Org Fair on King Street
Mar06

Org Fair on King Street

Christian Ministry major Morgan Ross (Left) and Nursing major Aly Finner (Right) hold a sign for the Baptist Student Ministry at the Organization Fair on Wednesday, Jan. 27. The BSM seeks to guide students on their spiritual journey and prepare them for missionary work in the future. Photo by Malaika Randolph/The Bells By The Bells Staff The Student Organizations were socially distancing as they were out in force on King Street on Wednesday, Jan. 27, hoping to interest students in joining their clubs. Tables for ABS (Association of Black Students), CAB (Campus Activities Board), and other clubs lined both sides of the walkway in front of Bawcom Student Union where members could greet other interested students as they socially distanced outside and in masks. Their tables illustrated  various club themes, and each included a QR code to provide more information with maximum social distancing. Kaleigh Darnell, a sophomore from Rockwall, left, and senior Maricela Ramirez of Austin, are both math majors manning the Math Club booth at the Org Fair on King Street, Wednesday, Jan. 27. Courtesy...

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Women’s basketball second half rally not enough against Hardin Simmons
Mar01

Women’s basketball second half rally not enough against Hardin Simmons

A Sader Bells member cheers on her team with the Crusader hand sign during the UMHB women’s basketball with Belhaven Jan 16, 2021. Photo by C.J. Halloran/The Bells By C.J. Halloran Staff Writer The CRU women’s Basketball team fell to Hardin-Simmons University 71-64 in a hard-fought game on Saturday, Jan. 30. The CRU started the game on the back foot with the Cowgirls opening up with a 13-4 run. CRU’s graduate student point guard Taylor Kollmorgen looks for quick options as she saves a ball from falling out of bounds. Photo by CJ Halloran The Cowgirls didn’t let up either, continuing to lengthen their lead to as many as 13 points before the first half came to a close. The Crusaders stormed back to tie the game in the third quarter, thanks to a 17-7 run capped off by leading scorer Olivia Champion. Unfortunately for the CRU, they were unable to carry their newfound momentum into the fourth quarter. Junior Guard Alexia Martin shouts Instructions as the CRU dominates McMurry University. Photo by CJ Halloran Hardin-Simmons battled back with a 10-2 run at the beginning of the fourth quarter and brought their lead back to ten points. That proved enough to hold the CRU at bay, taking them to a 71-64 defeat. Champion was the joint leading scorer for the team, scoring 13 off the bench, which tied with the other leading scorer, Bethany McLeod. Sophomore Hannah Eggleston also put up 10 points for the team. Sophomore Forward Olivia Champion Puts Up a Layup as McMurry’s Sydney McHenry and her teammate do their best to shut her down.  Photo by CJ Halloran The CRU next faced an away streak against Sul Ross University and Howard...

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Men’s Basketball hit good stride as the CRU took first games of season
Mar01

Men’s Basketball hit good stride as the CRU took first games of season

CRU Steamrolls Hardin-Simmons for sixth straight victory By C.J. Halloran Staff Writer Josiah Johnson draws a foul from Belhaven’s Rian Shields to extend UMHB’s lead against Belhaven University. Johnson has made more free throws than anyone in Division III this Season and is second in free throws in all divisions. Photo by C.J. Halloran/The Bells When asked about the ASC’s  (American Southwest Conference) new rule of basing tournament qualifiers on win percentage instead of overall wins, Coach Clif Carroll was straight forward.  “It is what it is, but if you win them all, then they’re not gonna keep you out of the tournament,” Carroll said. “If you win them all, you’re gonna be champion. It sounds crazy, but that’s the goal for this team.” Though every coach aims for his team to go undefeated, Coach Carroll took that mindset seriously and has coached the Crusaders to six victories in a row. Their victory came by way of a dominating 91-65 performance against Hardin-Simmons on Saturday, Jan. 30. One of the main arguments that critics of the CRU expressed was based on the team’s slow start, but the Crusaders shut that critique down against Hardin Simmons. UMHB opened the game on a 16-2 run that gave them a lead that did not change hands for the entirety of the game. The CRU absolutely dominated the offensive side of the ball, shooting 56% as a team.  Josiah Johnson continued his hot streak, scoring 34 points and picking up 12 rebounds, while 6’5” guard Ty Prince also picked up a double-double, scoring 22 points with 12 rebounds. The Crusaders showed out on the defensive end of the ball as well, holding the Cowboys to 34% shooting and 22 turnovers. Though one would imagine the team and Coach Carroll to be ecstatic after such a huge victory, they were all business. Coach Carroll went so far as to say he was unhappy with the CRU’s second half. “Today, we relaxed,” Coach Carroll said. “We lost our focus [in the second half]… I would rather us keep two feet on the ground and two hands on the ball [as opposed to some especially acrobatic passing from the CRU in the second half]. “Acrobatic turns into 27 turnovers… you can’t win championships turning it over 27 times,” Carroll said. Though the comments may seem harsh with such a dominant victory, the team shares this mentality and with it comes a hunger that can’t be quenched by any individual victory. The Crusaders have their eyes on one goal: the championship, and they refuse to let anyone get in their way. Sophomore guard Kyle Wright looks for...

