Cultures displayed at UMHB festival
Apr02

Cultures displayed at UMHB festival

The Multicultural Festival is an annual event that is put together to celebrate the diverse cultures that are on UMHB’s campus. This year’s event was held on Wednesday, March 20 on the third floor of Bawcom Student Union. Many different events took place at the event to feature and appreciate culture. Some of the events included a Tai Chi demonstration, praise dance, Mandarin poem readings, henna tattoos and traditional Japanese tea ceremonies. The first event of the night was a Tai Chi demonstration to relax. However, he changed directions when he stated that it could also be used for self- defense. The demonstration was interactive, as he got students to participate, and it was very informative. Another interesting event that took place during the night was a praise dance demonstration that was put on by junior nursing major Skaiye Finney. She did an outstanding job at incorporating worship into this event. Her dance was very interpretive and she also incorporated sign language. Before she began, she shared a quick PowerPoint about the background of praise and worship dancing. Her showcase was also very interactive, as she got the audience to sign with her as she danced. Spanish students and professors took time to read poems in Spanish with the audience. Dr. Madison, professor of UMHB’s Spanish I and II classes, was not planning on reading a poem, but she was asked to read a poem for the audience in place of a student that could not make it. She read a poem titled “Bala- da de los abuelos” by Nicolas Guillen. The poem was about an Afro-Cuban man that had to deal with two different kinds of racism while in Cuba. It was a very moving piece and was well-recited by Dr. Madison. Several cultures were on display, and the people that attended the event were able to learn about cultures with which they were unfamiliar. Many people came to partake in this showcase of cultures and left with a better understanding and appreciation of them. This is an event you do not want to miss when it comes around next...

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Students honor Month of the Military Child
Apr02

Students honor Month of the Military Child

The month of April is known for numerous holidays such as Easter, April Fools’ Day and Earth Day. However, what many people don’t know is that April is also the Month of the Military Child. This is a special time of the year dedicated to honoring the children of military parents all over the world. UMHB takes great pride in recognizing students who fall into that category. There are approximately two million military children all over the U.S., ranging from newborns all the way up to 18-year-olds (sheerid). Their lives seem to be no easy task, as many of them endure lots of challenges such as anxiety, separation and relocation. “One of the most challenging things about being a military kid is moving around,” said Micki Hutchins, a freshman social work major. “I learned to only make surface-level friends because moving away from a best friend after two to three years over and over again became too painful. However, I have a great relationship with my immediate family because of this.” Many organizations around the world take advantage of the month and hold events to honor those who are children of military parents. The Department of Defense Education Activity and The Department of Defense team work together to encourage schools to plan events dedicated to the Month of the Military Child. Operation Megaphone is a worldwide event dedicated to connecting military teens around the world and helping them discuss everyday issues that they face. Many group seven hold specific days for  people to wear purple in an effort to show their support. A lot of organizations also hold events such as contests and festivals. Senior filmstudies major Viranda Brooks described events that she has participated in. “When I was younger and lived on a base in Germany, they had a big carnival with free prizes and food,” she said. “It was a lot of fun.” While their parents are deployed in other parts of the country, many dependents have to find ways to cope with the fact that their parents are gone. Some children do not understand why their parents have to leave for such long periods of time, and this can make them angry. Being able to communicate is one of the most important ways children of military parents can deal with their parents’ absence. Writing letters is one of the main ways they communicate, as many people in the military do not have access to cell phones or other communication devices. It is also important for people of authority such as teachers, counselors and non-military parents to be as helpful and supportive as possible. “I would always go to my mom and see...

