Campus crowns Miss MHB 2016
Nov19

Campus crowns Miss MHB 2016

Heels, ball gowns, and a tiara were all part of the annual Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor pageant that took place in Walton Chapel on Nov. 6 and 7. The event gave 26 girls representing 26 different campus organizations the opportunity to showcase their talents and be a voice for a cause they are passionate about. “Pageant is really focused on the girls building relationships together and with God. This year we focused a lot on how each girl is beautiful and flawless through Jesus Christ,” said senior elementary education major Rachel Correale, who directed the event. “This experience also grows the contestant as a person.” This year’s pageant featured a variety of talents, from stand-up comedy to spoken word to storytelling using henna and the reciting of favorite childhood books. “I have always had a love of the book The Giving Tree, so one day I sat down and prayed about it being my talent,” senior speech communication major and first runner-up Katie Stringer said. “Then next thing I knew I had a whole monologue about the ultimate gift we can receive – Jesus Christ.” Stringer was given the award for Miss Congeniality at the end of the show, which was a special award voted on by Stringer’s fellow contestants. Winning that award held great sentimental value to Stringer and her late mother. “When I won Miss Congeniality, I felt so honored and shocked. I cannot even express in words how much receiving that award meant to me,” Stringer said. “I told my mother when I was a little girl that I would one day be just like Sandra Bullock in my favorite movie and become Miss Congeniality. These wonderful new friends have graciously helped me achieve that dream.” After other special awards such as Best Gown and Best Talent were given out, it was time to announce the winner. Everyone stood and cheered as sophomore music major Karon Chapa was crowned Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor 2016. “A lot of people don’t know how vulnerable we are during practice and Karon was so encouraging when we needed her, and then I had the opportunity to see her true heart as I watched and listened to her platform,” freshman nursing major and Miss Freshman Class Mercedes Saldivar said. “I’m just super excited for her and can’t wait to see how she goes about using her platform.” Chapa has a heart for special needs families and hopes to use her reign as Miss MHB to bridge the gap between the UMHB community and the special needs community by educating students about everything. Chapa hopes to get students involved in special needs-based clubs on...

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University adds historic home
Nov19

University adds historic home

It’s big. It’s red. And it’s a new addition to the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor campus. The Curtis Mansion, also known as the Miller-Curtis House, was built in 1902 by William Ray Miller and his wife Ida. The house was built after the good cotton years left the family wealthy. In its architecture, Queen Anne features are mingled with Shingle style, which were popular in the eastern U.S. during that time. The design included fireplaces in every room. Fine materials and detailing inside and out gave elegance to the structure, according to uncoveredtexas.com. In 1914, A. Lon and Cora (Lee) Curtis acquired the property. For the next 59 years, the Curtis family occupied the mansion, thus earning the name of the “Curtis Mansion.” In 1977, The Curtis House became an official historical landmark, and received a medallion and plate on site. The recent owners, Richard and Pat Dale, former UMHB alumni, have owned the house for over 30 years. Dr. Steve Theodore, Senior Vice President for Administration & Chief Operating Officer, said UMHB has maintained a good relationship with the Dale family over the years. “It’s a beautiful home, and they’ve kept it immaculate…it’s in great shape, even for an old home” When the Dale family decided it was finally time to put the house up for sale, UMHB jumped at the chance to own the home in September of 2015. But despite the university’s eagerness to own the property, there aren’t any big plans for the house quite yet. Theodore said the University felt it was important, given the location, to purchase it. “We’re looking forward to doing something with it. We want to keep the house and keep it in its beautiful condition, and show it off. It’s a great place.” Several years ago, a cluster of rooms were renovated in the Curtis Mansion, but overall it still needs some work. “The house will need some upgrades like the air conditioning and probably a new roof. We’ve got some work to do to the house, but it’s a beautiful home.” As UMHB prepares to work in the Curtis Mansion, they know that changes will need to be made in order to make it appropriate for University usage. “As we use it for an institutional building, we’ll have to get it ADA (American Disability Act) compliant,” Theodore said. “We’ll have to have ramps, or possibly an elevator.” Students and those who grew up in the area are excited to see the building become a campus facility. “As a child, my siblings and I would always talk about living in the house and what it would be like.” said...

