Black history month
Feb25

Black history month

By Emily Keahey Every February, the achievements of African Americans are recognized, as well as the impact the ethnic group has had on America. A recent study indicates a greater satisfaction with the nation’s direction. The milestones they have made in America range from a woman who refused to give up her seat on a bus, to Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier by being the first African American to play professional baseball. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom. A man can’t ride you unless your back is bent.” Many see Luther’s dream further brought to reality with the inauguration of President Barack Obama − the first African American in the United States to hold the office. Throughout history, their influence on American culture is apparent; music, literature, clothing styles and technological innovations are just a few of the areas. A few of the most notable people include writers Langston Hughes and Maya Angelou, musicians Ray Charles and Tina Turner and athletes Muhammad Ali and Michael Jordan. Their influence has not only helped shape America, but the entire world. An African American doctor by the name of Daniel Hale Williams completed the first successful open heart surgery and Otis Bodkin invented an electrical device which is now used in all guided missiles. On a smaller scale, but equally important, stories can be found on campus. Director of Community Service and Cultural Affairs, Dr. George Harrison is an alumnus of UMHB along with a number of his relatives. Growing up, he had a gift for music and when he reached college he auditioned for the elite choral group now known as One Voice. Upon his acceptance, he became the first African American to join the group. Harrison said, “It is important that we celebrate black history month on campus because it reflects the culture of our university, and we are very multicultural.” To recognize black history month, the university has several activities to celebrate and raise awareness. One way is through Wednesday and Friday chapel. This year music was performed by senior Leslie Cross with Jake Mayfield accompanying her. Then the children’s group Perfect Praise performed under the direction of Yolondia (Baby Kay) Keys. Senior cellular biology major Bridget Blanchard said, “Seeing the kids perform was really inspirational. Not only is the program keeping them out of trouble, it is also a positive learning experience.” Chapel finished off with a clip of Dr. Martin Luther King’s speech, “I have a dream.” Another annual event...

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Controversial bill could pass
Feb25

Controversial bill could pass

The job creation bill is getting closer to passing, according to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) Many Republicans disagree, as they are pulling their support from the supposedly bipartisan bill according to the AP. The bill was scaled back from $85 billion to $15 billion after Democrats complained that it helped large companies too much and the unemployed too little. When so much of the money left, so did many Republicans. Director of Career Services Don Owens has been watching the job market as he prepares students for their futures. While hiring fell greatly last year and has recovered only partially since, Owens says graduates are not in that great of peril. “We are at a 10 percent unemployment rate, which we have not seen in a long time,” he said. “But that higher education gives you a leap pad over everyone else. You’re going to have some advantages, but still it is hard work.” The bill is a top priority for the Obama administration, and its passing is important for Democrats going into the midterm elections. They have already lost the super majority with the addition of Republican Sen. Scott Brown of Massachusetts. Many have felt that the Democratic congress has been unproductive. Others view the Republicans as being uncooperative. Regardless of opinion, unemployment is a problem in America. Senior education major Beth Koinm is moving to Atlanta after graduation and will need a job. “In a way, I’m worried, probably because I’m going to another state,” she said. “There (were) a lot of people that graduated from here that didn’t get jobs so I worry about why would they choose me.” Koinm thinks increased government assistance would be beneficial to her field. “A lot of older teachers who are planning to retire are not retiring because of the economy,” she said. “I think they should push younger people because we know more about technology and education philosophies.” Owens has advice for students as they face the market. “You’ve got to have a good resume and make sure you have good credentials. Especially if you’re a sophomore you need to get into internships and make good grades that set you apart,” he said. “You’re not just competing against your classmates but against a workforce globally.” Freshman computer graphics design major Dillon Mogford thinks technology is the key to his success. “As a graphic design major you learn more than just graphic design. You also learn Web mastering, video stuff and things like that,” he said. “The future seems to be in technology. So with a job that is technology based, I feel rather confident in getting a...

