Creativity inspires original team names
Mar06

Creativity inspires original team names

Whether it is intramural flag football, volleyball, basketball or a campus recreation dodge ball tournament, there are sure to be some teams with out-of-the-box names. Basketball is the intramural sport taking place now, and team names range from the Chinchillas, to the White Mambas, to No Game This Week, to the Post-Docs. To eliminate inappropriate names and  maintain clean fun, all team names are now reviewed before being confirmed into the league through imleagues.com. “We’ve had to take a stricter line on what’s an allowable team name and what’s not,” Director of Campus Recreation Sue Weaver said. “Anything that has negative undertones… we try to keep away from those.” However, that has not kept students from coming up with creative names. Weaver said that most students “just want a fun, interesting name that will make them stand out.” Each name has a story behind it that in some way reflects the team itself. For example, junior nursing major Taylor Frank tells the story behind the name of her intramural team. “It started when we got a group of friends together to play soccer last semester, and we were down to the deadline to make up a name and get it all together,” she said. “My boyfriend, Chase Covington, wrote the first thing that popped into his head. Everyone ended up loving it, and decided that now every intramural team we have, we’ll be the fighting Chinchillas.” The Chinchillas show the fun side of the often competitive intramural sports scene. “The name is important because it represents what we’re all about, just having fun,” Frank said. “I think it’s one of the least intimidating names you can get, but it amuses us and gets us excited. It also adds to the team spirit.” Another team, that consists of four members of the men’s golf team, named its basketball team the White Mambas. This was a nickname for former NBA player Brian Scalabrine that jokingly compared him to Kobe Bryant. Junior exercise and sport science major Justin Judkins said their name is a tribute to Scalabrine. However, students are not the only ones getting creative. A group of professors have their own original team name with specific meaning. “We picked our name based on a play of words,” exercise  and sport science instructor Dr. Jason Reese said. “There are two meanings here: The first meaning… is that everyone on our team has their doctorate in something. So our name came from this fact, plus the basketball terminology to ‘post-up’. Hence the name Post-Doc.” Weaver encourages students to create an imleagues.com account so that they can know about upcoming events. “We need...

Read More

Clubs partner to spread ‘amor’

By Ashleigh Bugg Valentine’s Day can be a beautiful experience for happy couples and Hallmark stores but can leave others with a bitter taste in their mouths that has nothing to do with dark chocolate. Students from the Campus Activities Board wanted to make the holiday a positive event for students, regardless of their relationship status. CAB members passed out buttons with a simple message: “You are loved.” “Not everyone has another person to be with or can be with the person they love today,” junior education major and CAB member Jess Hoerman said.  “We want everyone to feel loved.” The idea is based on the group You Are Loved, an organization dedicated to sharing the story of Jesus Christ through buttons. The purpose of the pins is simple: to remind others that they are valued and get them to think about why. The organization was founded in 2006 by Dave Navarra, a high school senior at the time. 55,000 pins have been produced and distributed throughout the world. The mission is to spread as much love as possible to people from all walks of life. The website promises three free pins to everyone who sends an envelope with their mailing address. Navarra makes the point on his website that the pins themselves are not there to “love” anyone but to remind Christians to follow Christ’s commands and start conversations. “I didn’t celebrate Valentine’s with anyone this year. It really made me smile to know that CAB cared,” sophomore psychology student Amy Valenta said. “We want everyone on campus to know this is all inclusive and that they are loved,” Hoerman said. CAB wasn’t the only organization to play cupid this year. The Spanish Club sold chocolates with Spanish verses to raise money for their upcoming trip to the Riverwalk and  the Alamo. “Each chocolate has a message in English and Spanish. It’s folded kind of like a fortune cookie,” junior nursing student Rachel Love said. Students bought chocolate with the usual Valentine’s greetings such as “I love you” and “You’re beautiful.” However, some cards had more unusual sayings. Sophomore nursing student Sarah Patty picked a verse that said, “Mariposo de sueno, te pareces a mi alma,” or “Dream butterfly, you look like my soul.” She said, “Forget valentines, I’m buying this one for my roommate.” Spanish club members were eager to show that Valentine’s Day is more than a holiday for love-struck couples. In various Latin American countries, including Costa Rica and Colombia, the holiday is not only for couples. It is known as Día del Amor y la Amistad translated the Day of Love and Friendship. Floral...

