Nurses give back through snacks
Sep11

Nurses give back through snacks

If you’re looking for a quick pick-me-up that will only costs you 50 cents, head over to the snack concession on the second floor of Davidson. Sponsored by the Nursing Student Association, the food stand serves a variety of goods, including soft drinks, popcorn, bottled water and candy. The NSA is an organization that offers opportunities for mentorship and leadership. It not only raises money for nursing conventions, but is a means to give back to the community and members hope someday to help future nursing students with financial aid. J2 nursing major Ana Barefield said, “Our organization seeks out fundraising opportunities that help us pay for nursing students’ costs for events such as Council of Schools where all the nursing schools in the state of Texas gather together for a meeting of the minds. Our organization also sends students to a Texas Nursing Students Association state convention in the spring where students serve as delegates to represent our university,” she said. She hopes that the students who serve will be provided with financial help. “We also hope to eventually be able to provide scholarships that are directly available to UMHB nursing students for books and other costs,” Barefield said. “That is still a work in progress.” S2 nursing major and president of NSA April Lee discussed how the association promotes several events throughout the semester. They include two bake sales and community activities done around the Temple area. “There are so many things we try to sponsor. Right now, we’re raising funds for the Arch of Bell County. We do a Valentine’s Day dance and Halloween dance with them. In the fall toward Christmas, we donate a Christmas tree to Meridian. It’s like a nursing home facility, and the tree is auctioned off and the funds support Alzheimer’s,”she said. NSA also sponsors the Girls Scouts Capstone event in the fall. Adviser of the organization and Professor of nursing Mary Ervi wants students to take on a more active role when it comes to serving the community and see the benefits of joining NSA. “You get some discounts on certain items and reviews for boards. We also provide educational resources for the students. What we like to tell students is that when you go for a job interview and you have on your resume that you were involved, or that you held a board position in the organization … That really looks nice on an application,” she said. Junior nursing major Brittany Haines is thrilled about her decision to become a part of the organization and the opportunities it provides. She said, “I joined because it is a tremendous...

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CruCash, power found in swipe
Sep11

CruCash, power found in swipe

Students living in the campus apartments got a nice surprise this semester. Each of them received a $100 allowance of CruCash preloaded onto their student ID cards. In the past, the cards served as keys into the apartments and check-in for chapel. The allowance is a new addition. Jessica Roush has worked as manager in the CruCard office for two years. Roush said that apartment dwellers will continue to receive $100 in CruCash each fall and spring semester. Students can spend this money in a variety of ways. “CruCash can be used at any location that accepts the CruCard,” Roush said. “A full list of locations is on the CruCard website.” Available for use both on and off campus, CruCash was introduced to UMHB last fall. The list of vendors catering to the system is constantly growing. “We are always reaching out to local merchants that we know students are interested in,” Roush said. Residents in the apartments enjoyed obtaining the $100 and are eager to use it this semester. Junior math education major Shangrila Pathak finds the allowance convenient. “I bought one of my books with it,” Pathak said. “I also ate at Gatti’s with it.” Junior exercise sport science major Bailey Burks is glad to see the university working with local businesses to make CruCash possible. “I love having CruCash,” she said. “We can use it on campus at the bookstore and the SUB, as well as off campus at certain places. I’ve already used some of mine.” Along with the $100, students can use their cards for discounts around town. Junior psychology and sociology double major AnnMarie Millican recently enjoyed putting hers to use. “I used it to buy a coffee,and I was happy. I also hear you can use your card on Tuesdays for special discounts at the movie theater,” she said. “I want to use it there, too.” When it comes to keeping their CruCard working properly, students do not need to worry about their cell phones interfering. “The magnetic stripe on the card is similar in strength to the one on your bank card,” Roush said. “The chances of your phone altering the state of your CruCard are slim.” Students can manage their CruCash and other aspects of the ID card on the new myCruCard website. “The myCruCard site is a new mobile-friendly site that allows students to manage everything on their cards,” Roush said. “It also allows students to see what locations accept CruCash and deposit funds directly onto their CruCard.” If students lose a card, they should report it lost through the website to deactivate it. For other questions and information,...

