PAC almost finished: Faculty prepares for art performances
Aug23

PAC almost finished: Faculty prepares for art performances

In the spring semester of 2017, ground was broken to make way for a new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center on campus. Now, construction on the building is close to being finished and performances are being planned. The building is quickly becoming the new pride and joy of many and after $20 million, months of hard work, and seeing the building’s result, it is easy to see why. The new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center will be able to seat up to 546 people in the performance hall, which is 246 more than the 300 seats in the Hughes performance hall. This new feature on campus will bring students live cinema, plus it will be equipped with a spacious lobby and a box office with a walk-up window. The Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center will also hold classes for students looking to broaden their performing skills. “We don’t have an official date for the dedication ceremony at this time, but it will be in October. At that event, which will be open to the public, there will be a ribbon cutting and tours of the facility,” James Stafford, Director of marketing and Public Relations, told Belton journal during an interview. Director of Operations & Technical Director for the Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center, Erik Vose, believes the new addition to campus will be extremely beneficial and will open more options for the College of Visual and Performing Arts to offer the student body. Shyanne Hoffman, a freshman forensics major with a music minor, says she is excited for the new opportunities the building and the class will have in store for her. “I think it’s going to be a great addition to UMHB and I’m excited to see what amazing things it has to offer.” Hoffman said. Freshman music education major, Makaila Showels, believes the newest addition to campus will be able to give her a new sense of responsibility. “I am very excited. I never had a chance to perform or work in a brand new Performing Arts building. “This building will provide music and performance students with a professional level performance space that will help them gain better experience as performers,” Vose said. “The rest of the student body will also have a beautiful new venue to visit for their Fine Arts Experience credits. Hopefully, they will enjoy the experience enough to come back even when they don’t need credit.” The Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center is the last project of the 2011 Campus Master Plan and will pave the way for more innovative plans to...

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Photography exhibit gives budding artists hands-on experience
Apr26

Photography exhibit gives budding artists hands-on experience

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Townsend Memorial Library is hosting a new kind of exhibit that will last through the end of the year in honor of Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, which is celebrated April 30. The exhibit displays works of art created through pinhole photography, which professor John Hancock’s Photography 2 class is learning. “Pinhole photography uses a pinhole camera, or a camera obscura,” he said. “A camera obscura is basically a lightproof box with a small hole, or aperture, in it.” The lightproof box houses a piece of photo paper, which is light sensitive and records what the small hole sees, just like the eye does.” “After the paper is exposed, we take it to the dark room and develop it with chemicals using a wet darkroom technique. The image results in a negative photo, so we have to develop it twice to get an image.” This is Hancock’s first semester teaching in-depth pinhole photography. Although this technique of photography has been mentioned before in his classes, this semester’s students experienced the whole process, from building the cameras themselves to developing and hanging the images in the library. “We built [the pinhole cameras] in class as a part of a hands-on, student-based learning exercise. I think student-centered learning is far more effective than lecturing.” Besides the perk of avoiding lecturing, Hancock also enjoys the environment that is created through the process of developing the images. “I like that we’re able to bring in a classroom community that works together and helps each other. It was more of a community of just creating without worrying about the outcome of a grade.” Hancock jokingly said that his biggest goal for the semester was for his students to “have fun making art and wasting materials.” But he added that his actual desire was to teach his students to “take control of stealing light and time; taking [coal] and turning it into a diamond.” “Learning about the process and learning to appreciate it was my biggest takeaway,” said senior graphic design major, Kameryn Boggess. “We’re so used to snapping photos over and over, and just taking it again if we don’t like it.” “I’ve enjoyed [learning pinhole photography] immensely, but it definitely took a lot of patience,” she said. Though all parts of the pinhole photography process were fascinating to the class, Hancock’s favorite part is the hands-on aspect that developing photos in the darkroom demands. “As nerdy as it sounds, it kind of feels like alchemy; magic in the dark. It has a zen, soothing quality to it, with the running water and the red...