Read More

Chapel service kicks off Lent for students

By Paola Nunez On the day that marks the beginning of Lent, known as Ash Wednesday, the Catholic Student Organization gave students a look inside this largely Catholic tradition during chapel Feb. 13. “There are a lot of things that it commemorates,” sophomore psychology major and organization member Michelle Lopez said. “Forty is an important number in the Bible. It stands for the 40 years of the Jews in the desert, Jesus’ 40 days of temptation in the desert, and now it’s the 40 days that we wait before Easter. Those are the biggest three that are always talked about.” Lent is the 40-day period of fasting and repentance considered to be preparation for the celebration of Easter and is a custom practiced by many Christians aside from Catholics, including Anglicans and Lutherans. The majority of individuals commonly know it to be the time when they give up something that they depend on every day, or that they enjoy or consume regularly, but there is more to the  tradition than that. Graduate education major and member of CSO Angelica Villafuerte said, “For me, it’s not always about giving something up, but trying to add something to your routine that will make you closer to God.” She said this can vary from trying to read excerpts from the Bible more often or setting aside more time for prayer each day. The video presented at the beginning of chapel illustrated Galatians 2:20, the scripture the organization used to base their meaning of Lent to the students. It describes the way one should act and what to remember during the days leading up to Easter. It reads, “I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me; and the life I now live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God who loved me and gave Himself for me.” Deacon Ronnie Lastivica from Christ the King Catholic Church joined the organization at chapel and during the homily, when the Gospel reading is explained, he said, “What Christ really wants from us is our hearts…. He wants us to be able to go out and be willing to love other people, as He has loved us, so much that we are willing to sacrifice ourselves for love of Him, and for love of God.” He gave the reason why people give up something important and try to grow spiritually during Lent: the sacrifice signifies the resolve to give oneself to God, as Jesus gave Himself. Senior nursing major and club president Keenan Mullins said, “I think a lot of people...

Read More

SGA elections bring on presidential debate

Election season is back. Candidates are campaigning and social media is buzzing. Why again so soon? Because UMHB is about to elect a new student body president. The current one, Kassidy Harris, will graduate this spring after a two-year administration, leaving a void that needs to be filled. Tiffany Wurdemann, who has been the student organizations director and adviser to the Student Government Association for the past year and half looks forward to working through this transition for the first time. Wurdemann takes the work the organization does seriously and believes its members are influential on campus. She said, “In my opinion, they are like the leaders of the leaders. They’re supposed to represent the school …, We have an eclectic group of students and they come, and they feel the weight of the responsibility they have, and so when they come in, they’re voicing what they’ve heard on the street….” Wurdemann has high hopes for SGA’s future and is encouraged by the progress the organization has made in recent months. She said, “Last year SGA had about one bill go through..This year in the beginning we had like 15 we were working on … and then three ended up being retired because the administration just took them on, so we didn’t have to make it into a proper bill.” Wurdemann wishes both candidates the best. She is also felt sympathy for the tensions they felt during the debate. She said, “I think with any debate, there’s that pressure. You’re being watched. One question can stir people’s opinions. I feel for those candidates. I would not want to be up there.”   A look at Each Candidate Collin Davies Collin Davies is a senior business and Spanish major who has been in SGA for a total of three semesters. He has served as a senator and a treasurer. Some of his accomplishments include helping make Veterans Day a campus holiday and procuring more bike racks for the apartment buildings in Independence Village. After receiving inspiration from conversations with previous SGA presidents and candidates, he decided to pursue a campaign even though he had originally intended to graduate at the end of the coming fall semester. If he is elected, he will stay and graduate in spring of 2014 to fulfill the two-semester term requirement. Regarding his reasons for running, Davies said, “I’m rather relational … so my platform would hinge off of my connectedness. I think success in being student body president is not found in my ability to accomplish things as an individual, but rather my ability to give the power to the student body….” Among the aspects...

