McLane College of Business
Sep10

McLane College of Business

Gracing the face of UMHB’s College of Business is the name of Drayton McLane Jr., one of the most successful Texas businessmen in the past few decades. On Aug. 28, university president Dr. Randy O’Rear announced that the College of Business will now be named the McLane College of Business. The decision was made public at Convocation, right before McLane addressed the audience as the keynote speaker. “It’s a great honor…. At first we didn’t think we deserved something like this, but they continued to talk to us, and we felt it was a great honor and we just feel very honored to be associated with the university,” McLane said in a press conference after Convocation. He also talked about his involvement in the community and university. “I’ve always felt a part of UMHB, and we have made contributions in the past. I’ve made talks at the business school over the last few years and felt a part of it even though I didn’t go to school here,” he said. McLane is the former owner of the Houston Astros, member of a successful family business and strong supporter of Christian universities. “I think what we need in America and in Texas more is higher Christian education. Christian universities are kind of declining in population .… I think a certain amount of the population really wants to be involved in Christian higher education.” He is not the only one who feels honored to have his name associated with the university. Interim dean of the College of Business Dr. Paul Stock is happy to have the name McLane recognized with the college. “We’re pretty excited about it. Drayton McLane and the McLane family have had a relationship with UMHB for a long time. And it kind of raises the bar for us because the way the McLane family stands for integrity and honesty and community service with Christian values, and we’re hoping it really inspires our students and faculty going forward,” Stock said. McLane was born in Cameron, Texas, and after attending college, he returned to Cameron where he began working the family’s wholesale grocery business. Being family did not provide him any shortcuts to success. O’Rear retold the story, saying McLane’s father “believed that to be an effective leader, you had to earn the respect of all of the employees. So he offered Drayton a job loading trucks on the night shift.” Over the next 20 years, McLane worked his way through the ranks of the business and eventually became the executive vice president. In 1978 he became the president and chief executive officer. The McLane Company is a food...

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ASTRA: It’s Peanut Butter, Jelly Time
Sep10

ASTRA: It’s Peanut Butter, Jelly Time

On the way out of the building, near two large bottles of hand sanitizer, a small embroidered cloth in a wooden frame reads, “It is in giving that we receive the greatest gift.” This trinket puts into words the actions carried out at the Salvation Army’s Feed My Sheep building located in Temple. It is a place where free meals are given out to the homeless every day by different groups that sign up for specific days of the month. For the university chartered community service organization, ASTRA, Feed My Sheep is a semester-long opportunity in which the organization has committed to serving the first Saturday of the month from September to December. “We do several events throughout the whole year. I did Feed My Sheep last year as well,” junior journalism major Brittany Pumphrey said. “It is really rewarding, to stop thinking about yourself for a little bit and help someone else in need.” Members of ASTRA convened Sept. 6, the night before the Feed My Sheep service project, to prepare 100 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches to distribute. Traci Squarcette, faculty sponsor for ASTRA, and two mothers of members in the ASTRA of Conservatory Club prepared a hot meal of baked spaghetti to be served as well. Feed My Sheep is the only place in Temple where the homeless can get free meals since the closure of Martha’s Kitchen. Benjamin Chason is a homeless man who has his food service license and volunteers to help cook meals. “I live out in the streets with these people every day,” Chason said. “I’ve been coming back and forth volunteering. I also serve at my church; we serve three meals a week.” ASTRA took over the Feed My Sheep service project from its parent organization, ALTRUSA. This is an international service organization that focuses on literacy and community service. “It’s nice they (students) take the time to volunteer. It kind of makes you proud,” ALTRUSA member Helen Roland said as she placed her hand over her heart. Like their parent organization, ASTRA focuses on literacy and participates in various outreaches that support literacy in roundabout ways. “Feeding the hungry ultimately helps them learn better,” Squarcette said. “We have groups that read to kids through ALTRUSA. When we did Canstruction last year, we built a big book and a book worm. (It was made up of) about 2,200 cans that went to Helping Hands.” Last year, ASTRA started with three members. By the end of last semester, the organization had 19 members, and 13 new members signed up at the most recent meeting. ASTRA meets every Thursday at 6 p.m. in...

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Man Dead on I-35
Aug30

Man Dead on I-35

On Thursday at approximately 4:25 p.m., a pedestrian was declared dead by Belton police after being struck by a vehicle near the I-35 and US Highway 190 intersection.  

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Bringing home royal baby
Aug27

