Presidential debate at SGA: Voting opens soon
Feb21

Presidential debate at SGA: Voting opens soon

There is a vote coming up this week for SGA president. If there is one organization on campus that truly encompasses the entire student body, it would be the Student Government Association, (SGA). SGA is the mediator between the student body and administrators. They are the ones who listen to student concerns and voice those concerns to the administration. SGA is also in charge of chartering new organizations. SGA consists of 35 members, including class representatives, student body representatives, and delegates for commuters, military, international and student athletes. SGA has had a big impact on campus. If you have ever received an ‘A’ with a 90.02 percent SGA is to thank for that. A few years ago, the grading scale was skewed so that an ‘A’ was 91-100 percent. SGA became an advocate for students and their GPAs by passing a resolution that changed the grading scale so that a 90-100 percent was considered an ‘A’. SGA was also in charge of raising the amount of printer points from 10 dollars to 15 dollars last year. As well as advocating for more lighting in the Quad and around residential areas to improve student safety. Junior double major in Political Science with an emphasis in Pre-Law and Speech Communication, Tyler Baker, is the current Student Body Vice-President “My favorite part of SGA is being able to serve the student body and be a voice for my peers. I have always wanted to be a part of something bigger than myself and SGA provides a way for me to do that,” Baker said. Student Government Association meetings are held every Tuesday night at 9 p.m. in the Fowler Board Room. Meetings are open to the public, so if you want to see what SGA is advocating for you, feel free to visit one of the meetings. On Monday Feb. 19, SGA held a debate between the two candidates who are running for the student body president. In the meeting, the two candidates, Tyler Baker and Daniel Martinez, answered questions about policies and values they would strive for if they were voted as president. Students will be able to vote for the next student body president starting on Wednesday Feb. 21 through Friday Feb. 23. Students can watch the live stream of the debate from the SGA’s facebook...

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UMHB hosts annual  Writer’s Festival
Feb21

UMHB hosts annual Writer’s Festival

This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.The festival was hosted on Feb. 14-16 in Bawcom Student Union at UMHB. It is named after the journal, The Windhover, which has been around since 1997, according to the journal’s editor and associate professor of the English department, Dr. Nathaniel Hansen. Writer Suzanne M. Wolfe of England, who now resides in Seattle as a Writer in Residence at Seattle Pacific University, was one of the presenters. Wolfe’s writing inventory includes book, essays, and blogs. Wolfe is a well-acclaimed Christian writer. Her fiction novel, Confession of X, was based partially on her travels with her husband. Wolfe’s workshop gave attendees tips and pointers regarding fiction writing. The second presenter was Amy Peterson. Peterson is a writer and an adjunct professor at Taylor University. Peterson’s works have been featured in a wide variety of journals and her book, Dangerous Territory: My Misguided Quest to Save the World. Peterson’s writing can be raw and honest, but it truly encompasses her Christian background.   See Festival, pg. 3          Her workshop specialized in nonfiction. The third presenter was Thom Caraway. Caraway is an associate professor at Whitworrth University. Caraway is also the editor-in-chief for Rock&Sling, a journal of witness. He also founded and publishes of Sage Hill Press. His poems have been featured in a many journals throughout the country and his workshop focused on poetry. His reading was interesting and kept the audience entertained as he read some of his best poems. Still on the Hill was the featured musical duo, which makes do with a wide variety of traditional instruments from the Ozarks, such as the banjo, fiddle and harmonica. Still on the Hill hosted a writing workshop as well as a concert on Thursday night.  The addition of music to the Writers’ Festival was a great touch. Many students enjoyed hearing the band play their unique style of music. A slew of writers from all over the country to serve as panelists. Authors included Elizabeth Dell, Chris...

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Nurses utilize simulation lab at UMHB
Feb21

Nurses utilize simulation lab at UMHB

In order to prepare nursing students for the clinical setting, the Scott and White College of Nursing has implemented three unique components that make up the Clinical Simulation Learning Center. These components include a skills laboratory, a standard clinic, and a simulation hospital. Each component is crucial in helping students to gaining experience and confidence in their skillset in order to grow into a successful professional nurse. The first component is the skills laboratory, which contains mannequins for students to learn, practice and perfect their clinical skills with. These labs are open for students throughout the week, with nursing faculty present to assist with teaching and evaluating students’ technique in clinical skills. “The skills lab is a relaxed setting in which students can really just become better in preforming all sorts of nursing skills,” junior nursing student Clarissa Canchola said. “As student nurses, we are often evaluated in our skillset, which can be very stressful. So it is very helpful to have an easy-going place for us to just practice and ask questions.” The second component is the patient clinic, which emulates a doctor’s office. The purpose for this clinic is for students to be evaluated in a more formal way, with faculty and other students who act as patients. The student nurse is then able to perform a wide variety of skills, including basic skills such as vital signs and a full health assessment, along with medication administration. “The environment of the practicums that take places in the clinic area make it seem like we are actually working as nurses in a health care setting,” sophomore nursing student Bennett Cardoso said. “We have to verbalize everything to our instructors, which will help us when we are at the hospital to explain the procedures step by step to our patients to help them feel more comfortable. Knowing these practicums are an essential part of our grade, we have to practice and make it perfect. This will help us in the future to use our assessment skills in real life. Practice definitely makes perfect.” Finally, the third component, which is the most advanced and realistic educational tool, is the simulation hospital. Each semester, students in each level of the nursing program have the opportunity to apply their skills to a life-like situation. These simulations each have a different concept that they cover and the nursing students work together in groups to provide care to mannequin patients. However, these mannequins are unique in that they can be controlled by the nursing faculty to do different things. The students must figure out how to deal with a wide array of situations, which...

