Student leaders look ahead,  seek guidance for future
Feb04

Student leaders look ahead, seek guidance for future

The weekend before last, students packed luggage into a trailer and filled several university vans and embarked on a three-and-a-half-hour journey to Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene. Hardin-Simmons was this year’s host school for the annual Christian Association of Student Leaders conference. UMHB attendees represented almost every organization on campus including the likes of Student Government Association, Baptist Student Ministries, Campus Activities Board Welcome Week Steering Committee and Residence Life Association.   Junior psychology major Ross Jones went to the convention with members of First Year Council, also known as FYC. This was his third time to participate.   “My favorite part of CASL is getting to connect with students from other universities and sharing ideas. This year in particular really helped me step into the shoes of a first-year student and take into mind the stress level that they are experiencing and how to work with that not to overwhelm them more,” he said.   Not only did he meet and learn from students at other universities, but the experience made him grateful and gave him a new respect for his own school.   Overall, something I always end up taking away from CASL is perspective and the realization that we are truly blessed here at UMHB in a variety of ways and a lot of the time we tend to take it for granted.   Senior international business major and Student Body President Jonathan Kendall was among the representatives from SGA.   One lesson he took away from the event was how “to better prepare senators for SGA and to communicate the work that is happening within SGA.”   Maegan Loya, a senior education major and executive member of Campus Activities Board, enjoyed herself, but was sad this would be her last year to attend. What made this year special for her was being asked to make a presentation to all of the universities’ Campus Activities Boards about events she and her team have helped plan and execute at UMHB.   “It was great because it’s something I know, love and could talk about with ease. After submitting my presentation among every other school, I was honored to be one of two selected to present at CASL for Student Activities,” she said.   Another highlight of the event for Loya was the second night, which featured a concert by Christian songwriter and recording artist Jimmy Needham.   She said, “I absolutely loved it! I had never seen him live … which made me even more excited to see...

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Offering hope through textiles
Feb04

Offering hope through textiles

Over 3,000 miles away, hundreds of women and their families’ lives are being transformed through the operations of tiny warehouse number seven located in the UMHB Williams Service Center.   The works of Threads of Hope, a nonprofit organization that aids artisans in Peru by purchasing textiles and shipping them to churches and organizations around the country for them to sell.   “The university invited us with the belief that it would be beneficial for students by providing them with academic as well as service opportunities,” Jennifer Kellner, Threads of Hope center manager, said.   Since the foundation of Threads of Hope in 1999, the organization has strived to meet the needs of these family breadwinners by, “empowering impoverished women, [and] transforming lives.”   Originally based out of Plano, under the leadership of Cinde Rawn, Threads of Hope director, the small operation moved its warehouse to the campus just last February as part of a rare partnership that provides opportunity to its students, as well as assistance a people group in need.   “The organization’s collaboration with UMHB is unique,” Dr. Christie Bledsoe, chair of the Threads of Hope advisory board, said. “We are providing a space for the business operations.”   This “incubator idea” as one might call it, includes taking in an organization and giving it the room it needs to grow.   During the first year in action, the advisory council pushed to establish a functioning operational system, the “focus for 2015 will be marketing and publicizing the Threads of Hope partnership with UMHB on campus, in the community and among other universities,” Kellner said.   The partnership came about when a few members of the Threads of Hope board came to speak during the campus’ annual Missions Emphasis Week, just a few years prior.   “They were warmly received and their message resonated with the students,” Dr. David Bonner, advisory council member, said. “This led to student internships and projects, as well as two international studies trip,” which included both an MBA and undergraduate class.   As the relationship between the university and Threads of Hope continued to grow, the organization addressed Dr. Bonner with its needs, one of which included a place where passionate, servant minded students could help improve the operations of the nonprofit for further growth.   “(With) creativity on both of their parts, it culminated with Threads of Hope coming on campus to occupy space in the Williams Service Center,” Dr. Bonner said.   Since the warehouse has moved to the university campus, the organization has seen exceptional growth, as textile sales rocket to 44 percent.   With established contacts in...