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One Voice performs
Feb25

One Voice performs

One Voice, a choir made of 10 students, is both an educational music program as well as a ministry. Dr. Matthew Crosby, a university alum, is the choral director. The group is a scholarship choir that represents the university at various community events and high schools and travels across the world sharing their faith through song. The choir leaves town two weekends a month, mostly travelling to area churches. Crosby has lead the group for seven years. He said, “This year, it was a goal of mine to sing at everybody’s church that was in the group.” Senior Leslie Cross has been a member for three years. She said, “I think for the group to go to a member’s church helps them know the person more and have a better understanding.” It was fun for her fellow choir members to visit her home church. “(My) being African American, they didn’t know what to expect,” she said. One Voice also holds several concerts on campus and takes part in Easter Pageant. Cross said the choir does more than “getting UMHB’s name out there” and recruiting new students. “First and foremost, we are showing Christ,” Cross said. “It’s a ministry.” In addition to spreading the word about the university, Crosby believes their purpose remains a ministry. “It’s really important to me to keep the mission of what we do Christ centered because it just helps with the unity and helps us to grow as Christians and as a group,” he said. Freshman church music major Cameron Roucloux said One Voice helped him adjust to the transition to college life. “It was really like going from one family environment into another one,” he said. “It’s just been a really big blessing for me. The people in there are genuine.” Crosby tries to schedule an international trip one year, and the next the group records a CD. This summer, they plan to go to Spain and Portugal on a 12-day trip. The group will perform and assist missionaries in the area. The opportunity to travel is special for choir members. The farthest away from home Roucloux has been is the Mexican border. “I haven’t been overseas,” he said. “I haven’t ridden on a plane for that long before, so I’m really excited.” Contrary to popular belief, students do not have to be music majors to be part of One Voice. “I think music is a big part of anyone’s life,” Cross said. With the common ground of enjoying music and sharing faith, not being a music major shouldn’t keep someone from auditioning. Cross said, “I would definitely encourage non-music majors to do it....

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Free rent for summer class
Feb25

Free rent for summer class

By Anna Jauregui Big chances to save some money will come to students who chose to take classes on campus this summer. Dr. Steve Theodore, senior vice president for administration and chief operating officer, sent information regarding housing changes for the approaching summer sessions to students through their sadermail accounts at the end of last semester, and some students will take advantage of the opportunity. The change is that those who enroll in and complete a total of six hours or more in coursework during the May term, Summer I or Summer II will be allowed to live in campus apartments rent free during those months. Donna Plank, associate dean of students and director of residence life said charges for housing will be credited to the student’s account after their completion of at least six hours during the summer sessions. “A student who is planning to take a May term class and a summer II class can apply to live in housing for all three available terms, May term, summer I and summer II, and will not have a charge for housing as long as six hours are completed sometime during the summer,” Plank said. The offer does include all apartments on campus. Plank said, “Summer housing applications will be available in the Residence Life Office by March 1, and anyone interested in living on campus this summer must complete an application. The application will ask for information about summer classes the student plans to take.” This offer does not apply to students receiving tuition remission, although it is available to all incoming freshmen who do not fall into the category. “Someone who wants to live in housing during the summer can still do so even if he or she doesn’t plan to enroll in classes. The normal summer housing rates would apply, and anyone planning to do this would also fill out the summer housing application.” Plank said. For many students like junior cell biology and Spanish major Victoria Meadows, summer classes are benefi cial because the time seems to go by faster than the usual spring or fall semesters. She said,“It was great. I really liked being able to take care of an entire class in just a...