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International students adjust to new culture
Oct29

International students adjust to new culture

The international student population at UMHB is at an all-time high. Currently, international students make up around 10 percent of the student body, with the majority of these students enrolled in graduate studies. Many of these students are from India or China. Junior Computer Information Systems major, Bei Lui, is one of these students. She is from Beijing, China and has enjoyed assimilating to Texas culture. “My favorite thing has been the Texas barbecue, especially from Texas Roadhouse,” Lui said. But despite her love of all things Texas, it can be difficult learning new customs and culture. Lui said UMHB International Student Services has made the transition much easier. “They are very helpful with everything that allows me to stay here,” she said. “They also answer any questions I may ask.” The International Services office works one-on-one with International students in nearly every way possible. They act as academic advisors for the international students, and make time each semester to work with graduating international students. “If a student wants a driver’s license, wants to move off campus, or find a job, we help them look for one. We help them with anything they may need as long as it is within their student visa,” said Dr. Elizabeth Tanaka, director of International Student Services. “Also, for the first few weeks we have a couple of vans that run to the store and other places so they can get adjusted.” While international students are attending UMHB, many of them find employment on campus. Shortly after arriving here, Lui became a student worker in the Mayborn Campus Center. Even though she has only worked there for a short time, she has already made an impact on the students she works with. “I like working with Bei because she is fun to talk to which helps the shifts pass by,” said junior history major, Kelsey Riegel. “But I like Bei because she is sassy, goofy and Bei is Bei.” Communicating and relating to other students helps international students assimilate to US college life, and want to come back year-after-year. International students have come to love UMHB so much that the population has grown considerably over the years. “We have had as little as 12 [International] students and it has been as high as 400 [International] students at one time,” Tanaka said. Other than speaking with other internationals who have attended UMHB before, one of the most effective ways to communicate with an International student has been the university’s website. “The website is very International friendly,” Tanaka said. “They stay away from words that may seem common here in United States. Instead of saying...

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Week reflects on missionaries’ stories
Oct29

Week reflects on missionaries’ stories

Missionaries who are serving all over the world converged on campus Oct. 19-23 during Missions Emphasis Week. The week included events and seminars whose purpose was to connect missionaries and students. One of these seminars was called “Latte for the Lord” and was led by Susan and Kelly Curry. In 1996, the Currys created a coffee shop called An Tobar Nua in Galway, Ireland. They were nicknamed ‘The Jesus people’ by the locals and have worked hard to create relations with the people of Galway. “They didn’t trust us for a long time… they thought we were a cult. They thought we were going to pull them away from the Catholic Church,” Kelly Curry had said, “In the beginning it was so slow and we played monopoly in the afternoon because no one was there.” Kelly told a story of how a woman had come to them with her husband who was suffering from depression. The couple had taken a three-hour bus ride to get to the coffee shop, where they were prayed over by the staff for at least an hour. After three weeks Kelly called to check up on the man and found out that after 11 years his depression broke on the bus ride home. Junior Elementary Education major Beth Ann Earley was particularly moved by the Curry’s story and said she knows mission work is in her future. “I personally feel called to missions. I have always found other cultures interesting and there are so many human rights needs around the world,” Early said. “People don’t have the things that we have and we can do something about it.” The missionaries were also invited to speak to classes throughout the week. A young missionary spoke to Sara Billingsley’s literature class, and the junior Christian studies major was inspired by what he said. “[The missionary] graduated from UMHB and he came and talked about his Journeyman term. He served in Nepal and worked on sharing the gospel to unreached people groups,” Billingsley said, “It was encouraging to meet someone who graduated from UMHB who decided to commit to mission work. It was nice to get some advice on that kind of stuff.” Baptist Student Ministry Director Shawn Shannon said MEW raises awareness about the need, opportunity, purposefulness, and joy of missions. “We pray for missionaries to be in transforming conversations that help others connect their personal vocations,” she said. “We seek opportunities for missionaries to engage in relationships with students, staff, faculty, and local churches.” Some of the events on campus were the glow run, girls/boys night out, coffee house, the world market, and the prayer...