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Artist gives sight to listeners
Jan22

Artist gives sight to listeners

 The Baugh Center for the Visual Arts is hosting works of art from graphic designer Carlos Hernandez.   On Thursday, Jan. 15, Hernandez came to talk to students about his displayed art and how he came into the profession he is in now.   He began the evening with a story about what influenced him to pursue the field of graphic design.   When Hernandez was 7, he found an album at the grocery store.   He held up the album.   “I see this album and I just think this is a cool band. I don’t know who they are, I don’t know anything about it, but I know I like the album cover… and because I liked the cover, I bought the album and brought it home,” Hernandez said.   After taking it home and showing his mom, his mom explained to him that the cover was an illustration that someone was paid to create for the band.   He was so amazed by the artwork and the fact that people did that for a living that he decided he wanted to do that as well.   Hernandez grew up in Lubbock. He now resides in Houston after graduating from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s in graphic design and illustration.   He credits much of his success to living in a small town and not being exposed to as much growing up because it made him want to see more of the world.   Now, his work has been featured in several different publications and he has also designed gig posters for many artists that include Kings of Leon, The Kills, Santana and more. He also designed the poster art for the 2013 Austin City Limits Music Festival.   He is a founding partner of Burning Bones Press, a printmaking studio.   During the gallery talk, he mentioned the process of screen printing, a form of graphic design that Hernandez frequently uses.   “During the… Great Depression… the United States got involved with art. That’s the only time in history the government got involved with art and paid artists to do art. It was called the… Works Progress Administration.”   The WPA put people back to work by training artists and amateurs to create poster art for the government.   The show that is featured in Baugh is primarily gig posters made the same way that the WPA made their posters when they trained men and women.   “Some of the posters are… out there,” Hernandez said about his work and some examples of other students’ works.   He did a lot of monochronmatic jobs in...

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Men’s win count spikes before tourney
Nov25

Men’s win count spikes before tourney

  UMHB is a powerhouse when it comes to sports, and the new men’s volleyball team is looking to be nothing less when the season officially starts in the spring.   Although the team just officially began tournament play this year, they have already recruited 17 players that range from freshmen to seniors.   Junior business management major Aaron Jackson was appointed captain of the team.   “It has always been a great passion of mine and I’ve always wanted to play volleyball as a collegiate sport …” Jackson said. “Once I found out there was a big passion for volleyball here at UMHB as far as guys, I felt like we definitely needed to get something started here.”   As captain, Jackson says his job is to motivate his team, make sure they show up to practice, hold them accountable and make sure they take initiative to do what is expected.   Since Texas does not have NCAA men’s volleyball, the Southern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association was created, thus letting this group of guys start something new on campus.   The men have been travelling to different schools this semester to participate in tournaments before their season starts in Jan.   Nursing major and assistant coach Elleny Ohendalski says the guys have greatly improved since the beginning of the semester.   “They’re playing good at the tournaments … they just seem shy on the court … but they are improving,” she said.   The team is preparing to host their own tournament in December, inviting other schools in the division to Crusader turf for some matches. Fans are encouraged to come out and see the guys play.   The group practices at 5:30 a.m., where they learn how to set, serve, rotate, do drills and communicate on the court.   Though this is a new thing at UMHB, Jackson says he can really see the passion and growth in his teammates.   Along with improving their skills, the guys have found friendships in each other, learning how to connect and play as a team both on and off the court.   “As a captain, it is my job to oversee the team under the coach … I try to keep my boys motivated because they’re my teammates … I care more about my team than myself … because without them, I am nothing,” Jackson said. “It takes a team to do everything on the court and I can’t beat six other guys by myself.”   The first ever Crusader Classic will kick off Dec. 6 in...