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Cheerleaders compete in national contest
Jan24

Cheerleaders compete in national contest

The Crusader cheerleading team has returned from their competition in Orlando, Florida from January 12-18 to support our basketball and sports teams for the rest of this year. The cheer team came away with 8th place, out of fourteen other contestants in their division. While the team has previously gone to the National Cheerleading Association (NCA) competitions, this is the first year the team has gome to the Universal Cheerleaders Association (UCA) Nationals competition in Orlando, Florida. This is also the first year they went to nationals with new head coach Amanda Wrinkler. This will be the fourth year the cheerleading team has gone to nationals since the team ended their fifteen-year hiatus in 2014. The team took a break from competing last year due to a change in coaches. The team is composed of 19 students, all of which competed in Orlando. The routine was choreographed by Wrinkler and a friend from Oklahoma who teaches varsity cheer. First, they made the skeleton of the routine based on the score sheet and then added on from there after watching the girls’ skillsets throughout the year. Prior to heading to Orlando, the Cru cheerleading team held a showcase event at the Mayborn Campus Center on Thursday, January 11, to show students, faculty and family members the routine they would perform in Orlando. Wrinkler said she decided to hold the showcase because she wanted to give them a chance to be in front of their peers and their community before they arrived because they wouldn’t get much support in person while there. Wrinkler said that a few parents would be going to Florida, but not many had the chance to and this event would provide an opportunity for families who can’t go. “It has turned out to be a really cool opportunity for everyone to see the routine before we go,” Wrinkler said on the night of the showcase. Sidney Locke is a freshman vocal performance major who attended the performance. “I thought the routine was great,” Locke said. “You could tell the practice… really paid off because they did a good job.” Another student who attended the showcase was graduate exercise phycology major Justis Kelly. “I thought routine was good and you could tell how hard they worked and how hard they were practicing.” Kelly said. Though they did not win championship, they are champions in the hearts of the UMHB...

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PAC almost finished: Faculty prepares for art performances
Aug23

PAC almost finished: Faculty prepares for art performances

In the spring semester of 2017, ground was broken to make way for a new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center on campus. Now, construction on the building is close to being finished and performances are being planned. The building is quickly becoming the new pride and joy of many and after $20 million, months of hard work, and seeing the building’s result, it is easy to see why. The new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center will be able to seat up to 546 people in the performance hall, which is 246 more than the 300 seats in the Hughes performance hall. This new feature on campus will bring students live cinema, plus it will be equipped with a spacious lobby and a box office with a walk-up window. The Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center will also hold classes for students looking to broaden their performing skills. “We don’t have an official date for the dedication ceremony at this time, but it will be in October. At that event, which will be open to the public, there will be a ribbon cutting and tours of the facility,” James Stafford, Director of marketing and Public Relations, told Belton journal during an interview. Director of Operations & Technical Director for the Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center, Erik Vose, believes the new addition to campus will be extremely beneficial and will open more options for the College of Visual and Performing Arts to offer the student body. Shyanne Hoffman, a freshman forensics major with a music minor, says she is excited for the new opportunities the building and the class will have in store for her. “I think it’s going to be a great addition to UMHB and I’m excited to see what amazing things it has to offer.” Hoffman said. Freshman music education major, Makaila Showels, believes the newest addition to campus will be able to give her a new sense of responsibility. “I am very excited. I never had a chance to perform or work in a brand new Performing Arts building. “This building will provide music and performance students with a professional level performance space that will help them gain better experience as performers,” Vose said. “The rest of the student body will also have a beautiful new venue to visit for their Fine Arts Experience credits. Hopefully, they will enjoy the experience enough to come back even when they don’t need credit.” The Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center is the last project of the 2011 Campus Master Plan and will pave the way for more innovative plans to...

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Photography exhibit gives budding artists hands-on experience
Apr26

Photography exhibit gives budding artists hands-on experience

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Townsend Memorial Library is hosting a new kind of exhibit that will last through the end of the year in honor of Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, which is celebrated April 30. The exhibit displays works of art created through pinhole photography, which professor John Hancock’s Photography 2 class is learning. “Pinhole photography uses a pinhole camera, or a camera obscura,” he said. “A camera obscura is basically a lightproof box with a small hole, or aperture, in it.” The lightproof box houses a piece of photo paper, which is light sensitive and records what the small hole sees, just like the eye does.” “After the paper is exposed, we take it to the dark room and develop it with chemicals using a wet darkroom technique. The image results in a negative photo, so we have to develop it twice to get an image.” This is Hancock’s first semester teaching in-depth pinhole photography. Although this technique of photography has been mentioned before in his classes, this semester’s students experienced the whole process, from building the cameras themselves to developing and hanging the images in the library. “We built [the pinhole cameras] in class as a part of a hands-on, student-based learning exercise. I think student-centered learning is far more effective than lecturing.” Besides the perk of avoiding lecturing, Hancock also enjoys the environment that is created through the process of developing the images. “I like that we’re able to bring in a classroom community that works together and helps each other. It was more of a community of just creating without worrying about the outcome of a grade.” Hancock jokingly said that his biggest goal for the semester was for his students to “have fun making art and wasting materials.” But he added that his actual desire was to teach his students to “take control of stealing light and time; taking [coal] and turning it into a diamond.” “Learning about the process and learning to appreciate it was my biggest takeaway,” said senior graphic design major, Kameryn Boggess. “We’re so used to snapping photos over and over, and just taking it again if we don’t like it.” “I’ve enjoyed [learning pinhole photography] immensely, but it definitely took a lot of patience,” she said. Though all parts of the pinhole photography process were fascinating to the class, Hancock’s favorite part is the hands-on aspect that developing photos in the darkroom demands. “As nerdy as it sounds, it kind of feels like alchemy; magic in the dark. It has a zen, soothing quality to it, with the running water and the red...

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