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New theater, grand expectations
Aug21

New theater, grand expectations

By Antonio Hebert Since its opening this past May, Grand Avenue Theaters has been a big hit with Belton area residents and UMHB students. Boasting six large fully digital screens, a cafe and vintage soda parlor, the theater offers a long-awaited and convenient venue for entertainment. Prior to the announcement of the theater’s construction, many thought a movie theater was a service that Belton needed. Business manager Daniel Bucher, a UMHB alumnus, said, “The community has been really pleased. We have gotten so many comments about how they can’t believe this is finally here and how we have needed this for a long time.” A large number of people in Belton would travel to places like Temple, Killeen, Waco or Austin to take in a movie. Ironically, residents of many Central Texas towns now drive to Belton for a movie. David Leigh, the theater’s acting general manager, said, “We are having a positive response from neighboring communities with people coming from Killeen, Gatesville, Waco and Austin.” Aside from native Central Texans, another sector of Belton’s population is happy to have a new theater, the UMHB student body. Many have been to the theater multiple times and are pleased with its convenient location and the five dollar college day begining Tuesday, Aug. 21. Junior nursing major Taylor Frank was present at the theater’s midnight opening on May 5, the same night The Avengers premiered. She was impressed. She said, “I think it’s perfect for the small town of Belton. The workers were just so nice. I had a great time.” Associate Dean of Students and Director of Residence Life Donna Plank arranged an outing to the theater to see The Bourne Legacy. Plank said, “Belton has needed this for a long time, and I am glad someone finally realized that UMHB students are a large population of people who need things like this right here in Belton and not just in Temple or Austin or Killeen.” Plank said that more than 70 people attended with her group. She was impressed with how well the staff handled themselves. “It was great. The theater owner worked with us to make getting in as a group very easy, and we were able to sit together as a group.” She said the group enjoyed their experience and plan to return. Two resident assistants who were present for the event were junior accounting major Seth Michaelson and sophomore communication major Wesley Ashton. Michaelson, a resident assistant in Getty’s Hall, said, “The theater was super clean, and it even smelled nice. The seats were comfy, and the screen was the perfect distance away.” Ashton, the head...

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Rec Plex causes spike in student life
Aug21

Rec Plex causes spike in student life

By Katelyn Holm The sounds of jackhammers and concrete mixers welcome change and growth on campus this year. A relocated and reinvented Rec Center joins the list of newly completed Cru construction. The building, situated between the intramural fields and residence halls, features both new equipment and recreation opportunities. Dubbed the Rec Plex, the building sits alongside three sand volleyball courts, two basketball courts and two tennis courts. Director of campus recreation Sue Weaver shared her enthusiasm for the facility. “We are really excited about the new Rec Plex. It’s a great location because we are in the heart of all the residence halls. We have increased the amount and variety of equipment that you can check out on your own or as a group.” In the future, Weaver hopes that students will initiate sporting events rather than relying solely on organized activities. “There doesn’t have to be formal recreation going on. Students can make their own activities.” “We are adding more outdoor equipment as well, like tents and camping stoves, even life vests for trips to the lake.” Because the courts are open for use at all hours, students just swipe their Cru cards for access to the facility and lights. This addition encourages students to initiate games and activities outside of intramurals, which many students have already taken advantage of. Even new Crusaders have expressed their enthusiasm for the expansion. Freshman computer science major Riley Massey said, “It’s really exciting to hear about the new improvements being made on campus. It’s especially nice to have improvements to things that we use a lot, like the courts. With all of these changes, I am really looking forward to intramurals.” Intramurals kick off with flag football and Spike Fest, both of which can be registered for online, a change that should make registration less difficult. Starting this fall, all sign-ups for organized intramural sports will be done through imleagues.com. With the link on the Rec Center page, this method will be easier and more convenient for students and the rec staff. Weaver explains the short process. “To sign up for a sport, all members of a team must go the website and create a free account. It is really simple. The hardest thing about it is taking that five minutes to create an account.” But even with the additions to campus, some Crusaders find it hard to say goodbye. Sophomore business major Charlie Rod reminisced. “The old outdoor courts held a special spot for me. My first year at UMHB, I made so many great memories on the basketball, volleyball and tennis courts. It was a bit disappointing seeing...

