Vacation cruises to disaster
Mar06

Vacation cruises to disaster

By Ashleigh Bugg “The urine was burning my ankles so bad I had to roll my pant legs up …. Everything was contaminated. There was so much scavenging and stealing; it was a mad house.” UMHB landscape supervisor William Dugger and his family expected a relaxing four-day cruise to Mexico on the Carnival ship, Triumph. What they got instead was a hellish eight-day voyage that exemplified the best and worst of human nature. A fuel oil leak Feb. 10 caused a fire in the engine room of the ship, leaving nearly 3,000 passengers adrift and without power for five days. “Our biggest thing was we didn’t know if the world knew or not,” Dugger said. “When that generator went out, people didn’t panic. They just got really quiet. We were all in shock.” Passengers quickly formed “tribes.”  Dugger, his wife, Kim, and their 16-year-old son , Lance, stayed at the back of the ship near the top deck. They made make-shift beds out of deck chairs and pillows. Passengers were forced to break open fire doors just to get air. “We needed protection from the storms. The nights got really cold. We wouldn’t let anybody in our area. One guy just ran up and tried to steal our bunks,” Dugger said. Kim Dugger believes the ordeal was something nobody should have to go through. She said, “In my opinion, we were sitting ducks in international waters without protection for way too long.” While Dugger remained civil and tried to make the best of the situation, others, like the crowds camped out nearby, were not as humane. “That was the greediest group…. People got very possessive. There was a lot of destruction and hoarding,” Dugger said. “One man accidentally kicked an elderly woman’s cane. When he turned around, he said, ‘Old people shouldn’t be on a cruise ship.’ There were two guys at the bottom of the stairs that had a word with him.” People stood in long lines to receive food. Hoarding was rampant. Some would take more food than they needed, let it spoil and throw it away rather than sharing with their fellow passengers. “I stood in line for a hamburger for four hours,” Dugger said. “There was a guy with a backpack that stood in front of some kids. He took tons of hamburgers and shoved them in his bag.” Although the experience brought out the worst in some passengers, it also showed the resilience of others. “I’ve never been more proud of my son. He and a group went throughout the ship to find all the power cords and outlets so that people could charge...

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Director of Blue Like Jazz visits campus

Steve Taylor shows students how faith and Christians in the entertainment industry can be influential in the types of everyday films that are released in Hollywood. Taylor is a Christian record producer, director and songwriter. He has earned multiple recognition awards for his work, including Grammys, Billboard and Dove awards. His most recent accomplishment is directing the film Blue Like Jazz. He spoke in Chapel Feb. 20 about faith and Christians in the arts. Associate Professor and music department Chair Dr. Mark Aaron Humphrey thinks Taylor is a great representation of what a Christian artist should be. “Obviously, he’s a talented guy, and he’s succeeded in many different areas, as a pop musician, as a producer of videos and of albums and now as a filmmaker, so I think that’s one of the things that I really found fascinating about him…how he’s reinvented himself,” he said. Sophomore finance major Kristina Liu enjoyed the chapel service. She explains what her favorite moment was during the assembly. “When he was talking about the movement of creating new and original art instead of recreating ideas that have already been done, I agree with it. A lot of the art, music and movies that have been coming out lately have traced back to things that have been done years or decades ago,” she said. After Chapel, students were encouraged to attend the free screening of the film directed by Taylor. It is a film adaption based on Donald Miller’s semi-autobiographical novel by the same name. The book is a collection of essays chronicling the author’s understanding of God and his experiences at Reed College. Humphrey thinks the novel can have a strong impact on those who read it, regardless of what their religious background is. “It’s one of those books where I think no matter where you are in belief, is worth reading. No matter what your beliefs are, you are going to have a lot you can identify with in the book,” he said. Fans of the book shouldn’t expect the film to play out the same way. “This is kind of a coming-of -age tale when he goes to Reed College in Portland. I think they do a good job of telling the story of Don’s life, but a lot of the commentary and things Don wrestled with are just a little part of the overall movie. If you’re a Blue Like Jazz fan, you definitely want to watch the movie, but know that it only tells the narrative from the book,” he said. Blue Like Jazz recounts the tale of a young man on a journey of self-discovery after he...

