Hunter Rae Band  steals the show during  downtown performance
Aug23

Hunter Rae Band steals the show during downtown performance

Hunter Glaskae of the Hunter Rea Band performed an acoustic set of original songs from his new album Lovin’ Ain’t Free at the Gin complex Friday evening. His three-hour show included a series of blues-rock songs, personal anecdotes, and a five-minute break to hold a parrot brought in by an audience member. The full-length album’s release is the realization of a big dream for the band. “It’s always been our goal [to release an album],” Glaskae said. “Since its release, we’ve gotten some really good feedback and have gotten connected with a lot of good people.” The band’s music focuses heavily on three aspects: songwriting, making an impact for the Kingdom and creating a soulful sound. “We are a Christian-based band and the most important thing for us is our Christian identity,” he said. Their shared faith has been a consistent cornerstone of the Hunter Rea band since its inception in 2009. Glaskae and bandmate Adam Rea met at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor playing football. The pair’s career in music launched as they played various events for the university as well as around Waco and Belton. “[UMHB] gave us a lot of good opportunities,” Glaskae said. “Now, anytime we get to come back and play for UMHB, [we] love doing that.” Eventually the two members quit football to pursue their band’s dream, and added three other band members to complete their five-person band. Glaskae, who graduated with an international business degree, decided to pursue music full-time when he realized he didn’t feel quite right in corporate America. “I recently left my job at McLane Company,” he said. “I felt like the Lord was telling me to move. I felt like [He] was telling me to pursue some different goals and dreams.” Up next for the band is a radio tour around Texas and surrounding states, beginning in West Texas on Wednesday. The traveling tour will consist of a series of interviews with local country radio stations and will take them throughout Oklahoma and Kansas as well as Texas. “My greatest advice is to get out there and sound horrible,” Glaskae said. “I think the greatest thing is just to go out and be yourself and don’t let anybody change you.” Glaskae mentioned that their first few shows were full of missteps. “We were horrible. We weren’t seasoned musicians. We just threw together what we could,” he said. “As a matter of fact, my mic fell off the stage because the stage was so rocky. I asked an audience member, ‘would you mind putting that back there?’” Despite malfunctions of all kinds on stage, Glaskae and the Hunter Rea...

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Photography exhibit gives budding artists hands-on experience
Apr26

Photography exhibit gives budding artists hands-on experience

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Townsend Memorial Library is hosting a new kind of exhibit that will last through the end of the year in honor of Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, which is celebrated April 30. The exhibit displays works of art created through pinhole photography, which professor John Hancock’s Photography 2 class is learning. “Pinhole photography uses a pinhole camera, or a camera obscura,” he said. “A camera obscura is basically a lightproof box with a small hole, or aperture, in it.” The lightproof box houses a piece of photo paper, which is light sensitive and records what the small hole sees, just like the eye does.” “After the paper is exposed, we take it to the dark room and develop it with chemicals using a wet darkroom technique. The image results in a negative photo, so we have to develop it twice to get an image.” This is Hancock’s first semester teaching in-depth pinhole photography. Although this technique of photography has been mentioned before in his classes, this semester’s students experienced the whole process, from building the cameras themselves to developing and hanging the images in the library. “We built [the pinhole cameras] in class as a part of a hands-on, student-based learning exercise. I think student-centered learning is far more effective than lecturing.” Besides the perk of avoiding lecturing, Hancock also enjoys the environment that is created through the process of developing the images. “I like that we’re able to bring in a classroom community that works together and helps each other. It was more of a community of just creating without worrying about the outcome of a grade.” Hancock jokingly said that his biggest goal for the semester was for his students to “have fun making art and wasting materials.” But he added that his actual desire was to teach his students to “take control of stealing light and time; taking [coal] and turning it into a diamond.” “Learning about the process and learning to appreciate it was my biggest takeaway,” said senior graphic design major, Kameryn Boggess. “We’re so used to snapping photos over and over, and just taking it again if we don’t like it.” “I’ve enjoyed [learning pinhole photography] immensely, but it definitely took a lot of patience,” she said. Though all parts of the pinhole photography process were fascinating to the class, Hancock’s favorite part is the hands-on aspect that developing photos in the darkroom demands. “As nerdy as it sounds, it kind of feels like alchemy; magic in the dark. It has a zen, soothing quality to it, with the running water and the red...

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Is the church sending women the wrong message?
Mar29

Is the church sending women the wrong message?