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Midnight March tradition continues
Apr26

Midnight March tradition continues

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Charter Day is a campus tradition that celebrates the history and heritage of the university and commemorates the initial signing of the school’s charter on February 1, 1845. It is usually celebrated on the first Wednesday of each February. Sophomores ring the sophomore bell and seniors place a wreath at the grave of Judge R.E.B. Baylor located in Heritage Plaza. The school recently celebrated the 172nd year since being chartered in 1845. This year, the school spiced things up by having a charter weekend on Friday April 21 and Saturday April 22. Many events were held on campus to celebrate the occasion, which included a Heritage Club tea and reception, a dinner and floral presentation, multiple club reunions, and the Midnight March and robing ceremony. The school even provided campus tours for visiting alumni to see how much the school has grown. A dinner and floral presentation were held on Friday to honor the first ladies of UMHB. 1975 graduate Norman Northen presented original floral arrangements while telling heartfelt stories of the first ladies. The dinner also included a display of seven dresses, each owned by a first lady of UMHB. Jim and Caroline Cope met at UMHB and attended the weekend events. Caroline attended UMHB from 1963-1967 and Jim met her in ’63 before moving to Howard Payne. They attended the Charter Day festivities not only to celebrate the school’s founding, but also their 50th anniversary. Jim Cope studied PE with a biology minor here before he transferred, and Caroline studied Home Economics. “A lot has changed since we were students,” Jim Cope said. “There were only around ten buildings on campus when we were here.” Caroline’s class was the first to graduate from Walton Chapel after the original chapel burned down, and they were also the first people to see the construction of Getty’s Hall completed. “We really enjoyed the dinner and floral presentation, the chapel service, and the reunion events,” Caroline Cope said. Friday festivities also included the traditional Midnight March and robing ceremony that is an opportunity for students to honor their friendships with each other and exhibit their loyalty to the university. During the week prior, seniors give candles to special friends and invite them to attend the event. The robing ceremony symbolizes the passing of the student leadership from the senior class to the junior class. Seniors place their caps and gowns on the juniors, and this is the first time the juniors can sing the alumni/senior song, “Up with the Purple.” Rumored to have started in 1902, this tradition is a highlight...

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Sharing the Gospel: students perform Easter Pageant for 78th time
Apr26

Sharing the Gospel: students perform Easter Pageant for 78th time

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells “It is finished.” A crowd of students dressed in Biblical apparel cheer as Jesus’ last words on the cross are spoken, while a tearful audience of community members watch as the Gospel comes to life before their eyes. On Wednesday April 12, UMHB students took the stage for the 78th time to perform the Easter Pageant for friends, family and local residents at 12:30, 3 and 5:30 p.m. at Luther Memorial. This year, the Campus Activities Board broadcasted the 12:30 and 3 p.m. performances live on Facebook, so the students were able to literally perform the story of the Gospel to the whole world. University President Randy O’Rear chose senior public relations and music major Jacob Asmussen to play the role of Jesus, and he chose senior cellular biology major Sophie Rivera to portray Mary. Senior Christian studies major Maddie Rarick directed this year’s pageant. Asmussen chose those who portrayed his disciples, and he took careful consideration to pick a diverse group of men just as Jesus did. “I wanted guys who I really thought could benefit from the experience and really get something out of it. So I got a mix of friends and people I didn’t know as well, so it ended up being a patchwork of guys that really became a brotherhood.” Rarick and her assistant directors chose who portrayed the rest of the named roles such as Jarius and his wife, the bride and groom, Barabas, Pilate, and others. The crowd consisted of any student who was interested in being a part of Easter Pageant. Asmussen said that during this time he learned who he was in Christ. “It was a lot of growth in my own personal life with my relationship with Jesus and what I believe and really becoming who He’s created me to be,” he said. Senior business management major Caleb Latson, who portrayed the disciple Peter, enjoyed the time leading up to the Easter Pageant and working with Asmussen. “Jacob’s one of my closet friends , and that made it super easy to just relax and have fun during practice. At first it took some time for all the disciples to get comfortable around each other, but it didn’t take too long before we were all really good friends.” Asmussen said the actual day of the performance was exhausting, but he enjoyed it. “Each show had a different feel to it; something I learned from it. I was really thinking a lot that day about who Jesus is and who He is to me, and it was a very powerful day...

