Midnight March
Apr24

Midnight March

Each year, UMHB seniors gather on a Friday night at the end of the spring semester for Midnight March. This year’s ceremony was held at midnight on Saturday, April 13. Students gathered near the Sesquicentennial Plaza in the Quad on Friday night in preparation for the seniors to arrive. During the week before Midnight March, members of the senior class decorate candles and distribute them to students and faculty who have impacted them in a positive manner during their time at UMHB. In addition, each senior chooses a member of the junior class to robe during the ceremony. At the event, students stand in a circle with their candles, and the seniors come around and light them. After all the candles are lit, the seniors robe the junior class. This gesture symbolizes the transition to the next group of seniors. After the juniors have been robed, the graduating class and the juniors usually sing the senior song, “Up with the Purple.” However, they did something different this year. Instead of singing the traditional song, all of the students participated in the Cru Spirit Dance, which is a fan favorite at football games and other school events. Senior Kelly Taylor, who is a double major in psychology and criminal justice, thinks that this change was a good one. “While ‘Up with the Purple’ is the senior song and it’s tradition to sing it, I feel that the Cru Spirit Dance was more fitting for this occasion because Midnight March is all about reflecting back on your time at UMHB, while ‘Up with the Purple’ looks more towards the future,” she said.“One of my first memories here is during Welcome Week at Spirit and Traditions, when the Cru Spirit Dance was played over and over and over again. It was nice to reflect back on that memory during this tradition.” After Midnight March ends, members of the graduating class can ring the Senior Bell. The bell is located near the Parker House, which contains the Musick Alumni Center and Museum. This year, free popcorn was available for students, and seniors were able to take home a commemorative cup. Bonnie Moriarty, a senior English education major, enjoyed being able to participate in Midnight March. “My favorite experience with Midnight March was how everything stayed centered on celebrating friendships at UMHB,” she said. “It was meaningful to light candles of underclassmen who impacted our time here.” Moriarty robed Chloe Poe, a sophomore education major. “I am so blessed to have a friend like Bonnie,” she said. “I hope I am as good[of]a dorm Resident Assistant as her. I can’t wait for when I...

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League Cru hosts Play Night
Apr24

League Cru hosts Play Night

League Cru has had yet another successful year with their annual Play Night. The night before UMHB’s annual Play Day, the organization typically hosts a game night in Bawcom Student Union that features video games, board games and food. League Cru is about leisurely and competitive gaming with one another, and their mission is to promote the rise of esports, a form of organized multiplayer video game competition. “The League Cru and Cru Engineering have mutual members between each organization, and a lot of our members were coming to participate in the activities tonight, so Ifigured it would be greatto come and have fun with our members or just to help out,” said sophomore Isaac Newton, President of Cru Engineering. The night kicked off with an icebreaker scavenger hunt between new- comers and frequent participants. In order to win the game, a person had to find others that matched the description on a card. Next came a computer gaming competition. “I enjoy the competitive gaming in general; it’s fun to just come to a place and compete against people that are interested in the same things as you,” said Martinus Counts, a psychology major. League Cru’s Play Night featured a friendly atmosphere that welcomed all types of students who have a passion for gaming with...

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“The Music Man” performed at new PAC
Apr24

“The Music Man” performed at new PAC

UMHB proudly performed its musical of the year with Meredith Willson’s “The Music Man” in the Sue and Frank Mayborn Performing Arts center (PAC) on April 12-14. While other events, such as plays, orchestra ensembles and guest performances, have occurred in the PAC since its opening last year, “The Music Man”was the first Broadway musical to be performed in the center. Many people were involved with the making of this musical. The entire cast sang, danced and acted as though they were the actual residents of River City, Iowa, where the musical takes place. The cast featured many UMHB students as well as faculty, recent alumni and community members. Many of the extras and child roleswere filled by community members who take lessons at the UMHB Music Conservatory. Auditions were held in late November 2018, and students who received roles enrolled in the Opera/Musical Theatre class for the spring semester. Producer Dr. Jonathan Gary knew that there were a lot of non-music majors who had experience and love for theater in high school who would be interested in auditioning, and he encouraged them to participate. As a result, many students from other departments on campus joined the cast and crew. Faculty members such as UMHB’s Provost John Vassar and Alumni Relations Secretary Shelly Claybrook also played small parts in the musical. Art professor Hershall Seals and the Painting I class helped create the backdrops. UMHB brought in Natasha Tolleson, who is the head of Temple High School’s theater arts department, to be Artistic Director for the production. Tolleson had won many awards and directed her fair share of musicals before working with UMHB on “The Music Man.” “It was a large staff that put all of this together under Natisha Tolleson’s artistic direction and Dr. Gary’s producing,” Lisa Clement, UMHB voice professor and the musical’s Music Director, said. Even the new student body president, Sarah Fox, participated in the musical as Mrs. Squires. “It was such a blessing to be involved with the very beginning of a new start here with theater at UMHB,” Fox said. “I am so grateful for everyone who spent so many hours creating something incredible for the campus and the community. I’m so excited to see the future of this program.” The show itself was spectacular. Set designer Erik Vose and his building team did a great job making the movable and interactive sets. Not only were the sets well-designed, but the crew did a great job seamlessly transitioning between at least six different sets. The backdrops and props were cleverly made and vibrant that every detail stood out on stage. The cast did...

