Self-defense class teaches students awareness on-campus
Sep28

Self-defense class teaches students awareness on-campus

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells With the number of mass shootings growing by the day, “campus safety” is a popular news topic. However, as a private university with just under 4,000 students in attendance (that’s just under 7% of the population of Texas A&M), campus safety looks a little different to UMHB. So what does it look like to be safe on campus? What are the biggest threats on campus? What are the most common crimes committed here at UMHB? How do we defend ourselves when preventative measures have failed? These are some of the questions that officers Steve Carter and Kevin Mertz answered during their self-defense class, last Thursday evening in the Lord Conference Center. “The main goal of this class is to make students safe on campus,” said Carter. The officer said the biggest danger to students on campus is self-inflicted danger, or students putting themselves in harm’s way. Carter suggests avoiding potentially harmful or illegal situations like not bringing alcohol or drugs on campus. He also suggests that students take their things with them when they leave their vehicles and dorm rooms. “The most common crimes on campus are thefts,” the officer said. “We have thefts that happen from people coming from off campus to on campus, but we also have thefts that are student-to-student.” On-campus thefts are more than likely crimes of opportunity,” Carter said. That’s why the officer stressed so heavily the point of being aware of one’s surroundings and not being an easy target. Carter also cleared up for his self-defense class that any time you enter a vehicle when you’re not supposed to, it’s considered a break-in. After the informational portion of the class, the officers gave the students a tutorial on how to defend themselves against a physical assault. Carter believes that the best defense is being self-aware and being aware of your surroundings. He uses the verse, 1 Peter 5:8: “Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour,” to emphasize his points. “Your best weapon is your mind,” he said. “Your best defense is to be someplace else.” Carter also spoke about listening to “that little voice” that alerts us to when something is wrong. “Listen to that voice,” Carter said. “Don’t ignore it. At the police department, every one of us believes in that little voice; that it is more in tune with your surroundings than you are.” As a precursor to learning basic attack moves from Mertz, he told the attendees that the class was not meant to teach you...

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UMHB launches all online program

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells This fall, the university launched a new degree program called MyWay. This all-online program is geared toward adult learners who are looking to finish their degrees through Competency-Based Education (CBE). MyWay is set up so that a student pays $3,000 for a six-month subscription to MyWay. The subscription gives them access to “all you can complete” modules and assessments, which are equivalent to lectures and tests. Students are expected to finish at least 12 hours in the allotted six-month period, but are encouraged to do more. Dr. ChrissAnn Merriman, Interim Director for Distance Education at UMHB, worked closely with a team of seven to create MyWay. “This is a 20-month plus initiative that over 100 faculty and staff have helped design and develop.” The preparation of MyWay also included research of what employers were looking for in an employee. This helped the team to structure their degree plans to fit the students’work needs. The degree, labelled Applied Studies and Organizational Leadership, is a comprehensive plan that combines the greatest needs of both the students and the employers. This includes: communication, teamwork, and ability to develop their coworkers. Merriman also mentioned that MyWay is mainly geared towards adult learners who are coming back to get their degree. “There are a lot of students across the country who have credit, but never were able to finish their degree,” she said. “We’ve found that we could help the degree-completers who may have had things happen in their lives that caused them to complete their degree. So, we’re able to help.” Merriman and her team have prepared for the struggles of an online degree program, especially considering that some students haven’t studied in many years. “We’ve really set up some good tutorials for students like how to write an essay. Some of these students have not written an essay in years, so it’s important to help them identify what an essay looks like and what to think about when you’re writing them.” Instead of tests, the MyWay program assesses students’ skills by having them do projects at the end of every module. This reinforces the information the students have learned. “There are not multiple choice or short essay. These are projects they apply potentially to their business or something in their lives or something that’s happening.” The students’ progress is monitered weekly by MyWay Success Coach, Teesha Goosh. “I’m here to encourage, to support, and to interact with students, to let them know that I’m here to serve them,” Goosh said. The success coach said she lives by the model of “serve with...

