Students Defeat Tests
Apr25

Students Defeat Tests

Books, Scantron and number two pencils—the dreaded items that signify only one thing… tests. Although, the mere thought of examinations may send some into frenzy, many students weren’t afraid to share their preparation process for the semester farewell tests. “Definitely don’t wait until the last minute,” junior nursing major Araceli Ayala said. The statement remained a mutual tip among the students. In this case, good things do not come to those who wait. Learners recommended getting an early start to reviewing. “During finals I spend like two weeks studying straight,” junior pre-physical therapy major Jacy Mullins said. When students begin in advance, it’s easier to squeeze small study sessions into a daily routine. While getting an early start is not the latest news, students described their personal plan of action prior to final exam day. For cumulative exams, “learn the new material first, and then review the old stuff,” junior nursing major Alma Bolger said. “Always stick to the review, but skim other stuff too.” If professors take the time to create a review, most often they form questions from it, but prepare for anything. Ayala recommends asking her elders. “Usually a lot of older students will be kind and send you their old material from the class, so I’ll review that and then go back and create a blueprint how I think it should be done,” she said. In addition to professors’ reviews, students recommended making flashcards, rewriting notes or strictly reading. “Everybody studies different; just find what works for you,” Mullins said. For students who prefer group study sessions, Bolger advises reviewing the material alone before a meeting. Also, “keep study groups small,” Ayala said. Sessions tend to be more productive in groups of three to four people. If a dorm is not the ideal study spot, the campus provides students with plenty of learning space. Townsend Memorial Library offers a quiet section on the second level and areas for group study on the first floor. Nursing majors like Ayala and Bolger prefer to study in the new nursing building. “There is usually someone there who you can ask questions to,” Bolger said. Commanding students to cease the stress may seem like an ideal study tip, but it’s easier said than done. Instead, here are a few suggestions to help learners tackle any upcoming tests. Don’t procrastinate Discover your study niche—flashcards, reading, study sessions Create a to-do list with study goals Find a suitable study spot Review previous exams, reviews and material Ask questions—professors, students, parents Snack for brain power Take productive breaks—exercise, clean, read Get plenty of rest Reward yourself People have discovered their own preferences...

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Outpouring of help and support for West
Apr18

Outpouring of help and support for West

A deadly chemical explosion caused by a fire at a fertilizer plant in the town of West, Texas, north of Waco, left about 200 injured and an unconfirmed number deceased. Some news outlets are reporting as many as 50 dead and others as few as five. Crews from all over the state have been working tirelessly to make sense of the chaotic scene. Texas Gov. Rick Perry described it in a press conference as “truly a nightmare scenario.” In Amarillo, equipment measured the strength of the resulting jolt from the explosion as having the strength of a 2.5 earthquake on the Richter scale. The event has garnered national and international attention. Pope Francis even tweeted about the tragedy saying, “Please join me in praying for the victims of the explosion in Texas and their families.” President Barack Obama asked for a moment of silence in Congress this morning. In the midst of the tragedy, people have mobilized to help their neighbors. Assistant Professor and Lab Coordinator Kelda McMullen-Fix teaches nursing at UMHB and is an RN at the emergency department at Hillcrest Hospital in Waco. She was called into work last night as injured people started streaming into the emergency room from West. “I was out in the triage bay area where the ambulances were coming in and also private vehicles with injured people,” she said. McMullen-Fix was working with patients who were not seriously injured and could wait for a few moments to be placed in a hospital room. She said more than 100 people were taken to Hillcrest following the explosion. “There was a regular stream of ambulances and a pretty steady stream of cars,” McMullen-Fix said. “But there weren’t ambulances waiting one after another …. It was well organized, plenty of help. There were outstanding numbers of people who responded to come and help … people brought water … I think they bought Wal-Mart out of water.” Citizens of the Central Texas area and neighboring regions responded quickly to needs of those affected. This morning Bush’s Chicken offered to feed first responders. Last night, the East Texas Medical Center in Tyler sent teams to assist in the rescue efforts. Many other businesses have donated goods to residents and first responders. “It was really awesome to see that community wanting to help in that time,” McMullen-Fix said. There have been many conflicting reports concerning the death toll. Because of this, Gov. Perry urges people to remember that all information at this point is “very preliminary.” First responders are reported dead and missing. A final count of casualties and injuries is still in progress. Last night and this...