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Core curriculum prepares students

While continued construction is a reminder of physical transformations on campus, an academic change is also taking place with the start of the semester. A revised core curriculum is being introduced, which will increase the number of required courses in the core for all new students who receive an undergraduate degree. Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Steve Oldham said the new core is comprised of the courses that the faculty and university believe are necessary for a basic education, regardless of a student’s major. “Mary Hardin-Baylor is committed to a broad-based education, so when we ask ourselves, ‘What does broad based mean for us?,’ that’s what a core is about,” he said. “It’s making sure those basic things are accomplished. It’s a broad-based education that prepares all of our students for a very complex world.” Associate Professor of Biology Dr. Cathleen Early, who has been heavily involved with the new curriculum, said it will go into effect starting this semester. “All new students from this point forward, both transfer and freshman, who start at UMHB this fall under the 2012-2013 catalog, or later, will be required to follow the new curriculum,” she said. “Returning students will still follow the catalog that was in place when they enrolled, so long as they graduate within six years of that catalog going into effect.” With a total of 46 semester hours, the new core curriculum is larger than the previous one and has some significant additions. Some of the major changes include an increase in the math and science fields. All undergraduates will now need seven hours of science, and every student will have to take at least one math class. Oldham said, “We think that it’s really important in our age of technology and information explosion that students have an understanding of science and math.” A literature class will also be a requirement; however, Oldham said the English department has expanded its course offerings to include a wider variety of options. “While students now have to take a literature course they may have not otherwise taken, we hope it will be something they enjoy and is meaningful to them,” he said. In addition, three semester hours of fine arts will be required, and students will have to attend one fine arts experience each semester. These events on campus are specifically designated by the College of Visual and Performing Arts as FAEs. Oldham said, “We think the arts are really important for our own flourishing as believers. We believe God is creator. He’s created beautiful things and given us the ability.” Throughout the process of designing the core...

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Missionaries paint world purple and gold
Aug21

Missionaries paint world purple and gold

In his book “Oh, The Places You’ll Go!”, Dr. Suess describes the journey of a young man off to make waves with his life—to take in the sights. Over the summer, many students went out on journeys of their own, not to “be seeing great sights!”, but to “join the high fliers who soar to high heights.” The short-term missionaries joined a long list of those who have painted the world purple and gold as they covered the globe to spread the gospel. On nearly every continent, they took part in summer missions—to serve God, to love others and to enlarge their own spiritual muscles. Through cheers and trials, God led the Crusader missionaries. Sophomore English education major Haley Higbee served in Nairobi and Mombasa, Kenya, with Young Life Expeditions. In the beginning, the team, comprised of two Crusaders (Higbee and sophomore environmental chemistry and business administration double major Ryan Sewell) and students from other universities, was faced with a challenged. “Getting there was definitely God teaching me to trust in him the most,” Higbee said. “We ended up missing our connecting flight in Miami to Paris, and it put us a day behind.” After further delays, the group wasn’t able to fly out of Paris until six p.m. the next day. By that time, they were supposed to be in Kenya. Once they arrived in Kenya, more trouble loomed. “In that process, I ended up losing my luggage and didn’t get it back until two days after we got back in America,” she said. The team had also lost some money bags, which were intended as donations. “It was really just God teaching me those are just worldly possessions. The people didn’t care what clothes we wore or what we looked like. They were fine with us just being there to love on them and build relationships with them.” Higbee remains connected with members of her team and those she served through social media like Facebook. “I definitely made lasting relationships; I never bonded with a group of people so fast. Africans are all about relationships. They just want you to be there and to be with them, to talk to them and get to know them.” She also found solace in her teammates once she faced the difficulty of readjusting to life at home. “I talk to them every day. It’s nice to have that fellowship in that I can call them and say ‘I’m really struggling with this. How I can I deal with it better?’” Communicating is essential on missions. Whether it be to a team, to Jesus, or in witnessing, it is crucial that...

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