Where are they now- Oliver Stone
Feb08

Where are they now- Oliver Stone

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Oliver Stone graduated from UMHB in 2015 with a degree in communications. As a Crusader, Stone was involved in Cru Football, which is what he misses most about being a student on campus. “Nothing compares to being with the boys that you go through everything with,” Stone said. “I miss being around that family.” At Stone’s job at the Cotton Patch Cafe, one of his regular customers connected him to Jamie Garrett, one of the producers at KCLN, a radio station based out of Temple. Stone, who’s affectionately called by friends as “Ozzey,” came to the station for an interview and was essentially given the job. He was learning how to produce by his first week at the station, and by his second week he was producing and reporting on sports games. That year, Stone produced all of the games for Temple High and UMHB’s 2015 football season. At the close of that season, Stone began working on “demo” CDs and sending them to Garrett, who gave encouragement and constructive criticism for his radio personality skills. By the end of summer in 2016, Stone was given the opportunity to DJ his own show, appropriately named “Operation Turn Up.” His on-air name, ‘Big O’, introduces listeners to local DJs trying to make it big. On Operation Turn Up, Stone introduces the local DJs, advertises for KCLN if they’re doing a promotion or giveaway, continues discussing DJs or other pertinent events between breaks, and then hands the show off to the next DJ, Mike D. Stone said that one of the most influential aspects of his education at UMHB was his communication practice. “Being in a studio is different from speaking live to an audience, but you still have a lot of people tuning in to what you have to say.” UMHB really helped me get comfortable with speaking in my advanced public speaking classes.” When asked why the radio personality wanted to stay in the area, he said that his primary motivation was the comfort of God’s provision. Although he originally wanted to go back to his hometown of Fort Worth and produce there, he had a feeling that he needed to be patient where he was. In the end, he understood why. “[Temple] is a smaller market, so you’re not overwhelmed by the competition. Here, I’m given the chance to grow and learn the ins and outs of the radio so that when I do decide to move elsewhere, I am multifaceted.” Although he has appreciated his time in Temple, he does hope to eventually move into a big...

Read More
A not-so-unfortunate  book adaptation on Netflix
Jan25

A not-so-unfortunate book adaptation on Netflix

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells Unnecessary word definitions, Einstein-esque hair and intriguingly depressing plot: these are the cornerstones of Lemony Snicket’s Series of Unfortunate Events. The books that the Netflix series are based on were originally published from 1999 to 2006, and all thirteen books experienced great success. The movie adaption, which aired in 2004, was directed by Brad Silberling and received a 6.8 out of 10 from IMDB. Criticisms rained onto the movie for being too compact and unable to truly do the book series’ odd twists and turns justice in a short hour and 48 minutes. The Netflix series, which was released January 13th, 2017, expounds on the books and, according to popular opinion, truly brings the unfortunate story to life. Count Olaf, portrayed by Neil Patrick Harris, is a washed-up actor who’s hungry for his young relatives’ fortune. He provides a meager living for the Baudelaire children in exchange for slave labor and time to formulate various plans to steal their inheritance. The Baudelaire children are recently orphaned and have a unique set of skills that assist them in evading their wild relative’s plots against them. Violet, played by Malina Weismann, is the oldest orphan at 14 with uncanny abilities to fix, invent, and tinker. She is usually seen with her infant sister, Sunny, around her hip, who has sharp teeth that help her do everything from slice bread to carving the perfect skipping stone. Klaus, the 12 year old bookworm and researcher of the family, is played by Louis Hynes. Do-gooders who attempt to intervene in the Baudelaires’ fate usually end up dead, which is another aspect of the series that makes it so horribly entertaining. The television series is overwhelmingly well done, and portrays Lemony Snicket’s work as it was meant to be seen. Barry Sonnenfeld, director of the series, is praised for his meticulous attention to detail in the twelve-book sequence. Patrick Warburton, who plays the dutifully devoted narrator to the bleak Baudelaire history known as Lemony Snicket, carries the cadence of the story in a refreshingly strange fashion. Between the plot that drops jaws and the whimsical costumes and language, A Series of Unfortunate Events sets the bar for 2017...

