Spanish Club celebrates Dia de la Raza
Nov06

Spanish Club celebrates Dia de la Raza

Colorful paper decorations hung from the ceiling. A festive photo booth sat outside the CAB office and lively cultural music played as the Spanish club celebrated Dia de la Raza in Mabee Student Center. “Spanish Club is just a group of people that are excited about Spanish and its culture, and are ready to celebrate it together,” senior Spanish major and president of the Spanish club, Kaitlyn Roberts, said of the Oct. 26 event. “We do activities together that are fun, and we get to learn more about the culture.” Dia de la Raza, also known as El Encuentro, is translated as the “Day of the Root” or “The Finding.” People in the Latin American and Hispanic culture honor Christopher Columbus’ discovery as an event that caused people of different races to interact and develop new relationships. “We make a party,” freshman psychology major Josseline Reyes said. “It’s something happy for us, even though the situation was sad.” In the United States, Columbus Day commemorates the travels of the Italian explorer and his discovery of the New World. While Columbus’ excursions brought disease, destruction and death to the land, members of the Latin American culture still celebrate the positive influences of the 15th century exploration. “It was kind of a discovery of a whole bunch of races and mixtures because there were so many people intertwining,” senior psychology major Kyoko Clark said. “It’s interesting to see ultimately now where we’re at—all the different cultures, and how so many people are mixed with different backgrounds.” To give other students the opportunity of participating in the Operation Christmas Child fundraiser led by the Spanish Club, toys and monetary donations were accepted in exchange for entry tickets to the party in the SUB. “That’s the key to it; we’re trying to get people motivated to give,” Roberts said. “In November, we’re going to be packing boxes and giving them to Operation Christmas Child.” The event served as a way for the public to be included in the activities of the Spanish Club and learn about an important holiday for the Latin American community. “Culture is so rich,” Roberts said. “This day is probably one of our biggest events throughout the year just because it’s incorporating people not in the club.” Organization members provided a variety of cuisines from different Spanish-speaking countries. Dancing instructors from In the Mood Ballroom and Dance Studio, located in Temple, taught guests salsa, merengue and other Latin-inspired dance moves. A Day of the Dead memorial displayed pictures of American pop star Selena surrounded by decorative skulls and flowers. “So many people don’t want to speak Spanish or embrace...

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Who wants to be a millionaire? Virtual game creates real results
Nov06

Who wants to be a millionaire? Virtual game creates real results

What’s the best way to invest $1 million? Students are getting the opportunity to find out through the second installment of The Dr. Stock Market Game. The game is named after the interim dean of the McLane College of Business, Dr. Paul Stock. Junior economics major John Martin has taken on the challenge of the game. “I probably spend an hour a day working on it,” Martin said. “I mean I’m checking it throughout the day. I have the app on my phone as well, so even between classes I’m checking it.” The game is hosted through a web site used by professional investors to simulate the way the stock market works and to test their investment strategies. Participants enter the game on a two-person team and this year 38 teams signed up. Last year, the game was limited to students in the College of Business. This year, faculty members were also invited to compete although they are not be eligible for the prize money. Players began investing their virtual million Oct. 14. The promise of a cash prize has attracted some dedicated participants. “I wanted to do it anyway just because it’s fun,” Martin said. “It was going to be cool to compete against a lot of my friends. But I probably wouldn’t be spending as much time on it as I am if there wasn’t some kind of prize at the end because that adds a little bit of motivation.” While the money that students invest may be simulation, the prize they could possibly receive is real cash. The third-place team will earn $100; second place obtains $200 and first place will win a total of $500. The competition has encouraged Martin to spend  time researching what is going on in the market and looking at what some professionals are predicting. “I try to look at the Wall Street Journal every day and read it and also watch the news for a little bit and just see what happened that day…” he said. “Even war stuff in other countries affects maybe the oil or gold exploration in those countries….” Professor of management Larry Locke is one of the sponsors of the event. He is glad that the game was open to the entire university this year because it can give a taste of what real stock market investing is like. “How many people the age of our students have that kind of real world experience investing in the stock market?” Locke said. “So to give them the ability on this professional platform to be able to do something that very realistically simulates investing in the stock market,...

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Stadium brings energy to flag football
Nov06

Stadium brings energy to flag football

Crusader Stadium has already proved itself to be a great venue to watch football, but many students didn’t ever think they would have the opportunity to play under the lights at the new facility. However, the intramural flag football championship games were moved from their normal location at the recreational fields to the stadium. “Playing intramurals in the new stadium was awesome. It’s great that they’re finding ways for the whole university to enjoy it. The campus rec staff went all out by introducing the team members, having the national anthem, giving stuff away for free and using the scoreboard during our games,” senior business major Adam Rea said. The idea for moving the championship games to a bigger field where more people could enjoy the games has been on the Student Government Association’s agenda for a number of years. “I think Jonathan Kendall with SGA and Campus Rec tried this in years past with intramural basketball championships being held in the arena. It was never an option for flag football before now,” Director of Campus Recreation Sue Weaver said. The overall atmosphere of the championship games was  one that is usually not felt with intramural games. Playing on such a  stage gave the players a feel of what it would be like to compete in a big game at Crusader Stadium. “The event was absolutely a success. It was a great opportunity for those participating in the games to be recognized and to play in such a great facility. Fans and parents came to watch, and our Campus Rec staff, SGA, and other organizations were recognized,” Weaver said. The hype that was brought to the night gave the team competing and the fans that were there a lot to look forward to. “It was very cool to get to play in Crusader Stadium,” senior business major Tyson Brower said. “We have been playing together all year as a team … and we all really enjoyed the championship games. It gave a different feel to intramurals.” The games were  full of   both big plays and excitement, but the coed championship had the teams and fans biting their fingernails till the last second ran off the jumbotron. “Unfortunately, our coed team came up short, but we had a great time playing together all season, and I made a lot of new friends through intramurals,” Brower said. That One Team was the squad that secured the victory for the coed side of things, while the Dream Killers won the men’s division.  Both teams were awarded T-shirts as well as bragging rights until next year. “Winning intramurals is all about getting the...

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