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TIPA: Student publications hoist awards, learn career skills
Apr17

TIPA: Student publications hoist awards, learn career skills

By Ashleigh Bugg Members of the newspaper and yearbook staffs returned from the annual Texas Intercollegiate Press Association convention in Ft. Worth April 4-6 with more than 50 awards. The Bells won 31 TIPA awards as well as Society of Professional Journalists awards for Region 8, an area that covers non-daily collegiate newspapers for all of Oklahoma and Texas. In the best all-around newspaper category, The Bells took home second place, and junior public relations major Christian Hernandez won first place in sports writing. The Bluebonnet, the university’s yearbook, won 23 awards total at TIPA, including an honorable mention for overall yearbook excellence. Sophomore elementary education major and yearbook editor Kathryn Smith won first place in the academics package category. Junior nursing major Mariana Jauregui placed second for her sports feature photo. The Bells staff members also acquired accolades from the Texas  Intercollegiate Press Association winning 24 print awards and four online honors. Senior mass communication/journalism major and Bells editor-in-chief JC Jones won first place in the in-depth reporting category. “My personal awards were great, but I’m most proud of how the staff did overall. It has been an honor to work with such a talented group of journalists,” she said. The TIPA convention hosted workshops on topics ranging from finding jobs in the journalism field to current social media trends. Students were encouraged by learning tips to find internships and ways to incorporate 3-D photography in newspapers. Participants at TIPA attended the Hall of Fame Induction luncheon Friday, April 5. Renowned reporter Kathleen McElroy was instated and delivered a short speech. Despite her small stature, McElroy commanded the room as she spoke to aspiring journalists about the necessity of thinking critically. “We’ve been programmed to accept certain things…. You must think ‘why are people telling you what they are telling you?’” McElroy urged students to remember that every situation has a backstory, and it’s imperative to use unique quirks and past experiences to their advantage. “When I started I had a superpower…. I was a black woman who knew sports. There needs to be diversity of thought. It’s about getting out of your realm.” Bob Ray Sanders of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram also  had inspirational advice for young media. “We don’t need more pretty people…. We need you to be committed to the truth. We need passion and compassion,” he said. Instead of taking stories at face value, TIPA participants were encouraged to pay attention to details and know their history. Although critics sometimes give journalism a bad rap, mentors like McElroy and Sanders believe young people will usher in a new era. “Journalism has been given a...

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What will you do Before You Turn 20?
Apr17

What will you do Before You Turn 20?

UMHB alumnus, author, and motivational speaker Lamar Collins spoke to students about his book Before You Turn 20 in chapel April 10. Collins has made history by becoming the first black mayoral candidate in Temple, Texas. However, his speech to students focused on five keys to success that he detailed in his book. The five points are as follows: Discover strengths Develop good friendships Maintain a positive attitude Discern God’s plan Discipline yourself “The gist of this book is to talk to, specifically, high school graduates and college graduates about the next phase of success in their life,” Collins said. He wants students to find their own strengths and apply those in their life. “When you feel bad about what you don’t have, you rob the world of the greatness that’s in you,” he said. “When you focus on the things you do well, you open up the doors of possibility to excel at what you do.” To illustrate the importance of good friendships, Collins talked about how captured crabs can never climb out of a bucket because when one gets to the top, another will pull it back down in its own attempt to escape. “Stay away from people who are like crabs in a bucket,” Collins said. “The second reason I tell you that story is to discourage you from being a crab in someone else’s bucket.” He finished his address quickly, going over the three final points from his book, reminding them to stay positive. “Life is a boomerang, and whatever you throw out, it comes back at you,” Collins  said. “That’s why it’s important to be a perpetually optimistic person.” He concluded the chapel service with an exhortation to the university. “So to the students and individuals here at UMHB I want to challenge you to be uncommon,” Collins said. “Here’s why I want you to be uncommon because success is uncommon. … So if you want to be successful, you can’t do what common people do.” In response to Collins’ thoughts, freshman business management major Austin Stecher said, “I liked how he encouraged everyone to find and act on their own strengths.” Sophomore exercise sport science major Daniel Villarreal responded positively to Collins’ encouragement. “Being normal is overrated,” Villarreal said. “The person who gets the job is the one who stands out. You have to go above and...

