss Senate Bill 11. The Bill states that anyone who has a Concealed Handgun License can open carry on campus. It is mandatory for public universities, however for private universities it is optional. UMHB has the option to completely follow the bill, partially follow it, or disregard it completely. The university currently allows handguns on campus if you have a CHL. However, it must stay in your car. Dr. Steve Theodore, Senior Vice President for Administration & Chief Operating Officer, and Gary Sargent, Chief of Police, held the forum in the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center. The rules of the forum? Raise your hand, use the microphone, introduce yourself, and address the panel. “This is not a debate between you and us,” Theodore said. “The administration has no opinion on it right now. Please state your opinion clearly, be brief, and be respectful. We’re all adults here.” The forum started off with freshman social work major, Grace Scott, mentioning the CHL process and what she has observed. “My father is a CHL instructor. [The CHL students] are there to protect themselves and their families,” she said “I don’t think we should put a limitation on this law.” Indy Henderson, a DPT major, took the mic and brought up the topic of police response time. “The average time for the police to arrive at the scene is three to five minutes,” he said. “A lot of people can die in that time”. Dr. Theodore responded to the student’s concerns by explaining the police force evaluation process and the presence level of police on campus. “We always evaluate our police department. We have 24/7 security or police on campus. Now are we going to have a police officer in every building? Probably not. But we do like to evaluate.” Soon after, Colton Hendrick, a junior church music major asked about the current safety regulations regarding tasers and pepper spray. Mediator’s explained that the UMHB Police offer self-defense classes, and mace, stun guns and knives (depending on the size) are allowed on campus. Hope Herring, a mental health graduate student, and a survivor of the Fort Hood mass shooting in 2014, spoke up about her experiences and what she has learned from them. “I’ve been a CH holder for four years and in the military for six years. It is vital for Senate Bill 1 to be at UMHB. I am a survivor from the Fort Hood shooting. The entire incident took 15 minutes. Three were killed, 15 wounded. Out of the 16 people who were military trained, only two had...

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Homecoming week full of Cru traditions
Nov19

Homecoming week full of Cru traditions

ssert party, lemur kissing and a Crusader win. The 2015 University of Mary Hardin-Baylor homecoming week that took place Sunday. Nov. 8 through Saturday, Nov. 14, had a little something for everyone to enjoy. “Homecoming’s been fun. I was on the action committee which was interesting to be a part of. It was fun to help out with everything they needed. Set up, tear down; I was just there,” freshman nursing major Sammy Pilkington said. Throughout the week, the student organizations team gave away tanks and gift cards at various locations on campus. Some students even had to sing or answer questions to receive their prize. Students also participated in a weeklong event called The Hunt. Participants were asked to take pictures at various locations on and off campus to compete for the golden ticket. Winners of the golden ticket sat in a special balcony in Bawcom Student Union for the Cru’s game against East Texas Baptist University on Saturday. Shelby Halloran and Ryan Tyler-Coronado won the special prize. Another event, Clash of Classes, took place at the Recreation Courts on Tuesday at 9 p.m., where members from each class went head-to-head in a dodge ball competition. The sophomores took the victory. Students also took advantage of Relax and Unwind that took place on Thursday at 9 p.m. The university brought in food trucks for the first time, and Cue the Sun Band and Adam Fischer + Hunter Rea Band performed. Hot chocolate and s’mores were also available during the event. While students enjoyed refreshments, UMHB ATPE had university chaplain Dr. Loutherback kiss a lemur for Project Apple Tree. During the week, students voted with $1 tickets to choose which staff member would kiss the creature. Students could choose from Vice-President of Student Life, Dr. Byron Weathersbee, BSM Director, Dr. Shawn Shannon, or Director of Spititual Life, Dr. George Loutherback. Project Apple Tree raises money to buy school supplies for children in the Belton area. The lucky winner, was forced to put barbecue sauce on his lips before Mozzy, the lemur, kissed him. “It was unlike anything I’ve ever experienced,” Loutherback said. “The lemur was very aggressive, but it was fun. I’ve never done it before, so this is a first for me.” Stunt Night was also part of the homecoming festivites and took place on Thursday and Friday night at 7 p.m. Each class performed a ten minute skit based on the theme, vintage video games, which was chosen by the sophomore class. The freshman, who chose Pong as their game, told the story of a freshman girl, Claire, struggling between staying at UMHB or transferring to another...

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Class prepares students for missions
Nov19

Class prepares students for missions

The Bible says that it is the responsibility of the believers to deliver the Gospel to everybody. But language barriers can sometimes get in the way of witnessing to others. Spanish for Mission Work (SPAP 1340) is a class designed to close the gap between UMHB students and potential Spanish-speaking believers in Christ. “It is our hope that Spanish for Mission Work will link up with missionary programs,” said Gary Smith, Spanish for Mission Work Instructor. The course is designed for those who are interested in missions and also have the desire to learn more about the language and the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. The course will count as an elective credit and will possibly be available in the spring 2016 semester pending administration data results. Basic knowledge of Spanish is recommended, but it will not be required to take the course. The emphasis of the course will be learning various Biblical terms in Spanish, as well as how to deliver the Gospel to a Spanish speaker. The course is new, and those involved are very excited about the possibility of equipping more Spanish-speaking students for the mission field. “The author of the textbook works at Dallas University, and she is very excited to be part of what we are trying to do,” Smith said. UMHB has several mission-centered classes, and Smith is hopeful that the new course will add another successful missionary program to the university’s repertoire. Smith said if students want more information about the course and want to find out how to sign up, they should contact him at gary.smith@umhb.edu, or talk to any of the the other foreign language...

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