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Concert to help campus family adopt
Mar06

Concert to help campus family adopt

By Sarah Norrell The stage is set: three chairs sit in the corner by the door, two holding guitars and one holding an amp connected to speakers. Two microphone stands guard the chairs like soldiers. The chairs are filled, and the floor is packed with people as the smell of coffee fills the air. The sounds of coffee beans being ground, people laughing and games of pool mix through the building as the atmosphere of excitement swells. Students, faculty, and community members gathered at Arusha Coffee in downtown Belton Friday night to enjoy music by up-and-coming singer Sarah Hurst. The concert, put on by pro-life organization Cru for Life, was to raise money to aid Gettys Resident Director Phillip Jones and his wife Jenny in adopting a baby from China. As a new event put on by Cru for Life, the concert has been months in the making. “We had the idea to have this event last semester, and we have a best friend who happens to be an awesome singer/songwriter who agreed to do it,” Cru for Life secretary and junior nursing major Carolyn Rice said. “It just sort of all came together; people used their different gifts and talents to really contribute.” Phillip and Jenny Jones have never experienced something like the concert, and were excited by the turnout. “This is the first time anything like this has ever happened to us, and we’re just blown away,” Phillip Jones said. “God is teaching us a lot out of this; He’s teaching us to receive well.…The fact that someone wanted to put on this concert is impacting and ministering to us in ways we can’t even explain.” Cru for Life president and senior nursing major Stephanie Taylor hopes the concert will bring about more opportunities for the organization to show their support of adoption while representing Christ and UMHB. “This opportunity was kind of an open door for Cru for Life, and we hope it sets off a domino effect for other people that are maybe looking to adopt or just to fundraise because that’s what the body of Christ does. Cru for Life is really excited.” Rice and Taylor met the Joneses at First Baptist Church Belton, and have been interested in their adoption process since it was first mentioned. “They talked about adoption for a long time, and then they actually started the process several months ago,” Rice said. “So just getting to be around them, hear their story, and just listen to the adoption process, we yearn to do something to help.” A friend of Rice and Taylor, singer/songwriter Sarah Hurst was happy to perform...

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Creativity inspires original team names
Mar06

Creativity inspires original team names

Whether it is intramural flag football, volleyball, basketball or a campus recreation dodge ball tournament, there are sure to be some teams with out-of-the-box names. Basketball is the intramural sport taking place now, and team names range from the Chinchillas, to the White Mambas, to No Game This Week, to the Post-Docs. To eliminate inappropriate names and  maintain clean fun, all team names are now reviewed before being confirmed into the league through imleagues.com. “We’ve had to take a stricter line on what’s an allowable team name and what’s not,” Director of Campus Recreation Sue Weaver said. “Anything that has negative undertones… we try to keep away from those.” However, that has not kept students from coming up with creative names. Weaver said that most students “just want a fun, interesting name that will make them stand out.” Each name has a story behind it that in some way reflects the team itself. For example, junior nursing major Taylor Frank tells the story behind the name of her intramural team. “It started when we got a group of friends together to play soccer last semester, and we were down to the deadline to make up a name and get it all together,” she said. “My boyfriend, Chase Covington, wrote the first thing that popped into his head. Everyone ended up loving it, and decided that now every intramural team we have, we’ll be the fighting Chinchillas.” The Chinchillas show the fun side of the often competitive intramural sports scene. “The name is important because it represents what we’re all about, just having fun,” Frank said. “I think it’s one of the least intimidating names you can get, but it amuses us and gets us excited. It also adds to the team spirit.” Another team, that consists of four members of the men’s golf team, named its basketball team the White Mambas. This was a nickname for former NBA player Brian Scalabrine that jokingly compared him to Kobe Bryant. Junior exercise and sport science major Justin Judkins said their name is a tribute to Scalabrine. However, students are not the only ones getting creative. A group of professors have their own original team name with specific meaning. “We picked our name based on a play of words,” exercise  and sport science instructor Dr. Jason Reese said. “There are two meanings here: The first meaning… is that everyone on our team has their doctorate in something. So our name came from this fact, plus the basketball terminology to ‘post-up’. Hence the name Post-Doc.” Weaver encourages students to create an imleagues.com account so that they can know about upcoming events. “We need...