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UMHB holds 80th annual Easter Pageant
Apr24

UMHB holds 80th annual Easter Pageant

Three wooden crosses lay on the grass by Luther Memorial in preparation for UMHB’s eightieth annual Easter Pageant on Wednesday, April 17. Though the event faced a 10 minute rain delay prior to the 12:30 show, this year’s production was otherwise another success and provided an opportunity for students to minister to members of the community. Junior engineering major Daniel Roberson served as an assistant director for this year’s Easter Pageant. “It really is an honor to be able to not only participate in, but to help direct Easter Pageant this year,” he said. “It is one of the most unique traditions that we have, and I am certain that it is something I will one day tell my children about.” The tradition of the Easter Pageant began in 1940 when UMHB President Gordon Singleton had an idea to use the ruins of Luther Hall to portray the story of Christ. The event gives students the opportunity to tell the story of the Resurrection and to share the story with the community. Students are encouraged to participate in this event, which also features children and grandchildren of UMHB students and staff. The university president selects students to portray Jesus and Mary for the production, which is student-led and directed. This year, Easter Pageant was directed by senior nursing major Katie Aday. Senior social work major Joey Mainini portrayed Christ and senior music education major Savannah Sepulveda portrayed Mary. The event also featured live music performed by UMHB’s One Voice, which consists of Sarah Ash, Kelli Chaka, James Jones, Hannah Killough, Tyler Medelin, Caleb Morrow, Ruben Ortega, Jancarlo Rodrigues, Douglas Stephen, Angel Tolbert, Katelyn White and Cydney Wilkerson. The songs featured were “In the Name of the Lord,” sung by Wilkerson; “Via Dolorosa,” sung by Sepulveda; “O Praise the Name,” sung by Frederickson; “Joy and Sorrow,” sung by Ray Martin. The performance also featured group renditions of “He is Jehovah” and “Any Other Way.” “Easter Pageant is my favorite tradition at UMHB and holds some of my most cherished memories,” said junior nursing major Emma Spellings, who was an assistant director for this year’s Easter Pageant. “I was honored to play a role in orchestrating something that so clearly speaks the Gospel.” Spellings encourages students who have not previously been involved in Easter Pageant to join the tradition in the future. “I would absolutely encourage anyone and everyone to get involved in Easter Pageant,” she said. “One misconception about Easter Pageant is that you have to have theater background or be a perfect Christian. Neither of those things are true. Easter Pageant is for everyone and offers authentic community and...

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Cultures displayed at UMHB festival
Apr02

Cultures displayed at UMHB festival

The Multicultural Festival is an annual event that is put together to celebrate the diverse cultures that are on UMHB’s campus. This year’s event was held on Wednesday, March 20 on the third floor of Bawcom Student Union. Many different events took place at the event to feature and appreciate culture. Some of the events included a Tai Chi demonstration, praise dance, Mandarin poem readings, henna tattoos and traditional Japanese tea ceremonies. The first event of the night was a Tai Chi demonstration to relax. However, he changed directions when he stated that it could also be used for self- defense. The demonstration was interactive, as he got students to participate, and it was very informative. Another interesting event that took place during the night was a praise dance demonstration that was put on by junior nursing major Skaiye Finney. She did an outstanding job at incorporating worship into this event. Her dance was very interpretive and she also incorporated sign language. Before she began, she shared a quick PowerPoint about the background of praise and worship dancing. Her showcase was also very interactive, as she got the audience to sign with her as she danced. Spanish students and professors took time to read poems in Spanish with the audience. Dr. Madison, professor of UMHB’s Spanish I and II classes, was not planning on reading a poem, but she was asked to read a poem for the audience in place of a student that could not make it. She read a poem titled “Bala- da de los abuelos” by Nicolas Guillen. The poem was about an Afro-Cuban man that had to deal with two different kinds of racism while in Cuba. It was a very moving piece and was well-recited by Dr. Madison. Several cultures were on display, and the people that attended the event were able to learn about cultures with which they were unfamiliar. Many people came to partake in this showcase of cultures and left with a better understanding and appreciation of them. This is an event you do not want to miss when it comes around next...

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Students honor Month of the Military Child
Apr02

Students honor Month of the Military Child

The month of April is known for numerous holidays such as Easter, April Fools’ Day and Earth Day. However, what many people don’t know is that April is also the Month of the Military Child. This is a special time of the year dedicated to honoring the children of military parents all over the world. UMHB takes great pride in recognizing students who fall into that category. There are approximately two million military children all over the U.S., ranging from newborns all the way up to 18-year-olds (sheerid). Their lives seem to be no easy task, as many of them endure lots of challenges such as anxiety, separation and relocation. “One of the most challenging things about being a military kid is moving around,” said Micki Hutchins, a freshman social work major. “I learned to only make surface-level friends because moving away from a best friend after two to three years over and over again became too painful. However, I have a great relationship with my immediate family because of this.” Many organizations around the world take advantage of the month and hold events to honor those who are children of military parents. The Department of Defense Education Activity and The Department of Defense team work together to encourage schools to plan events dedicated to the Month of the Military Child. Operation Megaphone is a worldwide event dedicated to connecting military teens around the world and helping them discuss everyday issues that they face. Many group seven hold specific days for  people to wear purple in an effort to show their support. A lot of organizations also hold events such as contests and festivals. Senior filmstudies major Viranda Brooks described events that she has participated in. “When I was younger and lived on a base in Germany, they had a big carnival with free prizes and food,” she said. “It was a lot of fun.” While their parents are deployed in other parts of the country, many dependents have to find ways to cope with the fact that their parents are gone. Some children do not understand why their parents have to leave for such long periods of time, and this can make them angry. Being able to communicate is one of the most important ways children of military parents can deal with their parents’ absence. Writing letters is one of the main ways they communicate, as many people in the military do not have access to cell phones or other communication devices. It is also important for people of authority such as teachers, counselors and non-military parents to be as helpful and supportive as possible. “I would always go to my mom and see...

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