Shaping students through apprenticeships

Students are now able to receive even more hands-on job experience thanks to the Belton Apprenticeship Program. The program began in January 2012 and has been off to a good start. Since the program is fairly new, the team is still learning what works for the students and what they can do better next time. Programs Director for the Belton Area Chamber of Commerce Mark Arrazola said the apprenticeship is for one semester. “The length could expand in the future. With this being the first class, there is still plenty to review and discuss to help build and develop the program more,” Arrazola said. “The primary objective of  program activities is for the mentor to guide the student on career development, help them make contacts and networks in Belton and beyond and offer workplace and community awareness.” The program first began with an idea from Billy Moyer of SOS leadership institute. Arrazola said, “He  had developed Apprentice Austin and told us about it….We knew instantly that we had to do a similar program for our area. After a few meetings with Billy and UMHB, the program was              developed.” For those interested in entering the program, the process is simple. Arrazola said, “Students pick up applications from the Career Services Office on campus, fill it out and return it. The applications are then taken to the chamber for review after the deadline, and the class is selected.” Some participants may wonder if they already have internships, what the difference is between internships and apprenticeships. “Apprenticeships offer the students more insight and the ability to get one on one with a person in the field they want to go into. The apprentice sets the terms of what they want to get out of the mentoring relationship and are able to have more say in what they will want to do in the program,” Arrazola said. “In an internship, the intern is given a set of tasks to do and may not get to ever be one on one with someone who could really give them insights and pointers about their future career. An internship also may not offer up the opportunity to build one’s network in the business area.” The program has a diverse mixture of people from different career paths. Executive Director, soon to be Director of Patient Services  at Body of Christ Clinic Carolyn Insall, was approached by officials of the Belton Chamber of Commerce. They asked if she would be willing to mentor a UMHB student who was interested in starting a free women’s clinic. She said, “We see medical and dental services for the uninsured and under...

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Newly founded club expresses artistic outlets of writing
Apr24

Newly founded club expresses artistic outlets of writing

By Elissa Thompson Benjamin Franklin once said, “If you would not be forgotten as soon as you are dead, either write something worth reading or do things worth writing.” The university’s Writer’s Club is a new group of students who share the same passion: writing. President of the club and junior international business major Peter Jackson said he wants to give students access and awareness to opportunities near the campus. “A lot of our focus is off-campus, but as far as on campus, I guess the main thing is awareness. I would like for students to be aware of events that are happening and have the chance to network and to meet writers and editors,” he said. Jackson is a published author and owns his own publishing company, Stellar Sole Press. He has published two books, “Free the Poet” and “Fear the Truth.” The books can be purchased at the UMHB bookstore, Townsend Memorial Library and  libraries in local cities. The sponsor for the club is Assistant Professor of English Dr. Toby Coley. He said Jackson approached him about becoming the sponsor for the club at the beginning of last semester. “Being a creative writer in addition to my scholarly work, I took on the sponsorship with enthusiasm in the hopes that students at UMHB who wrote or wanted to write creatively would be encouraged to do so with a formal outlet,” Coley said. Junior nursing major and treasurer of the club Rodney Duckett said the organization is all about freedom of  expression. “The written word is the only word that never dies. It lives on,” he said. The club meets the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month at 4:30 p.m. in the library conference Room 107. Members share their poems and short stories. Senior psychology major and chaplain for the club Hannah Romo said, “It is a good way to listen to other people’s writing styles and perspectives since everyone has their own style.” The Writer’s Club is students sharing their hearts in the form of words. “I usually say that one of the ways to a person’s soul is through  either writing, art or music. Anything artistic,” Romo said. The club also helps students critique  their writing and experiment with new styles of writing. “It entices a person to come in where they can write freely and learn ways to improve their writing style or their writing techniques. We kind of play to strengths by improving their weaknesses,” Duckett said. He has been able to get out of his comfort zone and dabble a little in poetry. “It’s given me some freedom and some latitude to...

