79th Easter Pageant
Apr11

79th Easter Pageant

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The Old Maid and The Thief: An uncomfortable situation that “dominoes”
Apr11

The Old Maid and The Thief: An uncomfortable situation that “dominoes”

UMHB music professors George and Penny Hogan are once again to conduct the theatre’s newest opera, The Lady and the Thief. This is the first opera to be performed in the new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Art Center on Friday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Alumni will also be performing in this year’s show. The Lady and the Thief is a one-act grotesque, radio opera that takes place in 1939. NBC Radio commissioned Gian Carlo Menotti to write this opera for their radio program. Professor George Hogan said there’s a lot to learn from the opera. “This [opera] is situationally grotesque,” George Hogan said. “There’s life lessons you can take away. We’re looking at the human condition in this. It’s basically grotesque hospitality.” Hogan describes the plot of the opera and how situational hospitality plays a part in it. Hogan said that there is an old spinster, Miss Todd, who has a younger maid. There’s also a town gossip named Miss Pinkerton, who comes over one night to talk about the new minister. Hogan said that they’re having tea, there’s a knock at the door and a man who’s drenched from the storm outside. Hogan said the first grotesque hospitality occurs when the two women do what nobody in their right mind would do- invite the strange man into the house. He said the situation dominoes from there with one uncomfortable decision after another. The Hogans are trying something new with this Opera since it was originally on the radio before it was ever performed live. “We’re going to have a foley artist (someone who creates all the sounds on the radio),” George Hogan said. “We’re setting up the pit to be the NBC radio studio… then we’re running two scrims, which is like a veil.” George Hogan said that while the singers are in the pit, the actors will be up on stage. The Hogans said that the actors are supposed to be a part of your imagination as you listen to a radio program. “It’s been really exciting to see this unfold, because it’s a new way to present this,” Penny Hogan said. George Hogan hopes that the opera provides more than just entertainment. “I hope it’s thought-provoking like a sermon would be.” George Hogan says that it’s been different being in the PAC this year instead of at the Cultural Activities Center in Temple. “This has been a learning curve, but there’s been some really wonderful blessings… We’re excited about being in our new building. It’s kind of a freshman year for all of us.” The performances will be tonight...

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Easter Pageant showcases the Gospel to community and globe
Apr11

Easter Pageant showcases the Gospel to community and globe

It came close, but the annual UMHB Easter Pageant has never been stopped by bad weather in all of its 79 year history. This year was no exception after all the rain in the morning and the night before. Though rain storms delayed the first showing by forty-five minutes, prayers were answered as the three performances of the play about Jesus’ life were performed that afternoon under clearing skies, just like the first performance in 1940. Although the noon showing was delayed 45 minutes due to rain storms, there were still three performances that went as planned on the afternoon of March 28, just as it has since 1940. That year, Easter Pageant began providing the surrounding community of UMHB with the extraordinary opportunity to witness the retelling of Jesus’ life. Every year people come together from near and far to acknowledge and celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ as students at the university perform the story based on the ultimate sacrifice. This was the second year that live-streaming of the play was seen by people across the world. Last year’s performance generated around 31,503 viewers, who came from 22 states and six countries, including Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, Ghana, Nigeria and Germany. According to the university’s website, 1,000 streamers watched an entire performance online this year. In addition, 5,000 people attended Easter Pageant on campus. One attendee, Lois Williams of Belton, has lived in the area for eight years. “I think I’ve only missed one year since we’ve moved here,” Williams said. “I just love the story and the commitment of all the students who put it on, and I have three little grandsons who live here who come with us with our kids. I look forward to their response to the Easter story.” Another audience member, Cynthia Tryon, is the advisor for the Association of Black Students on campus and has been coming to Easter Pageant for eleven years. “I look forward to the scene where the tomb is rolled away, and Jesus comes out,” Tryon said. “I love the part where they always invite everyone to come to Jesus, to invite Him to their hearts.” The performances that were livestreamed are up on the website and are still available to be viewed. Alyssa Silva, who works for the media services at the university, helped film Easter Pageant, and said that she learned a lot from the process. “Last year, I was a part of the special make-up team and I was up close and personal with Jesus,” Silva said. “I saw firsthand what was happening behind the scenes and the emotional draining Jesus went through....

