Shaping students through apprenticeships

Students are now able to receive even more hands-on job experience thanks to the Belton Apprenticeship Program. The program began in January 2012 and has been off to a good start. Since the program is fairly new, the team is still learning what works for the students and what they can do better next time. Programs Director for the Belton Area Chamber of Commerce Mark Arrazola said the apprenticeship is for one semester. “The length could expand in the future. With this being the first class, there is still plenty to review and discuss to help build and develop the program more,” Arrazola said. “The primary objective of  program activities is for the mentor to guide the student on career development, help them make contacts and networks in Belton and beyond and offer workplace and community awareness.” The program first began with an idea from Billy Moyer of SOS leadership institute. Arrazola said, “He  had developed Apprentice Austin and told us about it….We knew instantly that we had to do a similar program for our area. After a few meetings with Billy and UMHB, the program was              developed.” For those interested in entering the program, the process is simple. Arrazola said, “Students pick up applications from the Career Services Office on campus, fill it out and return it. The applications are then taken to the chamber for review after the deadline, and the class is selected.” Some participants may wonder if they already have internships, what the difference is between internships and apprenticeships. “Apprenticeships offer the students more insight and the ability to get one on one with a person in the field they want to go into. The apprentice sets the terms of what they want to get out of the mentoring relationship and are able to have more say in what they will want to do in the program,” Arrazola said. “In an internship, the intern is given a set of tasks to do and may not get to ever be one on one with someone who could really give them insights and pointers about their future career. An internship also may not offer up the opportunity to build one’s network in the business area.” The program has a diverse mixture of people from different career paths. Executive Director, soon to be Director of Patient Services  at Body of Christ Clinic Carolyn Insall, was approached by officials of the Belton Chamber of Commerce. They asked if she would be willing to mentor a UMHB student who was interested in starting a free women’s clinic. She said, “We see medical and dental services for the uninsured and under...

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Steve Harvey gives man’s viewpoint

Many are familiar with the comedian Steve Harvey, whether it is from listening to his syndicated radio talk show titled Steve Harvey Morning Show or watching him on TV while he hosts Family Feud or possibly because of his New York Times bestselling book, Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man. The book has  been produced into a movie which hit theaters Friday. Critics have had mixed reviews on the book. Some have referred to the book as outdated, misogynistic and ignorant. Others praise Harvey in his efforts to educate not just African-American women but all females in general. Harvey had both women and men in an uproar after they read his matter-of-fact/common sense based book. He does have valid points such as women settling for less in a man and what a woman should or should not do in a relationship. But since he is a man, unfortunately, it is from a man’s point of view. The book could have definitely been balanced out with a woman’s perspective. After having a chance to read this book, women should conclude that this is the opinion of only one man, and not all men think this way. Yes, there are some who do, but people cannot use this book solely as a guideline for their love lives. Many women wonder who Harvey thinks he is to give women relationship advice when he has been married three times and divorced twice. He also cheated on his ex-wife Mary Shackleford. The two were married for 10 years and divorced back in 2005. Shortly  after Harvey’s book was published, Shackleford shared with the media the ups and downs in their marriage claiming various infidelities and mistreatment. The question remains if one can actually take advice from someone who is far from perfect when it comes to relationships. Is there any credibility? Perhaps the most interesting chapter in the book is chapter 8, “Why Men Cheat.” Harvey tries his best to explain the reasoning behind the deed, and slightly touches on what it is like after being exposed and how to win back the woman he hurt. He said, “We are capable of calculating the collateral damage that comes with getting caught, and we know that getting back into the graces of the women we cheated on–and her mother, and her friends, and anyone else who’s sympathized with her having to resurrect herself from such a devastating life event–will require a Herculean effort.” Now, with his book hitting the big screen, it will be interesting to see it bought to life. The movie will include Megan Good, Michael Ealy, Chris Brown and many...

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The Baylorian continues into its 100th year