Read More
Students save lives by donating at on-campus blood drive
Jan25

Students save lives by donating at on-campus blood drive

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells Students line up outside of the Baylor Scott & White Donor Services van, waiting to give life-giving material to those in need. Many of them are enticed into donating by a free T-shirt, free snacks, or the volunteer service hours. But most are just there to help in any way they can. While their reasons for donating vary, Julie Skoda, Baylor Scott & White Donor Services recruiter, said the healthcare system is just happy to receive these donations. “The main motivation in seeking blood donations on campus is the possibility to save two lives with every donation,” she said. Skoda is often seen by UMHB students campaigning for donations. But a large part of her job is partnering with local businesses who are willing to host blood drives. “We get a pretty good turn out here at Mary Hardin-Baylor,” Skoda said. “I usually get about 30 a day here, which is 60 pints of blood every visit.” The recruiter’s team visits UMHB twice a semester, but students don’t have to wait for a blood drive to donate. They can visit any of the Baylor Scott & White locations to be of service. Donors must be over 16-years-of-age and weigh at least 110 pounds. It’s also important that students are not planning a mission trip overseas if they want to be a donor because of some traveling restrictions associated with donating blood. Tori Pharris, sophomore public relations major and recent donor, said donating on campus is much different than when she donated during her high school years. “Here, it’s more personable,” Pharris said. “Every blood drive I walk in, and they know who I am and remember my face.” Pharris has been donating blood since her sophomore year of high school, but she doesn’t do so for the free T-shirt or a cartoon Band-Aid. “I donate because someone did it for me. When I was eight, I had open heart surgery and a blood drive was held in my name. Family and friends donated for me, so now I get the satisfaction of saving two lives every time I donate.” Although the wait can be tiring, and trypanophobia (fear of needles) is a daunting obstacle to overcome, Pharris urges students, faculty and staff to consider the pros and cons of donating. “It’s maybe an hour out of your time for someone else’s life,” she said. “You have the ability to save the world, even if your part of the world is just one...

Read More

Stay-at-home Christian

Published in the December 7, 2016 issue of The Bells Going to a Christian university can be hard when you’re not called to every single cause that is presented to you.It sometimes seems like every student spends their summer feeding orphans in Africa or building homes in the Ukraine. When a numerous amout of classmates discuss their plans to enter the mission field, it can be intimidating. I became familiar with the pressure to find “my cause” while attending a private Christian high school. Friends who were passionate about their cause would employ tactics that pulled at my heartstrings and stoked the fire in my soul so that I felt connected to a specific cause. While the intention behind the phenomenon is pure, it can sometimes give those not called to a particular cause anxiety about not feeling that call. I couldn’t be more excited for my friends jetting off to the far reaches of the world this upcoming summer. But I’m not called to international missions, and that’s okay. I’m allowed to empathize with a picture of an orphan without needing to catch the next flight overseas to care for them. I’m allowed to love on missionaries and support them and not desire to follow in their footsteps. I’m allowed to serve and do missions right where I am.This doesn’t mean that I don’t have the faith that missionaries do, or that I’m more materialistic, or that I’m far from God. Quite the contrary. It actually means that despite the pressures from within the community of Christians, I know God will use me. I can take comfort that He is going to use me just as missionaries overseas. So, if you’re not feeling the tug of international missions, it’s not because you’re weak. It’s not because God doesn’t want you or that you’re not listening hard enough. The world that God has created is a mission field, and every soul not bound to the Father is an orphan. Jesus made us to worship Him and to do the good works He has created for us. And that doesn’t just mean overseas. It means...

Read More

SGA and Sodexo strive to reduce university’s carbon footprint

Published in the December 7, 2016 issue of The Bells The university has recently begun taking steps to reduce their carbon footprint. The Student Government Association (SGA) and Sodexo Dining Services are leading the way by taking precautions against unnecessary waste of food, fuel, and energy. The possibility of having to-go containers in the dining hall of Bawcom Student Union was initially raised in SGA’s annual Buddy Night in October, and the organization has since performed research and contacted Sodexo to make to-go containers a reality. However, doggie bags aren’t the only way to cut back on food waste in Bawcom. Alex Kown, student body vice president for the SGA, is looking into creating a compost out of the disposed food so it can be used as a fertilizer, which will reduce gardening costs. James Quinn, the general manager for dining facilities, shares the composting vision as well. “We plan on creating a food compost that would eventually contribute to us having our own herb garden,” he explains. “That way we’ll have our own rosemary, parsley, anything we need right on campus.” There will be quite a few new, exciting changes to Bawcom under Quinn’s leadership. For one, Quinn is replacing his senior staff with people who have more experience and education in culinary arts and dietary needs. This means that gluten-free and dairy-free options will be more abundant in the coming semester, and a larger variety of food will be offered. Kown plans on incentivizing the students to contribute to reducing the school’s carbon footprint. “Students can recycle, they can turn out their apartment lights more, and they can just walk or ride their bike to class instead of drive.” To encourage more energy efficiency, Kown intends to use a scraps program from another university. The scraps concept is that whatever money that is saved month to month on the energy bill is donated to a nonprofit environmental organization. “Since we go to a university where the students actually care about the world, it should be easy to get them on board.” Specialized lids and awareness of the strict rules that recycling demands will all aid the process of making the university more environmentally conscious, according to Kown. Student participation is an essential part of making UMHB more energy efficient. Although SGA is aware of the parking situation for students who live on campus, they would like to encourage students to walk or ride their bikes to class. Kown would like to see UMHB become a carbon neutral campus and to run on solely renewable sources. He also encourages students, if they have any other concerns or ideas,...

Read More
Page 4 of 6« First...23456