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Hope in sight for Haitians
Feb24

Hope in sight for Haitians

The devastation of Haiti’s earthquake shook many students’ lives. Families have been torn apart and hearts were broken around the world for the people of Haiti. Churches, individuals and secular agencies have come together to provide food, water and shelter to the millions suffering from the quake’s damage. Hope for the Hungry, a local ministry, has developed a relationship with Haitians over a span of 27 years. During this time, Hope’s president Dan Kirkley and his team have built two orphanages: a boys’ home in Guibert and a girls’ home in Ferrier. They also support seven churches and a school of 400 students in the community of Guibert. The organization sent its first relief group, which included Kirkley, alumna and children’s ministry leader Jen Sutton and senior finance major and Hope financial development director Lindsey Weaver after the tragedy occurred. Guibert is 15 miles directly up a mountain from the country’s capital Port au Prince. It’s evident to see which surrounding towns were affected by the 7.1 quake. The girls’ home in Ferrier was untouched since it is located in northern Haiti — far from the epicenter of the quake. Weaver said the team flew into the northern part of Haiti and drove through the mountain range and the city of Port au Prince. It took them 12 hours. Distance wise, travel from Ferrier to Guibert would be “like from (Belton) to Dallas.” Once they came to Port au Prince, people were everywhere. Tent cities, which are shelters made of sheets, are constructed in the middle of roads, covering what used to be green grassy areas. Arriving in Guibert, they were relieved to know the boys were OK. Structurally, the boys’ home stands firm since it was built to a higher standard by Americans. “Fifty percent of the homes fell. Thirty percent of them are damaged, so they can’t move back into them because if there were any aftershocks, they would fall,” Weaver said. “Not one person died. It was a complete miracle.” Guibert will continue to be Hope’s main focus, and currently, they are the only aid group on the mountain. “It’s not just an occasional house here and there. The mountain is still densely populated,” she said. “A lot of our students’ homes have fallen, so we need to make sure they are taken care of, fed and given clean water.” Plans for rebuilding Guibert are underway. Hope’s first construction team will begin the process over spring break. “We’re developing the discipleship curriculum. When we lay the foundation, we’ll talk about how God should be the foundation of your life, and he’s the Rock and what that...

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Apple unveils the iPad
Feb10

Apple unveils the iPad

Apple released its newest gadget at its “Big Announcement” convention Jan. 27, revealing the iPad: a “slate” tablet computer meant to compete with the Amazon Kindle and other e-reader devices. Apple is marketing the product as an in-between technology. It is not a traditional computer, and it is not an iPod. However, many of the features of the iPad are not unfamiliar to iPod Touch or iPhone users. The iPad has a similar layout to the iPhone, using icons in rows and a dock to organize programs. The Safari web browser is almost exactly the same as well. Users will still be able to use the pinch-to-zoom and double tap to zoom in or out on photos, documents, Web sites and maps. The iPad also uses the same virtual keyboard as the iPhone and iPod Touch, but people interested in having a real keyboard can buy an additional docking station that puts the iPad in an upright position in a dock that includes a keyboard. The 9.5-inch glass touch screen allows for vivid display on the device and weighs in at just over one and a half pounds, making the iPad very portable. The battery life of 10 hours supersedes those of most laptops, but still falls short of the Amazon Kindle’s seven-day battery span. The product has received many negative reviews thus far, based only on Apple’s keynote address by CEO Steve Jobs. The exclusion of a webcam, multitasking, USB ports and incompatibility with Flash programming has caused tech enthusiasts to severely criticize the iPad. UMHB hardware engineer and iPhone user Angela Baker was unimpressed with the iPad, calling it a “giant iPod Touch.” “When you compare prices, you can get a lot more out of a laptop at the same price as opposed to what the iPad is providing,” she said. “It doesn’t really lend itself to a student’s needs, but it is a cute, trendy looking gadget.” Baker also added that some features could be added in future versions or other brands’ models to market to a wider audience and make the device more functional. She said, “I think it needs more peripheral ports like USB ports without the docking system. It needs more memory, more battery life and, unfortunately, the list goes on.” Junior visual communications major Colin Valerio is interested in the device but plans to wait until improvements are made. He said, “It’s just not worth it right now, plain and simple.” Senior Joseph Cantu has also decided not to invest, calling it an “oversized iPod Touch.” He said, “As the owner of both an iPhone and a MacBook Pro, the iPad will...

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