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Clubs partner to spread ‘amor’

By Ashleigh Bugg Valentine’s Day can be a beautiful experience for happy couples and Hallmark stores but can leave others with a bitter taste in their mouths that has nothing to do with dark chocolate. Students from the Campus Activities Board wanted to make the holiday a positive event for students, regardless of their relationship status. CAB members passed out buttons with a simple message: “You are loved.” “Not everyone has another person to be with or can be with the person they love today,” junior education major and CAB member Jess Hoerman said.  “We want everyone to feel loved.” The idea is based on the group You Are Loved, an organization dedicated to sharing the story of Jesus Christ through buttons. The purpose of the pins is simple: to remind others that they are valued and get them to think about why. The organization was founded in 2006 by Dave Navarra, a high school senior at the time. 55,000 pins have been produced and distributed throughout the world. The mission is to spread as much love as possible to people from all walks of life. The website promises three free pins to everyone who sends an envelope with their mailing address. Navarra makes the point on his website that the pins themselves are not there to “love” anyone but to remind Christians to follow Christ’s commands and start conversations. “I didn’t celebrate Valentine’s with anyone this year. It really made me smile to know that CAB cared,” sophomore psychology student Amy Valenta said. “We want everyone on campus to know this is all inclusive and that they are loved,” Hoerman said. CAB wasn’t the only organization to play cupid this year. The Spanish Club sold chocolates with Spanish verses to raise money for their upcoming trip to the Riverwalk and  the Alamo. “Each chocolate has a message in English and Spanish. It’s folded kind of like a fortune cookie,” junior nursing student Rachel Love said. Students bought chocolate with the usual Valentine’s greetings such as “I love you” and “You’re beautiful.” However, some cards had more unusual sayings. Sophomore nursing student Sarah Patty picked a verse that said, “Mariposo de sueno, te pareces a mi alma,” or “Dream butterfly, you look like my soul.” She said, “Forget valentines, I’m buying this one for my roommate.” Spanish club members were eager to show that Valentine’s Day is more than a holiday for love-struck couples. In various Latin American countries, including Costa Rica and Colombia, the holiday is not only for couples. It is known as Día del Amor y la Amistad translated the Day of Love and Friendship. Floral...

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Chapel service kicks off Lent for students

By Paola Nunez On the day that marks the beginning of Lent, known as Ash Wednesday, the Catholic Student Organization gave students a look inside this largely Catholic tradition during chapel Feb. 13. “There are a lot of things that it commemorates,” sophomore psychology major and organization member Michelle Lopez said. “Forty is an important number in the Bible. It stands for the 40 years of the Jews in the desert, Jesus’ 40 days of temptation in the desert, and now it’s the 40 days that we wait before Easter. Those are the biggest three that are always talked about.” Lent is the 40-day period of fasting and repentance considered to be preparation for the celebration of Easter and is a custom practiced by many Christians aside from Catholics, including Anglicans and Lutherans. The majority of individuals commonly know it to be the time when they give up something that they depend on every day, or that they enjoy or consume regularly, but there is more to the  tradition than that. Graduate education major and member of CSO Angelica Villafuerte said, “For me, it’s not always about giving something up, but trying to add something to your routine that will make you closer to God.” She said this can vary from trying to read excerpts from the Bible more often or setting aside more time for prayer each day. The video presented at the beginning of chapel illustrated Galatians 2:20, the scripture the organization used to base their meaning of Lent to the students. It describes the way one should act and what to remember during the days leading up to Easter. It reads, “I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me; and the life I now live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God who loved me and gave Himself for me.” Deacon Ronnie Lastivica from Christ the King Catholic Church joined the organization at chapel and during the homily, when the Gospel reading is explained, he said, “What Christ really wants from us is our hearts…. He wants us to be able to go out and be willing to love other people, as He has loved us, so much that we are willing to sacrifice ourselves for love of Him, and for love of God.” He gave the reason why people give up something important and try to grow spiritually during Lent: the sacrifice signifies the resolve to give oneself to God, as Jesus gave Himself. Senior nursing major and club president Keenan Mullins said, “I think a lot of people...

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