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Winter storm shuts down Texas – Wipes out power, water and classes
Mar01

Winter storm shuts down Texas – Wipes out power, water and classes

The front entrance to UMHB, with Luther Memorial behind it, was covered in snow as the sun came out by mid-week. Temperatures remained low, however, so that snow stayed on the ground for several days. Courtesy photo By The Bells Staff UMHB students experienced the largest Texas winter storm on record beginning on Valentine’s weekend. Instead of special dinners and celebrations, students as well as all Texans found themselves getting ready for an unprecedented winter storm. By Friday, Feb. 13, milk and other essential items were already off the shelves, and people seemed to be in a panic. They were right to be worried. Most Texans were not expecting such a long snow and ice-in, since storms of this level almost never happen in the Lone Star State.  The real problem was that the state’s power grid was not prepared for this level of winter freeze, leaving its population in peril. Millions of Texans suffered for days without heat and water in record setting cold temperatures. The death toll is still being calculated. ERCOT (The Electric Reliability Council of Texas) ordered rolling blackouts that began on Valentine’s Day to accommodate all of the state’s needs. Texans would have to deal with these blackouts until the close of the following weekend. On the first days after Tuesday’s hardest freeze, the lines of people standing in the snow trying to get into HEBs in Central Texas stretched for blocks. Roads were iced over and trucks could not deliver supplies. Harrowing stories of the elderly and the ill left cold, deadly car pile-ups on the highways, as well as citizens coming to aid their fellow Texans filled the newscasts on television, while press conferences regularly updated the public with the latest strategies for coping. Water treatment plants shut down two days into the freeze, and those who had water were told it was necessary to boil it. People who had no water at all collected snow to fill their bathtubs and melted it to flush toilets. It was a dangerous inconvenience and expense, as not only hospitals were at risk, but the most vulnerable of the population. All this, on top of a pandemic that already had the world out of kilter for the last year. Students, professors and staff at UMHB found their campus closed as they shifted to concerns of weathering the storm. Much of the campus was without power, so the students turned to UMHB for help. BAWCOM opened its doors to students, offering free meals and power to all students. UMHB Dining Services posted that their members and student workers all came together during the weather to serve...

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COVID-19 update: Biden’s response

By Cole GarnerEditor in Chief President Joe Biden speaks with House Democratic Leaders in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Feb. 5, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)             Over 500,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 as of Monday, Feb. 22, according to Johns Hopkins University & Medicine. Additionally, various new strains of the virus have been popping up. A prominent strain to catch scientists’ attention was the U.K. variant, B.1.1.7. The variant was first found in September, when U.K. scientists warned that the variant proved itself to be more contagious than regular COVID-19 variants.             A study by a team of U.K. scientists at the Centre for Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases, last updated on Feb. 6, found that the variant is 43-82% more contagious than previous strains found.             This does not mean that the strain is deadlier than other strains. In fact, the same study found no evidence that it is more deadly. The U.K. variant has now ended up in at least 21 states in theU.S., worrying scientists and leaders across the country. Colorado Governor Jared Polis released a statement on Dec. 19, 2020 about the variant being found in the Centennial State.             “The health and safety of Coloradans is our top priority and [the state] will closely monitor this case, as well as all COVID-19 indicators, very closely,” Polis said. (Colorado.gov)             The U.K. variant is not the only strain. The Brazil P.1 variant, which is thought to be more transmissible than initial COVID-19 strains, has also been found in the U.S. The first known case of this strain was found in Minnesota on Jan. 25 of this year. The strain is similar to the U.K. variant, as it is more contagious but is not known to be more deadly.             UMHB professor and nurse Dr. Lynn Heise says that the mutations are to be expected during a pandemic.             “The people that were infected with [the original strain] looked a little bit different than the ones that are coming out now,” Dr. Heise said. “So those that are in Brazil and those that are in the U.K., they’re still the COVID virus, but they are mutated.”             This is part of the reason why getting vaccinated is important for most people. “They say right now that immunizations that we are receiving for COVID will cover the original [strain] as well as the mutations,” Dr. Heise said.             “That doesn’t mean that because I have been vaccinated, if I have been exposed to COVID, I won’t get sick. It’s probable I will [get sick], but I won’t get as sick as...

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Black History Month highlights those who have made a difference
Feb18

Black History Month highlights those who have made a difference

Beth Norvell studies the display featuring Virginia Leak, who graduated with the first integrated class at Temple High School in 1968 and graduated from the UMHB nursing program in 1979. The display is at the Musick Alumni Center and Museum at the Parker House on campus. Norvell is the Associate Director for Alumni Relations and the museum. By Malaika RandolphStaff Writer            There is an extra emphasis on Black History Month this year, especially because of protests that erupted after the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and other Black citizens. But there are also some important strides that have been made.            The brightest of those are that for the first time, a Black woman, Kamala Harris, was instated as the Vice President of the United States.  Harris also represents Asians, and she is the first African American and the first woman to have served as Attorney General of California, and the second African American woman to ever have been elected to the United States Senate.             “I think it’s amazing,” UMHB student Chloe Ruedas said. “We have a lot of work to do and a lot of progress to continue to make, but the efforts that we have taken are amazing. Especially for women and women of color. Even though we have so much progress in doing, it’s okay to celebrate what we have won.”            Ruedas pinpoints that not only did Harris win by becoming Vice President, but Black women won someone to represent them in the highest office.            “Having her as vice president, having someone who looks like us in such power is uplifting,” junior pre-med major Gilda Tchao said. Tchao is also involved in the Association of Black Students  (ABS) and Pre-Health Professionals Club.             Vice President Kamala Harris was in the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority when she was at Howard University. In her 2020 memoir,  she describes herself as what her mother expected her to be: a “confident, proud, black woman.”            Virginia Leak may have had the same inclination. She graduated with the first integrated class at Temple High School in 1968 and graduated then from UMHB’s nursing program in 1979. She is now an Educational Chairperson for the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), as well as a founder of Temple Colleges’ nursing program.             Beth Norvell, Associate Director of Alumni Relations of the UMHB Museum, said that Leak likes to guide and share her wisdom.            “When I interviewed her,” Norvell said, “she stopped and said, ‘now let me tell you about the Lord.’ She is so nurturing and sweet. She is vibrant.”            Leak mentioned...

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