Bringing home royal baby

Once upon a time—July 22 to be exact—people around the globe rejoiced at the birth of a prince. England gained a new heir, and the world fell in love with a tiny baby. His Royal Highness Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge is just over one month old, but the infant has already changed history. The baby’s arrival meant that, for the first time since 1894, three generations of direct heirs to the throne are alive at one time. Thanks to the increase of social media, His Royal Highness had the most anticipated birth in recent history. How many people get their own Wikipedia page before their first birthday? It all started when the fairy tale romance of Prince William and girl-next-door Kate Middleton swept fans off their feet. By the royal wedding in 2011, a generation was captivated as history was written before their eyes. UMHB junior English major Sarah Tipton spent seven weeks in England this summer. She recalls witnessing the nuptials on television. “I remember getting up at four or five in the morning with my mom and sister to watch the royal wedding,” she said. “I watched the entire ceremony with so much anticipation.” The moment William and Catherine tied the knot, excitement for the birth of an heir commenced. When the news broke on Dec. 3, fans of the couple rejoiced. Estimates for the due date, name and sex of the child were speculative. People began placing wagers on everything from the birth date to the baby’s future career. British bookies brought in well over $1 million. The traditional royal birth announcement was displayed on an easel outside Buckingham Palace, but the baby’s arrival was officially declared first in a palace press release á la 21st-century. Gun salutes and the ringing of bells filled the country. Iconic landmarks lit up blue to signify the birth of a boy. Photographers staked out St. Mary’s Hospital waiting for the picture-perfect moment. While she appreciated the excitement surrounding the prince’s arrival, Tipton found the media obsession a bit extreme. “Every news station wanted to be the first to catch a glimpse of HRH and it became a bit of a circus,” she said. “But I did enjoy how people celebrated the royal baby.” Two days after the birth, William and Kate selected their son’s name. While designating a princely name seemed notable, it is the smaller decisions William and Kate make that will likely infl uence others. The royals will certainly be scrutinized as they raise their son. “I think Will and Kate’s parenting choices are already having an impact … Doubtlessly many mothers will take into...

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San Antonio: Spur in Miami’s side
Aug27

San Antonio: Spur in Miami’s side

Chris Bosh of the Miami Heat resembles a prehistoric animal—this much I know. Before the NFL kicks back up, a short review of this summer’s conclusion to the National Basketball Association is in order. After a season of ups, downs and lockouts, NBA fans’ hearts could not be happier about the dramatic finish in June. Well, excluding those San Antonio Spurs fans. The Miami heat clinched a back-to-back championship that was just a little sweeter than usual. Imagine Splenda sprinkled on top of ice cream, all served in an edible sugar cone. That was just how sweet this victory became. Why? The Miami Heat, without a doubt, endure a lot of hate when it comes to professional sports teams. Speculators argue that the franchise “bought the win” in 2012, and again in 2013. By signing three superstars for less money than they could earn elsewhere, the Miami owners built what many call an unfair roster. While other teams possess a Big Three, Lebron James and Chris Bosh remain traitors in these self-proclaimed haters’ minds because James and Bosh left their previous team to be part of Dwyane Wade and the Heat’s national basketball experiment. During the championship series, people all over the Internet proclaimed, “My basketball philosophy: Any team that isn’t the Miami Heat.” That stings, whether your fandom lies in Lebron’s team or not. Dramatic blowouts and nail-biting buzzer-beaters made this series all the more interesting. When San Antonio came out swinging in the first match up, the Heat returned the favor. This back-and-forth competition continued until the Spurs had everything they needed for Tim Duncan’s big win and likely departure into retirement. Up 3-2, the Texas team looked like it had the upper hand. The Heat needed two wins, and the Spurs needed one. Yet, the Florida team prevailed and rallied to conquer the Spurs in game six. Miami returned for home court advantage in game seven, where they finished off their veteran opponents for a 95-88 win. This victory gave the Heat their second title in three years causing many to wonder if they could possibly be the new dynasty of this decade. The past ten years belonged to the Los Angeles Lakers and San Antonio Spurs, but it is beginning to look like a new team may be taking over in the NBA. James earned yet another MVP titled and reassured the nation he has “no worries” in reference to the animosity. The 2013 draft gave many teams new faces. These rookies had a chance to show off their talent during this season’s summer league. Though the games usually showcase many mistakes and blunders, the...

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Surviving small-town summer
Aug27

Surviving small-town summer

The convulsion of a jackhammer working on Crusader Stadium beat through the silence of the Quad. Squirrels raced along vacant lawns. And President Randy O’Rear skidded along empty sidewalks in his golf cart, taking left turns with the skill of a veteran Nascar driver. “Campus is a ghost town during summer,” junior nursing major Joseph Salley said. Salley was one of a handful of students who kept UMHB company over the break. He took six hours of courses at the university and another six at Temple College. But even though campus looked bare, Sally said, “There is actually a decent amount of people here during the summer.” Enough people for a volleyball game at least. Junior history major Matt Boden said that he and his friends played “massive amounts of volleyball.” To get a group together required more effort than a regular semester. Junior economics major Ryan Sewell said, “The people that stay in Belton over summer are here for two reasons—to work and take classes. It is hard to hang out with a group of people since we all have different schedules.” Sewell worked at the Weigh Station over the summer, a college hot spot for frozen yogurt during the regular year. He spent the minimester studying abroad in Peru with the College of Business. “I qualified for free summer housing,” he said. “I decided to stay and find a job for the rest of the summer.” The summer incentive program allows residents to live in summer housing rent free if they take and complete a minimum of six course hours. There are three summer sessions: May minimester, Summer I and Summer II. Boden worked as the resident assistant for Independence Village and was one of four RAs. Boden said, “In June, I knocked out my classes.” July and August gave him time to focus on his music. When he started the summer, Boden had four incomplete songs that he was working on. “I ended up finishing a lot and writing two new (songs) while I was here … and I started recording,” he said. Belton is a town that is smaller than the shadow of a large Texas city, yet it has its own rhythm. Salley, a native Houstonian, has begun to appreciate the city in his two years at UMHB. He said, “You really see the spirit of Belton.” Sally spent his free time fishing and enjoying his church community. “You really do find interesting things to do,” he said. He attends Disciple Church, and his life group played a big part in helping him to have what he called a successful summer. “It’s hard spiritually...

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