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Heart of Gold Dance Marathon
Apr02

Heart of Gold Dance Marathon

Student organization Heart of Gold turned McLane Great Hall into a circus full of fun with games, food and dance lessons for their annual Dance Marathon on Friday, March 22. The event is hosted by colleges across the country with the purpose of raising money for children with pediatric illnesses. The idea behind the event is to gather a group of people together to dance for the children who are not able to dance. The Dance Marathon slogan “For the Kids” serves as a reminder of the organization’s purpose. However, the event includes much more than dancing. Also included in this year’s Dance Marathon were carnival games, face painting, a video game tournament and a silent auction. Several entertainers added to the night’s festivities. There were musical performances by the reigning Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor, Briana Fredrickson, and a trio of Baylor students called the Spicy Boyz. There was also a juggling contortionist, and a few UMHB students volunteered to dress up as Disney princesses and superheroes for the children. At the top of every hour, members of Impact Dance taught the attendees a three part dance to a mashup of songs from “The Greatest Showman.” Children who are currently undergoing treatment at McLane Children’s Hospital in Temple were invited to attend the event and share their stories throughout the night. This year, two nine-year-old girls from the hospital attended the Dance Marathon and represented the children who could not be there. “Dance Marathon was really eye opening,” freshman psychology pre-med major Janeajia Green, who volunteered at the event, said. She said that meeting one of the children from the hospital inspired her. “It was such blessing to be able to make a difference and simply give my time, even if I was not able to give much money. Meeting Ava gave me such an energy boost. I felt like I was meeting my very own superheroes. When I grow up, I want to be just like them, showing people and inspiring them to be more than they can [be],” Green said. Every guest received a hospital bracelet to wear. At the end of the night, two of the children from McLane Children’s Hospital cut the bracelets off of students’ arms. This Dance Marathon tradition is a reminder that attendees are able to take off their bracelets, while these children have to continue wearing theirs as they undergo treatments. At the start of this school year, Heart of Gold set a goal to raise at least $10,000 in donations for McLane Children’s Hospital. This year’s Dance Marathon helped the organization exceed its goal and raise $10,622.28 in total. This money will go toward...

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Heart of Gold hosts dance marathon
Mar20

Heart of Gold hosts dance marathon

UMHB has several organizations that students can get involved with. Heart of Gold is one of these organizations, and it has a unique mission. Members of this group work together with students and members of the community to raise money for McLane Children’s Hospital and Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. Heart of Gold raises most of their money at their annual Dance Marathon, but they also hold several other small events throughout the school year to raise money for these organizations. Senior elementary education major Bria Garner is the co-president of the organization. She gave a brief history of Heart of Gold and how it began. “Heart of Gold was started when a girl named Taylor Helland was diagnosed with cancer her senior year of high school,” she said. “Luckily, she had treatment and was declared cancer-free before she went to school at TCU.” A few years later, Helland’s cancer returned, but she was determined to reach out to other people who were having similar experiences. “She knew that she was not the only one that was going through something like this, and she made it her mission to bring joy to other children who were going through something similar to her,” Garner stated. Helland started Dance Marathon at Texas Christian University, an exciting event created to raise money for children with pediatric illnesses. Unfortunately, she lost her battle to cancer the week before the event. Here at UMHB, a few of her close friends wanted to honor all of her hard work, so they founded Heart of Gold. “All of her friends have now graduated, but Dance Marathon continues to be an event that brings them together either here or at TCU,” Garner said. Dance Marathon is held on college campuses all across the United States to fundraise for local children’s hospitals. On Friday, March 22, Heart of Gold will host their annual Dance Marathon on the third floor of Bawcom Student Union from 5 to 10 p.m. Students and members of the local community are welcome to come and enjoy food, carnival games, dancing, door prizes and trivia alongside young patients from McLane Children’s Hospital. Admittance is only $15, which includes a Dance Marathon T-shirt. If you wish to attend, you can register at www.events.dancemarathon.com or in person at the event. The main purpose of Dance Marathon is to raise money for McLane Children’s Hospital. This year, Heart of Gold has set a fundraising goal of $10,000. Other events held by Heart of Gold have included bake sales, hospital visits and gift-themed fundraisers. Members have also participated in various service projects. This year, they have made blankets for...