Read More
Student turns professional contest winner
Feb15

Student turns professional contest winner

After sitting in her car for more than nine hours, Jessica Pitcaithly waited not so patiently for “You and Tequila” by Kenny Chesney to play over the airwaves, cueing the beginning of a radio competition. Her call into the station that day began a winning streak that sparked a contest addiction. The freshman marketing major has entered hundreds of radio contests since she began in May 2012. In only 10 months, she has won eight major contests to a variety of well-known country concerts. Pitcaithly has seen Rascal Flatts, Luke Bryan, Jason Aldean, Tim McGraw, Kenny Chesney, Toby Keith and more than 10 other musicians, all completely free. “We listened to the radio a lot. After many times of trying, my sister and I were calling in… and the prize was ZiegenBock music festival. I got through, and we won…. When we heard our voices on air, we wanted to keep doing it,” Jessica said. The competitive spirit runs in the family. Jessica’s mom, Jennifer Pitcaithly, also entered similar contests when she was 16, though she never won. Now, it’s something the family discusses frequently. Jessica said, “My mom is supportive of it. She doesn’t have to buy me tickets anymore. One time, I got my whole family to play…. I’ve basically won every contest I wanted by doing the same things.” This success comes with a strategy. Jessica has developed a method for each challenge, depending on whether callers or texters receive the prize. First, she recommends doing research on the radio station before attempting to enter any sweepstakes. “By knowing what times to play, what song is the cue, what word you need to text or how often you can enter, you can be prepared and have the best chances,” she said. Secondly, she recommends using different phones, depending on the radio’s guidelines. “iPhones and smartphones are best for texting. You can copy and paste the winning word more quickly for a greater probability of winning… but don’t use more than one device. When you do that, you are basically playing against yourself.” When the lines are busy, Jessica encourages people to keep trying. “The more simple your phone is for calling, the better chances you have. You can just call and redial multiple times. If you don’t get through the first time, it doesn’t mean they have chosen someone already. For the most part, there are just a lot of callers, and no one has gotten through yet,” she said. On one occasion, she received a special surprise. “On Waco100, they were doing a $50,000 giveaway with a Ford F-150 truck…. It was sort of like...

Read More

Gun control, Second Amendment turn into national, local debate

In the wake of the recent wave of mass shootings, heated arguments and new proposed firearms legislation are breeding controversy that has Americans fired up. This time of grief conjures up memories of a horrific scene that unfolded more than two decades ago only a few miles from UMHB’s campus. For many people outside of Texas, the event that turned a Luby’s Cafeteria into a war zone put Killeen on the national map and was a catalyst for allowing concealed carry of firearms in Texas and other states. On Oct. 16, 1991, George Hennard of Belton drove his truck through a window of the restaurant, exited the vehicle and began shooting with a Glock 17 pistol. When the gunfire ceased, 23 people were dead and 27 injured. He apparently turned his gun on himself in the restaurant’s bathroom. Pastor Jimmy Towers of Killeen’s Lifeway Fellowship Church was nearby. “I was actually in the parking lot when people were breaking out of the back window of Luby’s to escape. I’d been speaking at a hotel next door. I was on my way to conduct a funeral, so I didn’t even realize what all had happened,” The attack was distinguished as the most deadly of its kind in U.S. history until the Virginia Tech massacre of 2007. Much like the recent shootings in Newtown, Conn., and Aurora, Colo., the infamous cafeteria mass murder caused Americans to unite and rethink firearm policies. Although the Central Texas community was dealt a tough blow, from the tragedy arose an effective gun rights advocate. Towers said, “Some of the people became very proactive after the event like Suzanna Gratia Hupp from Cove, the chiropractor who was one of the primary people for passing legislation for concealed handguns in Texas.” Hupp was dining with her mother and father when shots rang out in 1991. She had left her pistol in her vehicle, not wanting to lose her chiropractor’s license for carrying a gun into a weapon-free zone. Surviving the rampage, she was able to crawl through a shattered window, and ran to retrieve her gun. She returned to find both of her parents among the fatally wounded. Hupp embarked on a mission to reform gun laws in the Texas legislature, where she served from 1996 to 2002. Even though Hupp is no longer in the legislature, she remains politically active and is scheduled to testify on gun control today in Washington. Hupp shares an opinion with many others who believe new proposed government regulations will infringe on their Second Amendment rights. “I think it’s incredibly hypocritical of Biden and Obama, when you see them and their...

Read More