New Light Puts Stop to Traffic Congestion
Sep10

New Light Puts Stop to Traffic Congestion

Turning onto Main Street is about to get easier because of the stoplight that is being placed on the intersection of Main and W. Ninth  Avenue near the Huckins apartments. Junior business major Cody Jackson jokingly asked, “There’s a new stoplight?” Its construction isn’t elaborate, but it’s noticeable. For students who dare to turn left onto Main Street, the stoplight is a welcomed presence. City engineer Mike Huber said, “Trying to make a left turn from Ninth Avenue onto Main Street during peak traffic times can be quite a challenge, and this signal will alleviate that problem.” Main Street, which is also Highway 317, is maintained by the Texas Department of Transportation. Huber said that TxDOT studied the intersection in what is known as a warrant study and concluded that a stoplight was necessary. “There are quite a few criteria that go into a warrant,” Huber said, “but the ultimate goal is to alleviate a problem at an intersection.” Senior business management major Mitch Goodman said that a stoplight would’ve been helpful for him in his previous years as a Crusader. With a larger student body and more potential traffic coming onto campus because of football games at Crusader Stadium, a stoplight will help reduce accidents. But will the stoplight encourage more students to use Main Street rather than Loop 121 to get to places like H-E-B and Wal-Mart? “I’ll still probably go the back way,” Jackson said. Huber said he understands the project should be completed “sometime around the end of September, if not sooner.” Perhaps as the lights of the new stadium shine on the Crusaders when they play Wesley Sept. 21, the lights of the new stoplight will be on too. Regardless of when the project is finished, the new light will provide safety for students exiting campus. Huber said, “In my professional opinion, the signal will allow for safer travel from Ninth Avenue onto Main...

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Surviving small-town summer
Aug27

Surviving small-town summer

The convulsion of a jackhammer working on Crusader Stadium beat through the silence of the Quad. Squirrels raced along vacant lawns. And President Randy O’Rear skidded along empty sidewalks in his golf cart, taking left turns with the skill of a veteran Nascar driver. “Campus is a ghost town during summer,” junior nursing major Joseph Salley said. Salley was one of a handful of students who kept UMHB company over the break. He took six hours of courses at the university and another six at Temple College. But even though campus looked bare, Sally said, “There is actually a decent amount of people here during the summer.” Enough people for a volleyball game at least. Junior history major Matt Boden said that he and his friends played “massive amounts of volleyball.” To get a group together required more effort than a regular semester. Junior economics major Ryan Sewell said, “The people that stay in Belton over summer are here for two reasons—to work and take classes. It is hard to hang out with a group of people since we all have different schedules.” Sewell worked at the Weigh Station over the summer, a college hot spot for frozen yogurt during the regular year. He spent the minimester studying abroad in Peru with the College of Business. “I qualified for free summer housing,” he said. “I decided to stay and find a job for the rest of the summer.” The summer incentive program allows residents to live in summer housing rent free if they take and complete a minimum of six course hours. There are three summer sessions: May minimester, Summer I and Summer II. Boden worked as the resident assistant for Independence Village and was one of four RAs. Boden said, “In June, I knocked out my classes.” July and August gave him time to focus on his music. When he started the summer, Boden had four incomplete songs that he was working on. “I ended up finishing a lot and writing two new (songs) while I was here … and I started recording,” he said. Belton is a town that is smaller than the shadow of a large Texas city, yet it has its own rhythm. Salley, a native Houstonian, has begun to appreciate the city in his two years at UMHB. He said, “You really see the spirit of Belton.” Sally spent his free time fishing and enjoying his church community. “You really do find interesting things to do,” he said. He attends Disciple Church, and his life group played a big part in helping him to have what he called a successful summer. “It’s hard spiritually...

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Students explore creative methods to raise funds for going on mission trips
Feb15

Students explore creative methods to raise funds for going on mission trips

Finding the funds to go on a mission trip is the most common obstabcle that students with this goal face. Several at the university have been employing their unique, creative talents to raise money for ministry. “I’ve done a little bit of everything,” junior Christian studies major Mary Parrish said, “from garage sales, to housekeeping for neighbors, to pet sitting, to selling roses made out of duct tape.” Parrish’s most successful fundraising so far has come from selling cake balls and makeup products. As more people find out what she is doing, she is making strides toward earning the money for two mission trips. One trip would be to England with the university and the second to Edinburgh, Texas, with the Antioch Church. “The only trouble I’ve had is getting started. Once the ball starts rolling, though, things go incredibly well,” Parrish said. Sophomore nursing and biology major Kia Torres got the idea to raise money for her mission trip to England this summer when her friends began to notice her jewelry. “I get asked a lot where I get my jewelry. I’m like, ‘Oh, I made it,’” Torres said. She then decided to create jewelry and sell it to friends and family. Over the Christmas break, Torres saw a YouTube video on how to create duct tape purses. She decided it was a neat, simple way to make something to sell. She has already raised half of the funds needed for her trip. Junior Christian ministries Jaclynn Koinm plans to go to England this summer as well. However, her tools to raise money differ from Torres’. Rather than using beads and duct tape, Koinm is working with paint, canvas and buttons. “I’m making personalized canvases for people, and I’m selling them for $15,” she said. Koinm wanted to do something innovative. “I wanted to come up with something original that no one was doing,” she said. “I know some people are making jewelry, and I didn’t want to do the same thing.” Koinm estimates that her works have raised around $300. For her, the canvases are more than just a fundraiser. She enjoys being creative, and encourages others to do something they enjoy when trying to raise money for their own mission endevours. “Definitely do what you like to do,” Koinm said. “I think it’s fun to do stuff you enjoy….People like that.” Torres explained that it is not always easy to raise money in creative ways. “It’s hard to actually put in the effort to do it,” she said. Through all of the work, she feels like God has shown her many things, and it has given...