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Nursing Student Association hosts chili cook-off
Mar20

Nursing Student Association hosts chili cook-off

UMHB’s Nursing Student Association (NSA) hosted their third annual chili cook-off just in time for the cold front on Monday, March 4. Students and faculty came together for a friendly competition to decide who makes the best chili and the best dessert. The event, which was held in the lobby of the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center, had a successful turnout. Attendees gave five dollars to the NSA as a donation and received a bowl, sample cups and a dessert tray. If the chili they chose left them wanting more, attendees could refill their bowls for three dollars. The purpose of the student vs. faculty chili competition was to raise money for prizes, future events, NSA graduation cords and various other expenses that the organization has. Attendees could choose from vegetarian, beef, chicken, spicy or mild chili, as well as a variety of toppings and desserts. At the end of the line, students and faculty could cast their vote for who should win the awards for best chili and best dessert. The contestant with the most votes would receive a $25 gift card to Chili’s, while the runner-up would receive an Amazon gift card. The winner of the dessert contest would receive a Chick-fil-A gift card. Winners of the cook-off were Rebecca Starkey (who received first place for her white chili) and Cristy Simmons (who won second place for her spicy chili). The winner of the dessert contest was Amy Sanders, who made Reese’s cupcakes. Dr. Amy Mersiovsky, an assistant professor of nursing at UMHB, provided two pies for the events dessert competition and attended the event. “I think it was really good. This is a fun activity that is done every year; it’s a good way for us to have friendly competition between the students and the faculty.” Senior nursing major Brianna Turner attended the cook-off and was very pleased with the results. “It was freaking delicious…I got [chili] number one. It is unique because it had chicken in it instead,” Turner said. To find out more about NSA, visit the Student Organizations section on UMHB’s website and select “Nursing Student Association” from the list of all...

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UMHB’s first Psalm 139 event empowers women through Christ
Feb27

UMHB’s first Psalm 139 event empowers women through Christ

Over 150 women gathered for UMHB’s first Psalm 139 event on Saturday, Jan. 19 in Bawcom Student Union. They enjoyed fellowship and worship together at the conference, which was founded and organized by senior public relations major Sydney Stolz. “The Lord planted this seed in my heart for women’s ministry years ago, but I never would have dreamed it would grow into the Psalm 139 event,” Stolz said. The conference highlighted the message of the psalm, which reads: 13 For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. 14 I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. Psalm 139:13-14 (ESV) Marissa Halvorsen, a sophomore psychology major who attended the event, said that “as women, we think we have to fit the mold of doing everything for everyone and pleasing everybody.” However, Halvorsen said that women already have their identity. “We have to make sure our identity is not found in our peers, parents, significant others, school work, etc.,” she said. “Our identity is in the Lord—He takes the pressure off of needing to please others, we only need to work to please Him.” According to sophomore business major and Psalm 139 committee member Eunice Michaelson, keynote speaker Merritt Johnston’s presentation emphasized the importance of coming to that realization. “She made us laugh, cry, and most importantly realize the truth about our identity in Christ,” Michaelson said. “Merritt Johnston is truly an incredible woman of God.” Johnston is a UMHB graduate who founded SAGE Ministries for girls while she was in college. Now president of the endeavor, she leads a team of volunteer chaplains at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center in Brenham. As she addressed students at the conference, Johnston encouraged them to find their “3:15” moment of realizing freedom, a reference to her time spent on the mission field in Germany where she visited Buchenwald, a former Nazi concentration camp. While there, Johnston was able to see what it was like to be a prisoner inside the walls of the camp and to be able to see the city around the camp – and freedom – right on the other side. She said that when prisoners were declared to be free at 3:15 p.m. on April 11, 1945, the clock stopped permanently, forever a reminder of freedom at that moment. Johnston related the story to everyone’s own personal prisons. “What is your 3:15 moment?” she asked. “What walls are separating you from your total freedom in Christ? When will you declare your freedom?” Sophomore nursing student and member of the Psalm 139 steering committee Amy Luong was deeply encouraged by Johnston’s words of encouragement. “For me, I’ve always been so focused on the future that I don’t realize that once I have Jesus Christ, my life is on track,” Luong...

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