The Oreo cookie, the sinking of the Titanic, Girl Scouts and the Baylorian all have one thing in common–this year marks their 100th anniversary Years of artworks, poetry and short stories have graced the pages of the university’s journal. Assistant Professor and Department Chair  of the English Department Dr. Jacky Dumas and faculty adviser of the Baylorian, gives  insight about the publication. “The Baylorian is an in-house journal that is put together by students. It only publishes works by the students, faculty and alumni. It is more of a community building type of thing. A lot of the times, the alumni contributors are former student-editors,” he said. Although the publication has been around for a century, many people are not aware of it. Dumas said, “I think it is one of our best-kept secrets. There are not a whole lot of publications. In the research that I have done … very rarely do you have a school that prints a journal, much less two. We have Windhover Journal which is an international journal, and then we have the Baylorian,” The student journal is published every spring. The process begins in the fall. The spring serves to publish chosen works. There is no charge for the journal, and they are working toward an online journal. Learning of the centennial anniversary was a pleasant surprise. “We actually did not know that this was the 100th year. … We found out that (Museum Curator) Betty Sue BeeBe had issues that dated all the way back to the first issue. So what we did was publish a poem from the first edition to the 50th to the 75th– those 25 year marks,” he said. Dumas has  read some of the poems and said they are outdated, but still relevant. “The poems are actually universal. A lot of the stuff they put in those early poems still apply today,” he said. The university’s students have benefited from the publication in many ways. Students are able to build their resumes and have hands-on experience with editing and learning different software programs, as well as the chance to have some of their artwork or poems published. Senior psychology major and artwork editor Hannah Romo will have two poems, “Innate Desires” and “Barriers” appear in the publication. She said, “Poetry has always been my passion since I was young.” Senior communication major Jasmine Austin is the poetry editor and has enjoyed helping with the Baylorian and is also excited about the publication turning 100. She said, “I think it gives us another sense of history. It is so easy to say how old UMHB is, but to...

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Spotify poses a threat to top music sites

Pandora has been the chosen online radio station among the vast majority in the U.S. for quite some time. Now, a new competitor from Europe has crossed over to America — Spotify. Spotify made its debut last year in the summer and contains music from record labels such as Sony, Universal and Warner Music Group, as well as independent labels. It was founded in 2006 by Daniel Ek and Martin Lorentzon. Its headquarters are in the United Kingdom but also has offices in New York and Paris. Currently, 10 million users are registered and three million are paying. The company is powered by The Echo Nest, and its Playlist API powers the stations. It allows users to stream all the music they desire without charge for six months. The program initially launched in Europe  in the fall of 2008, and others could only get access to the app by invitation. As like Pandora, the radio station does come with limits such as various advertisements and the inability to have it on your mobile without paying for it. Spotify differs from Pandora in many ways, another being that there is not a limited number of skipping tracks. The restrictions will no longer apply if one chooses to upgrade to a premium plan. For $10 a month subscribers will be able to use the service on Android-powered phones and some, but not all, BlackBerrys. They will be allowed to sync an iPad through the app and can cache their favorite songs and listen to them while  offline. Twitter and Facebook can also be used with Spotify to share with friends the music one is listening to and vice versa. If friends are interested in an artist from another friend’s page they have not heard much about, there is an artist page, which will allow users to read a biography of an artist and provide similar songs within the same genre. Spotify has millions of songs to choose from, so searching for a favorite singer should be fairly easy. Some of today’s most popular artists can be found within the database. If someone is searching for a song by Pink, for example, Spotify allows the user to listen to her instead of taking the user to a similar artist like Katy Perry, as Pandora would. Since the days of Lime Wire and Napster are long gone, Spotify produces a better and legal alternative by giving access to free music instead of piracy. As of now, the verdict is still out on which companies will offer the best online music....

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Students find ways to raise funds for global mission trips
Mar06

Students find ways to raise funds for global mission trips

While the American economy has fallen on hard times in recent years, people are aware that on the other side of the world, things are far worse. Many students from the university have decided to donate their time to mission trips to help those in need. Although the intent to travel to another country is a good thought, raising a large sum of money for the venture can be overwhelming. Sophomore nursing major Brittany Haines is currently gathering funds to go on her first overseas mission trip this month. Haines said, “In November I started out not knowing where I was going. I thought I was going to Tijuana, but God just really opened the doors for Haiti. I actually had money saved, just birthday and Christmas money, along with my earnings from babysitting.” With a small head start in savings, she decided to continue raising money until she met her goal. “I have been selling these bracelets for $4, and a lot of people have been really generous and donated more with it. I also did a garage sale and got a lot of money from that as well,” she said. Haines also received help from friends who threw a concert for her last week in Temple to help with the final costs. Senior social work major Bethany Franz is excited about her third trip to Haiti. Since her visit last year, the country has stayed on her mind, so there was no doubt she would be doing fundraisers again for the next endeavor. “While raising money for mission trips, I have been blessed with family and friends who support me not only prayerfully but financially. I write support letters and send them to my family and friends first to inform them of the opportunity that has been presented,” she said. “I am also connected to two churches, the one I grew up in and the one I have attended since I moved to Belton, who have been faithful in supporting me financially.” For those interested in attending a mission trip, but do not know where to start, Franz gives some suggestions. She said, “I would tell them to take a leap of faith and begin fundraising in any way possible, such as selling T-shirts, having a garage sale, putting a little extra money in savings if possible, sending out support letters, or even asking friends if you could collect their extra change.” Sophomore nursing major Rebekah Sorrells will be returning to Haiti as well. This year she decided to raise money differently. She said, “The first time I went, I sent out support letters mostly to my...

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