Tony Campolo challenges chapel students to take Christ

Tony Campolo speaks an average of 350 times a year; he has written 39 books, but most importantly, he is a Christian. Campolo is professor emeritus of sociology at Eastern University in St. Davids, Pa. He has achieved numerous awards and has appeared on talk shows all over the nation. However, he never thinks he is too big for anyone and will go anywhere to talk about Jesus as long as God permits. His speaking journey brought him to UMHB’s chapel Sept 19, and Campolo had a special challenge for the student body: take Christ at his words. Junior nursing major Taylor Frank said, “He came on really strong on some parts. I thought he was a very passionate speaker who is really enthused about what he believes.” Part of Campolo’s strength is being able to share his conviction with fire and intensity. This has helped him connect with his audience as he shares his message. He said “It’s not so much a technique as it is a passion.” There are no secrets or acrostics Campolo uses when speaking. He simply tells what is on his heart. Part of what he says his soul longs for is to take care of the needy, and in doing so, Campolo has partnered with Compassion International, a Christian child advocacy ministry. He became involved in the organization after he established a child support system in Haiti. “We developed a program, and it wasn’t working well,” Campolo said. “Compassion contacted me and said ‘We understand you are having trouble working out your system. We’ve got the system. If you want to support kids, do it through us.’” After Compassion came in to help the children Campolo was supporting, he realized the strength of their program and quickly became an advocate for them. Now he travels to speak on their behalf. Sophomore computer science major Will Stence said, “He brought my attention to the poverty, and he brought the reality of it all to the surface.” He did more than just speak on Compassion. Campolo inserted a personal challenge to each individual in attendance. He called believers to take Christ and to follow his every command. For students to do this, Campolo said they must do two things. The first is to forsake a love for materialistic pleasures. “You’re spending huge amounts of money to buy stuff you really don’t need, to impress people you don’t know, with money you don’t have,” he said. Consumerism is a force that plagues everyone. Campolo also said students must recognize God’s blessing of youth. “You really need to understand that youth was made for heroism and not...

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‘Lone Star Bowl’

For years the Dallas Cowboys have been America’s team, the poster child of the NFL. There are now two sheriffs in the Lone Star State, the Houston Texans have bolted out to win their first four games—a first for the team. Both organizations have lofty goals as the season begins, and fans expect a lot from the two teams. Some say that this year the Cowboys and Texans will face each other in the Super Bowl. Junior International business major Mitchell Goodman thinks it’s possible. “It will be Texans versus Cowboys in the Super Bowl,” Goodman said.”I feel like the Texas teams have great hope, almost as much as the Cru football team.” Though it may be a long shot, an in-state battle for the Lombardi trophy is possible. It just so happens that the two Texas teams are in different conferences The Cowboys are in the NFC while the Texans are in the AFC. The teams are not scheduled to play in the regular season, a Cowboys-Texans showdown might be viewed on the biggest stage of all, the Super Bowl. Many things will have to fall perfectly in place if the teams are to meet up in New Orleans, the site of the 2013 Super Bowl. For one, the Texans will have to stay healthy. In past seasons, good health has been a rare thing for the Texans. The team’s big three, running back Arian Foster, wide receiver Andre Johnson and quarterback Matt Schaub, were seldom on the field together last season due to injuries. Now, all three are in the mix and can create nightmares for opposing defenses. Dallas’ problem is not their defense, but their offense. Freshman Ross Phipps said the team is weakest up front. “Their offensive line isn’t the best, and, of course, Tony Romo holds on to the ball too long.” After losing to Seattle, the Cowboys’ offense struggled against a relentless Tampa Bay defense. They put up only 16 points, and their only touchdown was set up by an interception by linebacker Sean Lee. One thing is certain: the Cowboys and Texans both have solid defensive units. The Texans are led by their juggernaut defensive end J.J. Watt. In his first three games, he has already tied last year’s sacks for the regular season. Freshman Christian ministries major Jaron Haas said, “Watt is pretty dang good. I wouldn’t want to run against him. That’s just terrifying.” The same can be said of Cowboys linebackers. Outside backers Anthony Spencer and DeMarcus Ware add versatility on the edges, while inside backers Lee and Bruce Carter plug running lanes. The two could face off at...

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Chapel speakers offer spiritual growth, faith and new opportunities
Sep11