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Men’s fraternity makes musical debut
Apr24

Men’s fraternity makes musical debut

Before their Thursday night meetings begin, members of the fraternity bow their heads in prayer, a curious sight for a fraternity. Junior church music major and president of Phi Mu Alpha, Cameron Roucloux said, “We have a chaplain, and we open every meeting in prayer. We are committed to not only growing together as musical brothers, but as Christian brothers as well.” Without togas, carousing or carelessness, the group of 15 proceeds to the opening song, “Hail Sinfonia,” as voices of various pitch join together. Combining through differences sounds ironic, but it is the very heart of the group. “We have a wide variety (of members) from freshmen to juniors,” Roucloux said. “We have a good time, and we enjoy each other’s company.” Freshman biblical studies major James Williams, who is the fraternity chaplain, said, “It is a way for me to connect with the guys. To me, a choir is an image of the body of Christ because you are using a bunch of different skill sets and putting them together into a unified goal.” For that reason, Williams is glad that the fraternity came to fruition. Before its birth on the UMHB campus,    PMA was credited with a long history of musical and moral accomplishments. Created Oct. 6, 1898, at the New England Conservatory in Boston, Sinfonia—under the leadership of Ossian Everett Mills—was comprised of 13 boys to further their development as men and singers. Two years later the group became recognized as a national fraternity. The UMHB division became official in December. Since then, PMA has been growing and accepting more branches. “The faculty has been pushing to make this a place people want to come to and to make us competitive with other schools. Almost every major music school in the state and in the country has a chapter of Phi Mu Alpha. We thought this would be something to help with recruiting to say we have a chapter,” Roucloux said. He hopes the fraternity grows and said, “We would love to see anybody interested come out. You don’t have to be a music major, read music, or sing in a choir to be in Phi Mu Alpha.” Sophomore nursing major and historian Patrick Krone, who had limited music experience, said, “I know the term crescendo, and that’s about it, but I met some new friends, and it’s cool that I’ve been able to join and get involved.” Krone recognizes that he has progressed as a musician, and he enjoys the social side of the choir. Junior music composition major and vice president Tyler McMahon said PMA is on a good path because “it’s a...

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Man who brought Chick-fil-A cow to life visits UMHB
Apr24

Man who brought Chick-fil-A cow to life visits UMHB

As the audience took their seats in the Mayborn Campus Center, all eyes were glued on the celebrity of the day­­– McLane Lecture speaker Stan Richards, head of the Richards Group in Dallas. The program started with a brief introduction and a light history on the lectures. The business themed speeches have been presented by many professionals, including former President George H.W. Bush. It  took a surprise turn when University President Randy O’Rear mentioned a new award. Although this was not on the program, O’Rear felt it was appropriate to present an award called the John and Mary Hardin Visionary Leadership Award. This title was given because of the Hardin couple who rescued the University when it was in its deepest financial pit. They generously gave $100,000 donation, which is equivalent to $10.7 million today. O’Rear said, “They literally saved Mary Hardin-Baylor.” In like manner, Elizabeth and Drayton McLane Jr. have set a new record by giving the  largest single financial donation in UMHB history. Therefore, it is fitting that the McLanes be the first to recieve the award. After expressing  gratitude for the award, Drayton McLane Jr. introduced Richards. From there, Richards talked about his memorable journey through advertising. The executive has saved many businesses from failing. For instance, Fruit of the Loom was in the midst of bankruptcy when Richards and his team persisted in bringing back the Fruit of the Loom men. What are the results? A comedic commercial of men singing “You can’t over love your underwear.” Another very famous company is Motel 6. Richards transformed the stigma of a less than top-notch motel into a new perspective of comfort and cleanliness. One of his most popular campaigns is Chick-fil-A. As a result of the genius marketing technique known as the Chick-fil-A cows, the fast food chain began to see dramatic results. Richards said that McDonald’s individual stores have an average sale of $2 million. Chick-fil-A restaurants earn an average of $6 million, and that is strictly working six days with no dollar menus or discounts. As these are great marketing strategies and achievements for his company, they are not the things he is most proud of. At his company, he said, “No one has a title. It implies that some people are more important than others.” As a result, The Richards Group has a high employee retention rate and was voted one of the best places to work in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. From starting in his garage to being one of the top advertisers in America and having a company that has been named America’s best creative agency, Stan Richards has it all....