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Beards for Bucks- Pageant beards auctioned for charity
Apr20

Beards for Bucks- Pageant beards auctioned for charity

With eyeliner still smudged on their faces, the men of Easter Pageant waited to be shaved for a cause. Beards for Bucks is a tradition that occurs annually after Easter Pageant since Jeff Sutton, Assistant Director of Campus Activities, was a student here at UMHB. Sutton and some of his friends involved in Easter Pageant in 2007 had a passion for missions and wanted to bring the concept of raising money from facial hair to UMHB. Sutton’s own beard raised around $1500 after a spirited bidding war between his family and friends ended in a compromise that both parties would pay. Beards for Bucks, true to the reason it began, benefitted the GoNow Missionaries this year and raised a total of $675. Beth Ann Earley, a junior education major, shared her story of how GoNow Missions impacted her life. “It changed a lot of things for me—how important kids are to me, my major…it changed my life,” she said. Earley travelled to Compala, Uganda over the summer to serve in a temporary orphanage for kids newborn to 2-years-old. She served in this home for two months over the summer and came to realize the need for missionaries in these orphanages. “You’re preparing that baby to be loved by their future parents,” Earley said. Freshman Christian studies major Cody Cowan was another student missionary who benefited from last year’s Beards for Bucks. Cowan visited Moldova over Christmas break to show orphans what it means to be loved and to have hope. He spoke at the event, emphasizing the importance of supporting summer missions. “Support the people that are going with GoNow—buy their T-shirts,” Cowan said. Jesse Malina, an alumnus of UMHB and the campus missionary intern, opened the night with a simple prayer of thanksgiving. “Dear Lord, thank you for beards. Beards are cool,” he said. Soon after the prayer, the night erupted with raised hands and cheers for participants to place their bids on the beards. Before the auction began, bearded contestants had designs shaved into their facial hair. Among the most popular designs were the reverse goatee, the Nike check, and the striped beard style. TJ Crenshaw, a freshmen engineering major, played James the Younger, a disciple of Jesus. Crenshaw’s beard sold for the highest price of the night, coming to a total of $150 with a variety of contributors. Crenshaw encouraged everyone to get involved in Easter Pageant and Beards for Bucks next year. “[Beards for Bucks] is a great opportunity to raise some money. We need more people doing it. We need voluptuous beards,” Crenshaw said. Beards for Bucks is an excellent way to raise money...

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Campus celebrates heritage
Feb16

Campus celebrates heritage

Charter Day is a celebration that never ceases to bring current students and alumni together in awe of the growth of the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor. This year, UMHB’s birthday was celebrated with balloons, cake, and the ceremonial placing of flowers on Judge Baylor’s grave. “We take Charter Day to remember how much Judge Baylor did to build UMHB,” said Student Foundation President Autumn Brewer. “We also pray to God and thank Him for his faithfulness to the school, and we ask Him to continue to pour blessings out to us.” While students might have been motivated to blow out the candles of UMHB’s 171st birthday party because of the free cupcakes, the desire for Crusaders to observe Charter Day has long been a priority. Over the years, Charter Day became an invitation to all alumni to reconnect with their classmates, relive old memories, and continue traditions. UMHB Museum Director Betty Sue Beebe said the university has continued to grow throughout the years. “Although a lot has changed at [Mary Hardin-Baylor], it is great to see the positive changes on campus for students these days.” During Beebe’s reign as Alumni Director, students helped orchestrate these weekend-long festivities, which gave the alumni a chance to see the continued focus on character and diversity in Mary Hardin-Baylor’s halls. The importance placed on community is not new to UMHB, however. A concept kin to activities put on by sororities today was alive and well before the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor even had its current name. Upperclassmen, called Big Sisters, took on new freshmen (appropriately labelled Little Sisters) to mentor, support, and encourage through their first two years of college. Although there is no longer “Bigs” and “Littles” on campus, older students still take younger students under their wing. Brewer said she’s experienced that same sense of family during her years at UMHB. “It was amazing to see smiling faces who care about me and who I get to live life with,” she said. “I had sophomores and juniors pouring into me and supporting me my freshmen year.” Community is one of the cornerstones of UMHB. The gesture that brought the university from Independence to Belton was from the pastor of First Baptist Church Belton at the time. The city of Temple offered UMHB a $30,000 contract, but at the pastor’s insistence, the community of Belton pulled together to raise $31,000, and UMHB transferred to Belton. The pastor found it important to encourage female education, and “Baylor Female College” helped achieve that goal. Celebrating the birthday of the university gives students and alumni the opportunity to look back into time, and to marvel at...

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