Summer filled with training for UMHB ROTC cadets
Dec05

Summer filled with training for UMHB ROTC cadets

Many college students spend their summers making money at a part-time job, going on vacation or simply catching up on much-needed sleep. However, nine of the students in UMHB’s Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program did something a little different this summer. All nine cadets traveled to Fort Knox, Kentucky to complete Advanced Camp, a month-long summer training program for upcoming seniors. This program is considered to be the most important training event for a cadet, and successful completion of the program is a prerequisite for commissioning as a second lieutenant in the Army. During the Advanced Camp, cadets participate in classroom, field and weapons training, and they learn how to be successful officers. There they are assessed in their leadership skills, and they are tested in their physical skills. “The participants pass a physical fitness test, plus they take part in three road marches of 6, 8 and 12-miles with a 35-lb rucksack (an army version of an oversized backpack),” Senior military science instructor Carl Cook said. “They must complete a land navigation assessment and basic rifle marksmanship as part of nine mandatory requirements.” Advanced Camp serves as the final assessment for senior cadets before they are assigned to a branch of the Army. This year, six UMHB students will commission—one in December and five in May.  Spring UMHB graduate Matthew Boquiren already commissioned as a second lieutenant at the completion of camp in July, is awaiting his branch assignment with the National Guard. In addition to completing Advanced Camp, three cadets participated in the Nurse Summer Training Program, a unique experience that prepares cadets for careers as Army nurses. Cadet Eunice Chanco traveled to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland to complete the summer internship. Cadets Caroline Vining and Sydney McMurrey traveled to Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in Fort Belvoir, Virginia to complete the 28-day program. During their time in Fort Belvoir, Vining and McMurrey completed over 156 clinical hours in multiple medical units and participated in a research project. “Training this summer helped me [prepare] for my future as a nurse,” said Vining, who is preparing to graduate in December. “It required me to work in a stressful environment where I was constantly being assessed on my leadership skills under pressure. This helped prepare me for future events where I may be faced with difficult and stressful situations.” Some cadets traveled beyond the borders of the U.S. this summer. Senior pre-med biology major and military science minor Benjamin Kenneaster spent the first part of his summer at Advanced Camp in Fort Knox, he then traveled to Germany to work with the United...

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Sylvia White, lifelong learner, receives doctorate in 2019
Sep20

Sylvia White, lifelong learner, receives doctorate in 2019

Dr. Sylvia White is no ordinary UMHB graduate. At 76 years old, she is the oldest member of the Spring 2019 graduating class. On May 11, White, who teaches Exploring the Fine Arts class at UMHB, earned her Ed.D. in Educational Administration. She was one of 17 students who received a doctoral degree in the ceremony, which drew the largest audience for any commencement in the school’s history. White is no stranger to the world of education. In 1967, she earned a master’s degree from Baylor University. She worked as an elementary music teacher in her hometown of League City for 24 years. In 2009, she moved to Belton in order to be closer to her children. She began teaching piano lessons at the UMHB Conservatory, and soon afterward started teaching the Exploring the Fine Arts class. White describes herself as “a lifelong learner” which made the decision to go back to school a natural one. “I’ve always loved learning new things,” she said. One of her favorite parts of earning her doctorate was completing her dissertation. At UMHB, doctoral students complete an imbedded dissertation, meaning that they work on it during the entirety of their studies instead of just completing it in their final year. “All the classes in the Ed.D. program are geared to writing a piece of the dissertation in each class,” she said. “By the end of the three years, I had it completed.” When she chose a topic for her dissertation, White knew that she wanted to focus on veterans, who she says have a special place in her heart. “In teaching Exploring the Fine Arts, I had several student veterans, and they just touched my heart,” she said. “My first veteran asked if he could sit at the back of the room and keep the windows open. I thought, ‘there must be a way to help student veterans.’” Her desire to help these students was a major motivation for her to earn her doctoral degree. She knew that by having an Ed.D. in education, she would be better equipped to help these students in the future. Dr. Randy Hendricks, who is the director of UMHB’s Doctor of Education Program, is proud of White’s accomplishments. “Dr. White was an exceptional student in the UMHB doctoral program and provides an inspiring example of what a Christian educator should be,” Hendricks said. Senior social work major Nathan Gammage, who is White’s grandson, is incredibly proud of her accomplishments. “She works so hard and does a lot to give back to the community,” he said. “I am so proud of her.” White is not sure what God...

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The Bells editors bid farewell

Emily Mahan: Editor-In-Chief This May, I will be graduating from UMHB, bringing my time as Editor-In-Chief of The Bells to a close. Although I have only held this title for one semester, I have learned so much. Not only have I improved practical skills such as writing, editing, photography and newspaper design, but I have also had the opportunity to learn from and work with the best staff I could ask for. First and foremost, I want to thank Dr. Rebecca McEntee, adviser to The Bells. Not only did you teach me everything I need to know about working for a newspaper, but you also encouraged me throughout every step of my journey from staff writer to editor. I truly could not have done this without you. Second, I want to thank the professors in UMHB’s English and communication departments. As a double major in English and public relations, most of my classes have been in these fields, and I am inspired by each of the wonderful professors who helped me succeed. I would especially like to thank my advisers, Dr. Nathaniel Hansen and professor Avery Green, department chairs Dr. Joey Tabarlet and Dr. Laura Bedwell, and Associate Dean of Humanities Dr. Jacky Dumas. I would also like to thank Bri Bullion, Assistant Editor of The Bells. Not only are you an amazing editor, but you’re also an amazing friend. Thank you for always being there for me, going on coffee runs with me, having late night homework parties and obsessing over cats with me. In addition, I would like to thank the incredible Bells staff. Madi, thank you for helping me learn how to use Adobe InDesign and always letting me cuddle Moses, your adorable dog. Beau, thank you for dealing with my lack of sports knowledge and, more importantly, being one of my best friends. Amy, Kayla, Randi and Kate—thank you for always being so enthusiastic and bringing so much fun to the newsroom. I also want to thank Lauren Lum, former Editor-In-Chief, as well as Jimmy, Sarah, Bria and Jasmin. Finally, I would like to thank the students, alumni, faculty and staff for reading The Bells. Our paper truly could not exist without your support. Thank you for walking with us through our journey. As I step into the future and embrace life after graduation, I will keep in mind all of the knowledge I gained at UMHB, and I will cherish the lifelong friendships I have made here. I am so grateful for everything I have experienced in college. These past three years could not have been any better, and I will never stop calling this amazing...

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