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Seniors paint years of memories
Apr24

Seniors paint years of memories

From oil painting to graphic design, seniors Ellen Buhrow,  Abigail Davidhizar and Alec MacLaughlin have been working throughout their college careers to create a display for their final exam. Their exhibit will run April 30 to May 5 in the Tyson Art Gallery on the second floor of the Townsend Library. Their college pilgrimage comes to a close with their last art exhibit on campus. “The senior exhibition is the capstone event for an art major. After four years, we expect that they put together a body of mature work based on their interests,” said Ted Barnes, dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts and who oversees the exhibitions every year. “I think you’ll see that it will be an interesting show.” Davidhizar is an art major with an emphasis in graphic design.  Because of her area of expertise, her work will range from wall-size murals she created for the new field house, to posters of the Miss UMHB Pageant last year. “I had to go back and, of course, tweak my work, but for the most part it’s been work that I’ve done throughout my classes, which is a relief when you think about doing all new work for a theme,” Davidhizar said. A cherished memory of her time at UMHB is the trip she  took to Paris last May. “My favorite part was just having a map in my hand and figuring out the city,” she said. Also exhibited will be Mac Laughlin’s digital graphic design work. Presenting alongside them is Buhrow, who created a series of paintings about love. Her idea was to capture the emotion between couples. “All of my work is of either engaged or married couples arranged in a way that you can see the intimacy in their eyes or in their touch. I also wanted to take it to another level with older couples who have passed that stage of being in love, but they still have that connection,” Buhrow said. Although she is recently engaged, she insists this had nothing to do with the theme she chose. “My fiance and I have been dating for three and a half years, so he’s been with me through the entire series. I didn’t think about it specifically, but I think that did help me understand what those couples were feeling,” she said. After graduation, Buhrow wants to become an art professor, hoping to glorify God through her work. She said, “It’s my favorite thing to be down in the middle of the night working on a painting. I think that has a lot to do with the support system that the...

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5-K Cru for a Cause: Race against human trafficking

Human trafficking is a serious global issue  most people do not like to think happens in the U.S., especially in Texas. In hopes of fighting these inhumane transactions, the resident assistants at Beall joined with Freedom Youth Project of San Antonio to raise money to help these trafficking victims through a 5-K race April 14. Every year, the Beall RAs vote on several causes to raise awareness for through a 5-K run called Cru for a Cause.Last year, cancer was the chosen one, but human trafficking prevailed this year. “I feel strongly about this cause because a lot of people think of it as a foreign issue. No one knows it’s right next door,” Resident Director Christan Hammonds said. “There have even been girls rescued from Killeen, and it keeps growing.” All of the university was invited to participate, and even a Kid-K was held after the main race. One hundred percent of the proceeds went to the Freedom Youth Project in San Antonio. Placing second in the race was junior exercise and sport science major Aaron Miller. He likes the races because they are local and  he can run with his friends. He tries to participate every year except last year due to an injury. “I’ve always made it a point to race in the on-campus races to be a part of the school,” Miller said. “I don’t want to do it just so I can go fast. I want to do it for the right reasons.” The race began at Mayborn, wrapped throughout the campus to the overpass bridge then ended back at Mayborn. Bounce  houses, face painting, bake sales, a silent auction and donation booths were present to help raise money for the cause. “I would always love for there to be more, but it was a good turnout, and there were a lot of people cheering them on,” Hammonds said. The 5-K event along with the booth’s donations raised a total of $3,000. There were 78 running participants for the 5-K and about 10 for the Kid-K. Finishing in tenth place was sophomore pre-physical therapy major Zack Bailey. “It was a great feeling knowing that we were running for a good cause,” Bailey said. In the United States, there are 15,000 to 18,000 international victims per year who are smuggled or transported within the U.S. to be used in either forced labor or sex slavery. Human trafficking is a lot closer to home than most people would like to believe. With American-born 12 to 14 -year-old girls being high in demand, it is horrible to fathom that Texas is responsible for more than 20 percent...

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