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Independence Village rolls out red carpet
Nov25

Independence Village rolls out red carpet

Lights. Camera. Action. There were men in tuxedos, women in dresses and even a red carpet at the first ever Independence Village Video Awards. A variety of free candy, drinks and an endless supply of popcorn filled the McLane Great Hall in Bawcom in preparation for the entertaining videos.   Nov. 13, the I.V.V. Awards show began at 7 p.m., emceed by Independence Village RA’s Nathan Forester and Lindsay Harrell.   Forester enjoyed being a part of the unique night.   “My favorite part about being an emcee was the great opportunity to showcase the hard work of the many talented individuals of UMHB,” he said.   The show kicked off with previews for upcoming feature films such as Avengers: Age of Ulton, Exodus: Gods and Kings, Mockingjay and more. Viewers were also treated to a brief video highlighting some of the projects of the I.V.V. Awards sponsor group, Astra Club.   Astra is a do-it-all student organization. They’ve done anything and everything from picking up trash around Lake Belton to serving food at a soup kitchen. They’re involvement earned them the UMHB student organizations Community Service Award. At the event, they had a table set up where they were accepting donations.   Next, attendees were able to watch all 10 videos that had been submitted for the contest. The subject matter in the videos ranged from a comedic look at the life of a nursing major, to interviews with the “twelve disciples,” to even the bathroom habits of sloths.   After all the videos were shown, there was a brief intermission. During this time, students were able to vote on which video was their favorite. This vote eventually decided who won the top prize. The judges, RD’s Chris Green, Colleen Mitchel and Traci Squarcette, were responsible for selecting the various other awards.   The best actress award went to Rachel Lewis for her role as sloth expert in Sloth Potty Training. She delivered absurdly funny lines about sloths’ bathroom habits with a seriousness which was surely hard to maintain with Leah White (best supporting actress) next to her, pretending to be a sloth.   The best actor award went to Alex Lanoux for his serious portrayal of a man who lost an election in Black Infinity. This video also won the most dramatic award and the drama began and ended with Lanoux’s superb work at inhabiting his character.   The best director award went to Justin Minchew for Black Infinity. This video clearly had the most professional look to it, which probably had a lot to do with the directing.   Minchew and his friends created the movie...

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Week highlights foriegn missions, brings visitors to campus
Nov07

Week highlights foriegn missions, brings visitors to campus

Missions Emphasis Week is one of the busiest weeks on campus, bringing people from all over the world together. The event is also one of the most popular traditions since it began in 1999 with Dr. George Loutherback.   It has grown exponentially in recent years, bringing missionaries from around the world to come speak to classes, chapel and scattered gatherings throughout the week.   “We do missions emphasis week because we believe you can touch the world from here,” Director of Baptist Student Ministries Dr. Shawn Shannon said. “It helps raise awareness of global issues and opportunities and creates ways to make connections with those with specific people and agencies.”   A steering committee of 43 students have been planning this year’s MEW for nearly a year. A lot of organization goes into preparing for the week-long event.   The students split up into groups that work on different things that involve interviewing, hospitality, public relations, prayer, seminars and special events.   “We want to engage the whole campus. We are engaging students, but also, we have missionaries in up to 90 classes now, and they’re there to communicate with anyone in the classroom. We had a luncheon for faculty and staff. There were more than 120 people there,” Shannon said.   Of course, with all the thought that goes into getting missionaries to come speak, there is a lot of planning into what else is going on during the week.   There were different places on campus where students could go listen to the missionaries, but there were also more hands-on occasions. This included having coffee with international missionaries, a special speaker at Wednesday night Focus and a recently added activity, the global runway.   It was first done two years ago, and was held again because it was such a hit with students.   Music and fun filled Brindley as people walked up and down the stairs and across the stage to show off a different cultures traditional clothing.   Student involvement is a big part of what makes MEW happen every year.   Senior nursing major Allison Toy has chosen her last year to be a part of the week. She served on the faculty relations sub-committee.   “We have a list of missionaries and their bios and what they’ve done and we connect them with faculty members. A faculty might request a missionary who has a business background or a specific missionary, and we pair them up,” Toy said.   She also said that being involved in the committee instead of just participating in MEW has been a great experience because she gets to...

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