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BSM celebrates 95 years of serving UMHB
Oct14

BSM celebrates 95 years of serving UMHB

Ninety-five years ago, the 19th Amendment was passed, allowing women to vote, the American Professional Football League was formed, and the first ever Baptist Student Union in Texas was established at Baylor Female College. In 1920 the University of Mary-Hardin Baylor was chosen as the “laboratory” for the first BSU in Texas because of its roots in Christian faith and service. UMHB has always focused on the idea of teaching not only the knowledge found in books, but the knowledge found in knowing God. This is apparent in the 1945 Centennial Series: According To His Purpose. “During the past one hundred years… the college, and the student body itself have been concerned with ‘including the Christian religion within, and not just alongside of the educational process,’” according to the series. The University’s mission served as the foundation for organizations such as the Mission Circle, Women’s Ministry Union, Student Christian Association, Young Woman’s Auxiliary, and the Baptist Student Union. The name Baptist Student Union, however, was changed to the Baptist Student Ministry in 1994 to better describe the purpose of the organization. Despite this name change, the goal of the BSM has remained very much the same since its beginning in 1920. “[The BSU] has its object in the winning of others to Christ and His Church; the enlistment of Christians in Bible and Mission study… the calling out of the called for special service,” 1920 Student Secretary Joseph P. Boone said in a 1940s pamphlet about the ministry. Today the BSM offers over 20 ministries that impact the students as well as the community surrounding our campus. BSM director Shawn Shannon believes that the constant growth and change of the BSM is what has made it such a driving force on campus. “This is my 36th year in campus ministry. My 16th at UMHB. UMHB is a precious place. I am convinced that we can touch the world from here,” she said. Shannon is thankful her time here on campus and the opportunities it has provided for ministry. “The campus is a strategic place and the college season of life is crucial for making significant decisions… and what an incubator the campus is for relationships. What an important time to pursue Christ with others and for the sake of others,” Shannon said. It’s this passion for ministry that has inspired many students on campus to get involved with the BSM, including senior interdisciplinary studies education major Rebekah Peyton. “There is such an amazing peace in knowing that I am joined together in my UMHB experience with other students who are trying to follow Christ, lead ministries, and also be...

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SGA hopes to have big impact on campus policy
Oct06

SGA hopes to have big impact on campus policy

Student Government Association representatives recently met for the first time this semester to indoctrinate new members and brainstorm about ways to improve the student experience on campus. The organization had many new ideas at this first session because of an influx of fresh faces. “The only people that are returning senate members are those on the executive cabinet and then one or two of the other senate members. So we have a fresh senate; they’re still learning how everything works,” External Vice President Kirstie Wallace said. Despite many being new to SGA, the senate members are ready and excited to bring their ideas of change to the table. “SGA is not just about pushing agendas, but rather representing the 3000 students that attend UMHB,” Freshman Class President Tyler Baker said. “It is the only club at school that can have a direct effect on policy. I joined because I wanted to be involved in helping make our school even better.” Getting involved and listening to classmates is exactly what the members are doing. At the SGA meeting on Sept. 22, the senate members threw out many ideas that had been brought to them by fellow students. One of these ideas was inspired by a concern about the sun glare from the windows on the first floor of the Student Union Building, as well as in Mayborn Campus Center. “I propose getting blinds where the computers are in the SUB. It’s really bright and you can’t see the screen if you’re using the computers,” senior Senator Collin Cavendish said. “[I propose] possibly getting blinds and fans in Mayborn as well.” Another issue SGA hopes to address has to do with parking restrictions. Students have mentioned that commuters are being allowed to park in residential parking spots at all times, but residents are only allowed to park in commuter parking spaces after 2:30 p.m. Freshman cell biology with clinical lab science major, Bryanna Edwards, agrees with this issue and has expressed her frustration with the lack of parking spots closer to residential and academic buildings, and the competition this has led to. “As a Remschel resident there is very little parking. We are always competing with Stribling residents and other students for parking spots by the dorm. I know commuters take lots of residential spots as well because there isn’t enough commuter parking either. It’s just a constant competition for spots,” she said. Other ideas mentioned during the meeting were a return of the Homecoming 5K, a Day of Culture, and benches to provide seating at the bus stops. The association also voted to nominate sophomore Treasurer Jake Fereday as the...

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