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Humans have the unique ability to communicate, record, and understand each other in ever-deepening ways with language. We’ve used these methods of communication to make movies, write poetry and songs, and convey news to the masses. The Lord uses it to bring us into a deeper understanding of himself, and churches use it to encourage revival. But are we, as the church, conveying the proper message with some of the words we speak to our women? I know avid church goers, family members and pastors have the right idea. They want to encourage chastity and purity by giving women an incentive: stay pure for your husband. Nobody wants damaged goods or low hanging fruit. Matthew 5:8 says, “blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.” I’m not trying to undercut the Bible. Purity in all forms is definitely important. I’ve also heard enough sermons to know how satisfying it is to wait until marriage. However, should we be teaching women from a young age that they are somehow less worthy of love and affection because of their past experiences? That their only motivation for purity should be to actualize a fantasy for her future husband? That no one will want her if she is not a virgin? The Bible does not condemn us and turn us away from the Lord because of our sins. If the wages of lying, stealing, and cheating are death (Romans 6:23), then so is sex outside of marriage. Sexual sin is no more potent a grievance against God than getting drunk or disrespecting your professor. In fact, Jesus’ harshest words were reserved for the prideful, the hypocritical, and the unbelieving believers—not for the sexually immoral (Matthew 23:13-36). My intention is not to twist the words of God, saying that it’s a good thing to have a rotation of sexual partners, or to play with the fire of sensuality. However, sexual sin, whether for singles, those married or homosexuals, suddenly seems to be placed on a higher pedestal of condemnation than all else. All humans are on the same level. “From dust you came, and to dust you will return,” (Genesis 3:19). In other words, we’re all in a sinking boat, and throwing stones at the group you feel is most deserving of hate will only sink you both faster. By calling women who have been sexually active by these derogatory names, we propagate the idea that a woman’s worth is found in a wedding ring. This language tells her that in order to be of the most value, she must maintain...

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Towel theft epidemic continues at Mayborn Campus Center
Mar08

Towel theft epidemic continues at Mayborn Campus Center

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells For Crusaders that frequent Mayborn Campus Center, the little white towels with a blue stripe are a common sight. The question of “would you like a towel?” posed by the attendants at the front desk begs a deeper inquiry of workout-hopefuls: Can you handle the responsibility of using one of our towels? And the answer, more often than you’d think, is no. Not only are Mayborn towels strewn carelessly over equipment and the gym floor, but they are also forgotten over shoulders and accidentally taken home. Caleb Damron, Operations Manager at Mayborn, has been brainstorming ways with his coworkers to reduce the amount of towels that disappear monthly. “We lose about 70 towels a month between the fall and spring semesters between damaged and missing towels.” That adds up to 280 towels a semester. Right now, Mayborn’s biggest defense against accidental towel theft is the watchful eyes of the front desk attendants. The campus center employees offer helpful reminders when they notice a little blue stripe over the shoulder of an exiting gym patron. “We’d like to get towel disappearances down to 20 a month,” Damron said. But Mayborn can’t do it without the help of the student body. Sophomore nursing major, Lauren Cater said she has accidentally left the gym with a towel after a workout. “I have twice,” she admits. “But I can’t take them back…it would be weird if I just brought back their towels after having them for months.” How many students feel the same way Cater does, stifled by the shame of their grievances and too afraid of condemnation to come clean? Luckily, there’s hope. Damron offers an open, nonjudgmental invitation to return the towels, free of ridicule. “If you notice you made it home with a towel, bring it back the next time you come in. And if you realize you have some at home, just bring them back.” Cater has a suggestion for Mayborn that could lessen their monthly disappearances and cultivate positive feelings about returning a towel. “I think they should have a [forgotten towel] bucket, so they can count the number of towels that are returned. That way, returning towels would feel more acceptable.” “I think that would be a great idea,” said Cater. “It would be funny to advertise for a day to give towels back.” The Mayborn staff has a lot of tricks up their sleeves when it comes to towel returns, but their biggest request is for the students to simply bring them...

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Local businessman and UMHB grad supports the Cru
Feb22

Local businessman and UMHB grad supports the Cru

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells When students get tired of the coffee prices that come with the green logo in Belton, the next stop is Arusha Coffee Co. Stemming from a weak and weary creature who upon eating a coffee bean was revived and full of energy, Arusha’s came to Belton in 2012. The owner, Hatem Couchane, brought his 15 years of experience in the field of coffee to Belton, Texas. He grew up in Tunis, Tunisia, and strives to bring the best of his culture into the laidback atmosphere of Arusha’s coffeehouse. As a UMHB alumnus, Couchane makes Arusha’s as Cru-friendly of an atmosphere as possible. “UMHB students are never an issue,” shop manager Ernst Jacques said laughingly. One look around on a busy Sunday evening will tell you that there is no doubt that college students are welcome at Arusha’s. Additionally, Arusha’s takes CruCash, which is ever so valuable in the times when you’re desperate for some tea and are out of cash. For more money-saving, Arusha’s has an app called Perka, where avid coffee drinkers can record their points and earn free drinks. Arusha’s also employs four current UMHB college students and employs a social media intern, Emily Maulding, who assists in all their online campaigns. Arusha’s helps the school in any way they can, and recently gave a small donation to the UMHB Girls’ basketball team. They also assist in various events for UMHB by hosting them with no charge and selling their coffee at discount rates. “Finals are busy,” Jacques mentioned, symapthaizing with the struggle students face. “The only thing students don’t do here is sleep. They spend all day here. We’re glad to be part of their future, and happy to be a part of their...

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