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Students experience new side of Gospel while preparing for pageant
Mar29

Students experience new side of Gospel while preparing for pageant

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells What if you could be a part of a story that’s greater than yourself? It is a story so amazing, it has been passed down for around 2,000 years. It is a story of resurrection, salvation, and an everlasting love. The story is that of Jesus Christ’s life, death and resurrection, and the university puts on an annual pageant to portray these events. Students have participated in this tradition for the past 77 years, and will once again take the stage for the 78th time on Wed. April 12 at 12:30, 3, and 5:30 p.m. The Easter Pageant has been ingrained in UMHB culture and has become a huge community event. Hundreds of people from all around gather to view the Easter Pageant. The pageant is not only life-changing for those who watch it, but also for those who participate in the program. The director of the program, senior Christian studies major Maddie Rarick, has been involved with the Easter Pageant for two years. During her second year at the university, she helped Student Foundation transport alumni to a reception after each showing of the Easter Pageant. Last year, she co-led the costumes committee. Rarick says that everyone, regardless of what roll they play in the Easter Pageant, can learn something important from participating. “The beauty of being in the Easter Pageant is that you get to see the Gospel story from a different perspective,” Rarick said. “If you are a crowd person, you get to see the Gospel and Jesus from the perspective of the crowds that followed or despised Christ. If you’re on the props committee, you get to see what physical objects Jesus used, and thus see his humanity in new ways. If you’re the director, you get to see all those perspectives come to fruition in the minds and hearts of those in the Easter Pageant.” The director believes students should be involved with the Easter Pageant to see the Gospel in a new way and to be a part of a joyful tradition on campus. Franklin Groseclose, a junior Christian Studies major and assistant director of the Easter Pageant believes this year’s performance will be one of the best. “I think this year is going to be awesome. Every year God has given UMHB the gift of clear weather and this year has been no different,” Groseclose said. “As more and more people show interest I, as well as the other directors, become more and more excited. This portrayal of the death and resurrection of Jesus has touched so many, and I can’t wait...

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Foreman delivers McLane Lecture Heavyweight champion shares message of perseverance and faith
Mar29

Foreman delivers McLane Lecture Heavyweight champion shares message of perseverance and faith

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Heavyweight champion, minister and entrepreneur are just a few roles George Foreman is known for by his adoring fans. On Wed. March 22, Foreman shared personal life experiences with faculty, staff and community members during the annual McLane Lecture sponsored by Elizabeth and Drayton McLane Jr. The lecture began with McLane introducing Foreman by describing a few of his accomplishments, including fathering 10 children, five of them named George. “I was in the room one time and somebody asked him why he named them all George, and he said, ‘if you’ve been hit in the head as many times as I have, you’d name them all George too,’” McLane said to a burst of laughter from the audience. Foreman set up his lecture by telling about an experience he had sharing his past with one of his sons. He began with his childhood in Houston’s 5th Ward, where he frequently skipped school. As a teenager, Foreman began stealing and mugging people with other boys in the neighborhood. After one such mugging, Foreman had to hide from the police underneath a house and cover himself with sewage slime to keep police dogs from sniffing him out. “I said if I get out from under this house, I will never steal anything again.” Foreman then joined the United States Department of Labor Job Corps to get a fresh start. While at the job corps, Foreman became interested in amateur boxing. He decided to transfer to California to go to boxing school. A year later, he earned a spot on the 1968 US Olympic team, where he competed in Mexico City. “My mom never wanted me to box. After I told [my mom] I was fighting a Russian, she didn’t even tell me to hurry home and eat, she said, ‘well, bye.’” Foreman defeated the Russian boxer to become the Olympic Gold medalist in boxing. “That was probably the happiest moment I’ve had in my athletic career,” Foreman said. “For the first time in my life a dream had come true.” Foreman began his professional boxing career after the Olympics. He fought in many matches, before he was matched against the reigning heavyweight champion of the world, Joe Frazier. “Joe Frazier was the type of fellow that they said you hit and he liked it. If you missed him, he got upset… He had beaten everyone.” Foreman knocked out Frazier during the second round to become the heavyweight champion of the world. “I stood in the ring, and I was all those [former] champions in that moment.” Foreman also recounted his famous...

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