Beards for Bucks- Pageant beards auctioned for charity
Apr20

Beards for Bucks- Pageant beards auctioned for charity

With eyeliner still smudged on their faces, the men of Easter Pageant waited to be shaved for a cause. Beards for Bucks is a tradition that occurs annually after Easter Pageant since Jeff Sutton, Assistant Director of Campus Activities, was a student here at UMHB. Sutton and some of his friends involved in Easter Pageant in 2007 had a passion for missions and wanted to bring the concept of raising money from facial hair to UMHB. Sutton’s own beard raised around $1500 after a spirited bidding war between his family and friends ended in a compromise that both parties would pay. Beards for Bucks, true to the reason it began, benefitted the GoNow Missionaries this year and raised a total of $675. Beth Ann Earley, a junior education major, shared her story of how GoNow Missions impacted her life. “It changed a lot of things for me—how important kids are to me, my major…it changed my life,” she said. Earley travelled to Compala, Uganda over the summer to serve in a temporary orphanage for kids newborn to 2-years-old. She served in this home for two months over the summer and came to realize the need for missionaries in these orphanages. “You’re preparing that baby to be loved by their future parents,” Earley said. Freshman Christian studies major Cody Cowan was another student missionary who benefited from last year’s Beards for Bucks. Cowan visited Moldova over Christmas break to show orphans what it means to be loved and to have hope. He spoke at the event, emphasizing the importance of supporting summer missions. “Support the people that are going with GoNow—buy their T-shirts,” Cowan said. Jesse Malina, an alumnus of UMHB and the campus missionary intern, opened the night with a simple prayer of thanksgiving. “Dear Lord, thank you for beards. Beards are cool,” he said. Soon after the prayer, the night erupted with raised hands and cheers for participants to place their bids on the beards. Before the auction began, bearded contestants had designs shaved into their facial hair. Among the most popular designs were the reverse goatee, the Nike check, and the striped beard style. TJ Crenshaw, a freshmen engineering major, played James the Younger, a disciple of Jesus. Crenshaw’s beard sold for the highest price of the night, coming to a total of $150 with a variety of contributors. Crenshaw encouraged everyone to get involved in Easter Pageant and Beards for Bucks next year. “[Beards for Bucks] is a great opportunity to raise some money. We need more people doing it. We need voluptuous beards,” Crenshaw said. Beards for Bucks is an excellent way to raise money...

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Campus celebrates heritage
Feb16

Campus celebrates heritage

Charter Day is a celebration that never ceases to bring current students and alumni together in awe of the growth of the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor. This year, UMHB’s birthday was celebrated with balloons, cake, and the ceremonial placing of flowers on Judge Baylor’s grave. “We take Charter Day to remember how much Judge Baylor did to build UMHB,” said Student Foundation President Autumn Brewer. “We also pray to God and thank Him for his faithfulness to the school, and we ask Him to continue to pour blessings out to us.” While students might have been motivated to blow out the candles of UMHB’s 171st birthday party because of the free cupcakes, the desire for Crusaders to observe Charter Day has long been a priority. Over the years, Charter Day became an invitation to all alumni to reconnect with their classmates, relive old memories, and continue traditions. UMHB Museum Director Betty Sue Beebe said the university has continued to grow throughout the years. “Although a lot has changed at [Mary Hardin-Baylor], it is great to see the positive changes on campus for students these days.” During Beebe’s reign as Alumni Director, students helped orchestrate these weekend-long festivities, which gave the alumni a chance to see the continued focus on character and diversity in Mary Hardin-Baylor’s halls. The importance placed on community is not new to UMHB, however. A concept kin to activities put on by sororities today was alive and well before the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor even had its current name. Upperclassmen, called Big Sisters, took on new freshmen (appropriately labelled Little Sisters) to mentor, support, and encourage through their first two years of college. Although there is no longer “Bigs” and “Littles” on campus, older students still take younger students under their wing. Brewer said she’s experienced that same sense of family during her years at UMHB. “It was amazing to see smiling faces who care about me and who I get to live life with,” she said. “I had sophomores and juniors pouring into me and supporting me my freshmen year.” Community is one of the cornerstones of UMHB. The gesture that brought the university from Independence to Belton was from the pastor of First Baptist Church Belton at the time. The city of Temple offered UMHB a $30,000 contract, but at the pastor’s insistence, the community of Belton pulled together to raise $31,000, and UMHB transferred to Belton. The pastor found it important to encourage female education, and “Baylor Female College” helped achieve that goal. Celebrating the birthday of the university gives students and alumni the opportunity to look back into time, and to marvel at...

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