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Pennsylvania governor files lawsuit against NCAA regarding sanctions
Jan29

Pennsylvania governor files lawsuit against NCAA regarding sanctions

Rain silently poured on the top of a squad car that would shuttle one of Pennsylvania State’s assistant football coaches, Jerry Sandusky, to a nearby county jail. Onlookers clutched their umbrellas as they witnessed what would be a dreary course of events for the University of Pennsylvania in the days to come. On Nov. 5, 2011, Sandusky was arrested due to suspicions of having inappropriate relations with several young boys, and was to be tried for child abuse. Four days later, head football coach Joe Paterno and the university’s president Graham Spanier were fired for their lack of diligence to report Sandusky’s criminal actions. The following months proved to be a fiasco as decisions were made in the case. On Jan. 22, Joe Paterno passed away. Everything that had once been cherished by Penn State seemed to have been taken. The outcome resulted in Sandusky being accused of 45 out of 48 counts of sexual abuse. More than that, the NCAA had to choose the proper course of action to take on the university. Political science Professor Dr. David Holcomb said that he has no expertise in this sort of case, but that he could see the two prominent viewpoints that people held as to what the NCAA should rule considering Sandusky’s acts. “Some will argue that the NCAA’s move is problematic since there are no specific rules violations in the Penn State case,” Holcomb said. “Others will argue that the situation was so heinous and directly connected to a prominent NCAA athletics team that the NCAA had to act.” The NCAA took the latter route and decided to penalize the university. Penn State was forced to pay a $60 million fine, while the football program was deemed ineligible from bowl games during the next four seasons. The team was also forced to give up 40 of its scholarships during those four years. These sanctions crippled the school. Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett has decided the NCAA was too harsh on the university. The entire state of Pennsylvania has been affected by the rulings because it is a state-funded university. Junior finance and accounting major Cody Lee said, “I don’t think he had in mind that the NCAA was going to hit Penn State that hard.” Corbett decided earlier this month to sue the organization as a result of the penalties placed on the university. He said, “These sanctions … punished the past, the present, the local businesses and the citizens of Pennsylvania,” at a news conference held at Penn State university at the end of December. It has certainly been a rough road for the school. The NCAA also...

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Unappreciated sacrifice
Dec06

Unappreciated sacrifice

They’re all around you. At the grocery store, at your church, you can find them anywhere. They can be young or old, a man or a woman, a father or a daughter. Veterans are our heroes and the reason our nation has enjoyed and realized the fullness of independence. As the old saying goes, the cost of freedom isn’t free. Since the time that George Washington and his soldiers sailed the Potomac to fight for our posterity, millions of brave warriors have died. The countless sacrifices made, pile so high that a simple thank you is the least one can offer to a veteran. However, as generations have come and gone, so has the nation’s respect for its heroes. Rather than be grateful, we are greedy; rather than placing our hand over our heart, we focus our attention on political agendas. This shouldn’t be. We should take the time to show appreciation to the men and women who care enough about us to risk their lives. There are several ways we can do that. If you see men or women with veterans attire or head wear on, take the time to approach, ask them about their day, and then thank them for their service. Sometimes nursing homes or independent living centers will host Veterans Day events and invite the public to attend. If you see an advertisement for such an event in your area, you can spend an hour of your day to talk with an older hero. Many of us have veterans in our families. Whether it is a cousin who fought in Iraq or a grandfather who endured the Korean War, chances are you know a soldier. Take the time to write or give them a call. It can be anytime, but with intentions of sending a simple message—”We care about you.” To the average person, such communication may seem trivial, but to the veteran it makes a world of difference. These warriors have been through serious struggles, and, often, scars from battle don’t heal in a lifetime. Contact from a family member provides an extra ounce of strength to endure the emotional and psychological bullets still flying their way. Currently you can send care packages to soldiers fighting the war on terrorism. Websites such as operationgratitude.com and herobox.org provide ways for citizens to send care packages to military men and women. These sites also provide ways for donations to be made to the soldiers’ families. Imagine the joy fathers or mothers must feel while Skyping with their children to see them embracing a new stuffed animal. When thanking our veterans, it’s the little things that count....

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