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Presidential debate at SGA: Voting opens soon
Feb21

Presidential debate at SGA: Voting opens soon

There is a vote coming up this week for SGA president. If there is one organization on campus that truly encompasses the entire student body, it would be the Student Government Association, (SGA). SGA is the mediator between the student body and administrators. They are the ones who listen to student concerns and voice those concerns to the administration. SGA is also in charge of chartering new organizations. SGA consists of 35 members, including class representatives, student body representatives, and delegates for commuters, military, international and student athletes. SGA has had a big impact on campus. If you have ever received an ‘A’ with a 90.02 percent SGA is to thank for that. A few years ago, the grading scale was skewed so that an ‘A’ was 91-100 percent. SGA became an advocate for students and their GPAs by passing a resolution that changed the grading scale so that a 90-100 percent was considered an ‘A’. SGA was also in charge of raising the amount of printer points from 10 dollars to 15 dollars last year. As well as advocating for more lighting in the Quad and around residential areas to improve student safety. Junior double major in Political Science with an emphasis in Pre-Law and Speech Communication, Tyler Baker, is the current Student Body Vice-President “My favorite part of SGA is being able to serve the student body and be a voice for my peers. I have always wanted to be a part of something bigger than myself and SGA provides a way for me to do that,” Baker said. Student Government Association meetings are held every Tuesday night at 9 p.m. in the Fowler Board Room. Meetings are open to the public, so if you want to see what SGA is advocating for you, feel free to visit one of the meetings. On Monday Feb. 19, SGA held a debate between the two candidates who are running for the student body president. In the meeting, the two candidates, Tyler Baker and Daniel Martinez, answered questions about policies and values they would strive for if they were voted as president. Students will be able to vote for the next student body president starting on Wednesday Feb. 21 through Friday Feb. 23. Students can watch the live stream of the debate from the SGA’s facebook...

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UMHB hosts annual  Writer’s Festival
Feb21

UMHB hosts annual Writer’s Festival

This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.The festival was hosted on Feb. 14-16 in Bawcom Student Union at UMHB. It is named after the journal, The Windhover, which has been around since 1997, according to the journal’s editor and associate professor of the English department, Dr. Nathaniel Hansen. Writer Suzanne M. Wolfe of England, who now resides in Seattle as a Writer in Residence at Seattle Pacific University, was one of the presenters. Wolfe’s writing inventory includes book, essays, and blogs. Wolfe is a well-acclaimed Christian writer. Her fiction novel, Confession of X, was based partially on her travels with her husband. Wolfe’s workshop gave attendees tips and pointers regarding fiction writing. The second presenter was Amy Peterson. Peterson is a writer and an adjunct professor at Taylor University. Peterson’s works have been featured in a wide variety of journals and her book, Dangerous Territory: My Misguided Quest to Save the World. Peterson’s writing can be raw and honest, but it truly encompasses her Christian background.   See Festival, pg. 3          Her workshop specialized in nonfiction. The third presenter was Thom Caraway. Caraway is an associate professor at Whitworrth University. Caraway is also the editor-in-chief for Rock&Sling, a journal of witness. He also founded and publishes of Sage Hill Press. His poems have been featured in a many journals throughout the country and his workshop focused on poetry. His reading was interesting and kept the audience entertained as he read some of his best poems. Still on the Hill was the featured musical duo, which makes do with a wide variety of traditional instruments from the Ozarks, such as the banjo, fiddle and harmonica. Still on the Hill hosted a writing workshop as well as a concert on Thursday night.  The addition of music to the Writers’ Festival was a great touch. Many students enjoyed hearing the band play their unique style of music. A slew of writers from all over the country to serve as panelists. Authors included Elizabeth Dell, Chris...

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Nurses utilize simulation lab at UMHB
Feb21

Nurses utilize simulation lab at UMHB

In order to prepare nursing students for the clinical setting, the Scott and White College of Nursing has implemented three unique components that make up the Clinical Simulation Learning Center. These components include a skills laboratory, a standard clinic, and a simulation hospital. Each component is crucial in helping students to gaining experience and confidence in their skillset in order to grow into a successful professional nurse. The first component is the skills laboratory, which contains mannequins for students to learn, practice and perfect their clinical skills with. These labs are open for students throughout the week, with nursing faculty present to assist with teaching and evaluating students’ technique in clinical skills. “The skills lab is a relaxed setting in which students can really just become better in preforming all sorts of nursing skills,” junior nursing student Clarissa Canchola said. “As student nurses, we are often evaluated in our skillset, which can be very stressful. So it is very helpful to have an easy-going place for us to just practice and ask questions.” The second component is the patient clinic, which emulates a doctor’s office. The purpose for this clinic is for students to be evaluated in a more formal way, with faculty and other students who act as patients. The student nurse is then able to perform a wide variety of skills, including basic skills such as vital signs and a full health assessment, along with medication administration. “The environment of the practicums that take places in the clinic area make it seem like we are actually working as nurses in a health care setting,” sophomore nursing student Bennett Cardoso said. “We have to verbalize everything to our instructors, which will help us when we are at the hospital to explain the procedures step by step to our patients to help them feel more comfortable. Knowing these practicums are an essential part of our grade, we have to practice and make it perfect. This will help us in the future to use our assessment skills in real life. Practice definitely makes perfect.” Finally, the third component, which is the most advanced and realistic educational tool, is the simulation hospital. Each semester, students in each level of the nursing program have the opportunity to apply their skills to a life-like situation. These simulations each have a different concept that they cover and the nursing students work together in groups to provide care to mannequin patients. However, these mannequins are unique in that they can be controlled by the nursing faculty to do different things. The students must figure out how to deal with a wide array of situations, which...

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