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Crusaders seal their mark on stadium by signing steel
Apr17

Crusaders seal their mark on stadium by signing steel

With the new stadium in its final construction stages, Crusaders had the opportunity to leave their own personal mark on the structure. Students, faculty and staff were given markers to sign one of the steel beams meant for the highest point of the new facility. Students from all over campus stopped by the alumni center parking lot between 8 and 11 a.m. to participate in the steel signing. Crusaders snapped pictures to capture the moment and keep the memory of the day fresh in their minds. Junior pre-physical therapy major Jacy Mullins shared the experience of the event with a few close friends. “I felt like it was a great way to leave my mark on campus, and it was something I will always remember doing,” she said. “I think students were excited to sign the steel because it was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Some of my friends didn’t care to join in signing (it), but the ones that did were really excited to do it.” To people who attend the university, the occasion was more than just adding their names to a steel beam. Some left Bible scriptures. Others left anonymous drawings. But the bottom line was  the students got to create their own little piece of history. This specific event was a rare opportunity. “There aren’t many times that a college does remodeling of their campus and allows you to do something like this. So, it was a way that we could all leave our mark on campus. Other people may never see those signatures, but we will always know that we signed that steel and can say that ‘my name is in the football stadium,’” Mullins said. But why would signing an inanimate object that will never be seen have such an impact on the campus? Mullins thinks this is a great way to leave a lasting legacy after graduation. “Students associated signing the beam as making history because our signatures are going to be on that piece of steel forever now. It’s something that other generations and other classes of UMHB can look at,” she said. Museum curator Betty Sue Beebe said the event is valuable to all Crusaders because it is a time of growth and progression for the university. Beebe is an alumna of the school and participated in the activity. “All of us who signed our names are a part of significant history of UMHB.  This is an important time for us to be students, faculty, staff and administration.  As time moves along, we can look back and feel good about our participation in this event,” she said. Director of alumni relations Rebecca...

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Playhouses built to host childhood memories
Apr17

Playhouses built to host childhood memories

Piles of wood, screws and soon-to-be clubhouse pieces lay outside the steps of Mabee last week for Cru Playhouses. The noise of power tools and laughter echoed through the quad as students came together to assemble scattered playhouse pieces. While the event gives Crusaders a week of an exciting, hands-on volunteer project, the houses built will represent years of memories for a child. “(Students) have the ability to build community within the different groups and have an amazing service opportunity,” assistant director of campus activities Jeff Sutton said. Cru Playhouses is a Student Life event that started five years ago to build playhouses for children of military families in Bell County. Since then, they have stayed connected with the university as the tradition continues. Various campus organizations do their part by sponsoring a playhouse. Participants are responsible for purchasing, building and delivering each house. This year, the project had 14 different university groups take on the project. Junior math major Lacy Hill came out to aid the resident assistants who sponsored a clubhouse, but stayed a little longer to help build additional houses. “I wanted to do it because I love little kids, and I think about how this is going to be some kid’s playhouse,” Hill said. “If anything was slightly off, I was like ‘No, we can’t mess this up. We need to make it perfect for them.’” Although Hill wasn’t able to help deliver houses at Saturday’s Reaching Out, she enjoyed the time she could spend building a memory for a child. The weeklong event wasn’t limited to the 14 groups that purchased a playhouse. Many students like sophomore exercise sport science major Taylor White, came on their own time throughout the week to help with the construction. “It’s really nice because not many military families have the opportunity to go out and buy a playhouse for their kids,” White said. “It’s good fellowship, and it’s all for a good cause.” Volunteers of Cru Playhouses didn’t let last week’s poor weather conditions stand in the way of building their masterpieces. Warm weather brought pristine conditions for Monday and Tuesday’s construction, but with Wednesday’s rain, the event was forced to move inside of Shelton Theater. Event leaders wouldn’t let the midweek showers put a damper on their plans. Sutton said their goal was to complete six playhouses that day, and the results were promising. “We are still going,” he said during Wednesday’s pour. Cru Playhouses were able to finish building outside the remainder of the week. While the construction process was hectic at times, Sutton enjoyed getting to see students give back to the community. He said,...

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