Chapel speakers offer spiritual growth, faith and new opportunities

It’s Wednesday. You can taste the weekend, but you can’t quite savor its goodness because a long week of classes has left your taste buds bland. It’s that day in the week where your life seems like an uphill battle. As you look through your schedule, you remember you have chapel and feel like the day will drag on forever. But the opposite can be true if you give chapel a chance. Since the school was founded in 1845, chapel has been a key contributor in enriching the lives of students. Sophomore history major Matthew Boden said, “Chapel helps to get me back in a right mindset.” Throughout the week, students find themselves struggling to keep their priorities in line. Classes, projects, sporting events, you name it; they all take a toll on the production of the individual. “It’s a good reminder of why I’m at school, and why I came to UMHB,” Boden said. “I came for the spiritual aspect.” Amid the pressures students face, it can be tough to keep everything straight. Chapel helps to assist students. If anyone knows of the need for guidance, it would be Tyson Dever. March 11, 2005, is a day he will never forget. A car crash, a smorgasbord of surgeries and a wheel chair brought Dever to UMHB seven years later to speak to university students about his life. Through his struggles, Dever found inspiration and direction through God and family. In the August 29 chapel he said, “There are so many distractions that we need solid reinforcement in our lives. Chapel affects students’ lives in a huge way. It’s important to attend chapel and really take it seriously. It’s just a good thing to keep you on track.” Each week students hear from speakers who are dedicated to running after admirable goals. University Chaplain Dr. George Loutherback is in charge of booking speakers for chapel, and he aims high. “I’m going after people who are influential not only in the city but in the country,” he said. The list of speakers this fall could be considered a Dream Team. People like Dina Dwyer-Owens, who has served as chairwoman and chief executive officer for The Dwyer Group and spoke September 5. She is best known for her clandestine role in Season 3 of CBS’ thrilling show Undercover Boss. Also coming is Kimberly Spradlin, winner of the One World season of Survivor, and Paul Young, author of the Christian novel The Shack. All the speakers offer students a rare opportunity to learn from people who have succeded in life, who have overcome great trials, and who are committed to living in...

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Cru football kicks off its 15th season
Sep11

Cru football kicks off its 15th season

Comebacks have long been the epitome of sports history. From the Buffalo Bills’ Steve Christie booting the 32-yard field goal to cap off ‘the comeback’ against the Houston Oilers to Tracy McGrady’s 13 points in 35 seconds to overcome the Spurs, every sport has witnessed the impossible. A comeback was brewing for the Cru as they were overcoming a 21-3 deficit against the Wesley Wolverines last December. On a fourth and three, quarterback LiDarral Bailey and the offense were surging down the field, creating a miracle, but as he stepped to pass, he was hit from behind, incomplete. A defender was able to overcome the protection of the offensive line and disrupt the pass attempt. Head line coach Joe George said, “I don’t remember what the break-down was there, but we’ve put that behind us because we’re looking forward.” With the new season, expectations are high for the team — unanimously picked to once again be the American Southwest Conference champions. The Crusaders picked up each of the 24 first-place votes, signaling that not only the UMHB nation, but its opponents as well, see the team as the forerunner this season. To remain out in front, the team will rely on the men up front—the big dogs, the offensive line. While most fans are enamored with the quarterbacks and focused on where the ball is, they miss a vital part of the game. Down in the trenches the offensive linemen battle to keep the ball moving. Without a solid performance from the line, it’s unlikely that the Cru will have any chance of winning. Junior finance major Cody Lee plays offensive tackle. He said “All of our goals are to win a national championship; it’s the standard that we are holding ourselves to.” With each day being an opportunity to improve, the Crusader line knows the importance of taking care of every detail—”even in practice,” Lee said. “We want to practice like champions and to continue to work that way.” The linemen are prepared for the season, and they know what it takes to be the leaders of a solid offensive attack. Senior EXSS major Sam Maxie plays offensive tackle, and after starting 13 games last season, he provides the talent and experience the team needs. “We’ve got to come together. As soon as we have a lot of chemistry on the offensive line, that’s when things really start rolling,” Maxie said. In a base set, there are five linemen working together to make sure that the players who score the points can get there in the first place. “We want to be fundamentally sound, and when we’re fundamentally...

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Christian rappers encourage campus men
Sep11

Christian rappers encourage campus men

Churches aren’t usually associated with screaming, turntables, rockers and rappers, but Crossroads Church in Belton doesn’t mind. Just before the fall semester began, Crossroads hosted its Back to School Bash where middle school through college-aged students enjoyed a free concert before the stresses of school began. The event was part of the church’s 212generation program, which teaches 12-to-24 -year-olds how to live right and to be on fire for God. We As Humans, a heavy metal rock band, and J-Nice the Kingdom Builder, an up-and-coming Christian rapper, performed at the beginning of the show, but most of the attention was given to another.   Well-known Christian Rapper Derek Minor, formerly known as Pro, was the show’s finale. Freshman Christian ministries major Shane Longoria was part of a group of six who attended the concert with the university organization Campus Men. “He produces a quality product. Everything about his music was solid, and he’s a Christian,” Longoria said. Born Derek Johnson Jr., now rapper Derek Minor endured many trials to be performing on stages. He faced a life where his biological father lived several hours away, so music became his everything, his getaway. Although he is a respected rapper, Minor also takes time to share what is on his heart during his performance. Freshman Christian ministries major Tim Hite said, “The thing that stuck out to me the most was when he quit performing and started talking about our eternal purpose.” Minor hadn’t always been so eager to share the gospel, however. After the death of his grandparents and his godmother, he realized that life wasn’t all he had thought it to be, so he surrendered himself and his talents to God. He then released his debut album The Black Out, which caused a fuss for its lack of Christian focus. “Lecrae and BJ challenged me to let the gospel truly affect my heart,” Minor said in an interview with Newreleasetuesday.com. Lecrae was one of the first Christian rappers to capture the attention of the nation, and at that moment God used him to refocus Minor. Now Minor shares the truth he has found in God. He just teaches a little differently. “He has lyrical theology,” Longoria said “His lyrics are basically like sermons. He’s just preaching. He uses his time to preach the gospel.” During the concert, Minor did just that. “He said that when we die, are we going to leave a legacy that people remember, or are we just going to leave nothing behind,” Hite said. After the concert, Campus Men began working on building relationships, and growing as godly men. Group leader junior sport management major...

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