SEC Cites work of Student, Professor

It isn’t every day that a student’s research done at the university is referred to by a large entity of the United States government. However, that is exactly what happened regarding research done by business professor Larry Locke with the assistance of senior journalism/mass communication and economics double major Ethan Mitra and  Locke’s daughter, Virginia Locke. After months of research, Locke and the others completed a paper relating the information they discovered. The findings were published in a Clute Institute academic journal. Following that, the work of Locke and Mitra was cited in a recent Securities and Exchange Commission proposal. “What it means is from Belton, Texas, we’re able to contribute to this conversation that’s going on about how do we fix this. And Ethan gets to be a part of that conversation that’s going on in Washington, and that’s cool for him,” Locke said. Mitra took on the meticulous task of compiling the numbers they were dealing with into a large database. “It definitely required a lot of weekends of work. It wasn’t the most glamorous work,” he said. “It is common for economists and other researchers that have to do the nitty-gritty work, which involves scouring over numbers to build the actual database.” Once the publishers gave a deadline for the research to be published, Mitra had a goal to aim toward. He is grateful for the opportunity to work with Locke on the project. “Dr. Locke is an encouraging person,” Mitra said. “He definitely had to keep me on track a lot of the times, and I’m glad for that.” He added that the experience helped increase his understanding of the short-term credit market and also that some of the most important tasks don’t initially seem to be significant. “The perspective it’s given me is … a lot of people in life are going to be just a small part of the machine that helps drive the engine. And it might seem like it’s a small job, but it’s essential. It’s important. I think it’s important to live by that principle and understand that,” Mitra said. Locke spoke highly of the effort that Mitra devoted to the research. “This kind of work, it requires a great deal of determination and a lot of commitment and really a strong attention to detail,” he said. Since the recession in 2008, economists and policy makers alike have worked to prevent such a collapse from occurring again. Many of these efforts focus on regulating money market mutual funds, which invest in short-term debt securities. “If our research can contribute to helping fix what’s wrong with how these markets are working...

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Convocation Kicks Off Acdemic Year
Sep10

Convocation Kicks Off Acdemic Year

Convocation was far from typical this year. Those who attended were honored with the presence of UMHB’s oldest living graduate as well as the  former owner of the Houston Astros and university donor Drayton McLane Jr., who was the keynote speaker. After a performance by One Voice at the Aug. 28 event, university President, Dr. Randy O’Rear, took the podium to announce the naming of the business school to the McLane College of Business. He recognized McLane and his family for their contributions to the university, and the new football stadium. “This is a great day to be a part of Mary Hardin-Baylor,” O’Rear said. “Most of you are probably aware that this magnificent facility next door wouldn’t have been possible. It wouldn’t be there today, without the very generous investment that Elizabeth and Drayton McLane and their family made for Crusader Stadium and the new student union building.” O’Rear also spoke briefly about the life of McLane and how he has influenced the community in so many ways. “Most of us are well aware of the great success that he and his family have enjoyed in life and in business,” he said. “We are aware of their great philanthropy, for the investments they’ve made in our community and others.” After O’Rear announced the renaming of the College of Business, McLane took the podium and addressed the audience. “We’re here today because of what others have done for us in the past and how they’ve influenced us and made us into who we are today,” he said. “I congratulate you students that are freshmen or sophomores or wherever you are in your career, that you have selected this (university). This is going to make a wonderful impact on your life forever.” He has been a strong advocate of higher Christian education for years, being heavily involved with the university and Baylor University as well as others. “Mary Hardin-Baylor, for 168 years, has been dedicated to teaching young people and preparing them for their future, not just in their profession but as Christian human beings and how they can influence the world. So I congratulate you for doing this,” McLane said. He closed his speech by sharing with the audience four thoughts that the dean of his graduate school had told him before he graduated. McLane related the four points he had been told years ago and urged students to dare to dream, to operate out of their imagination not their memory, to seek adversity and to walk with elephants. He encouraged students to be big people who shake things up. Another distinguished guest at Convocation was the oldest living...

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McLane College of Business
Sep10

McLane College of Business

Gracing the face of UMHB’s College of Business is the name of Drayton McLane Jr., one of the most successful Texas businessmen in the past few decades. On Aug. 28, university president Dr. Randy O’Rear announced that the College of Business will now be named the McLane College of Business. The decision was made public at Convocation, right before McLane addressed the audience as the keynote speaker. “It’s a great honor…. At first we didn’t think we deserved something like this, but they continued to talk to us, and we felt it was a great honor and we just feel very honored to be associated with the university,” McLane said in a press conference after Convocation. He also talked about his involvement in the community and university. “I’ve always felt a part of UMHB, and we have made contributions in the past. I’ve made talks at the business school over the last few years and felt a part of it even though I didn’t go to school here,” he said. McLane is the former owner of the Houston Astros, member of a successful family business and strong supporter of Christian universities. “I think what we need in America and in Texas more is higher Christian education. Christian universities are kind of declining in population .… I think a certain amount of the population really wants to be involved in Christian higher education.” He is not the only one who feels honored to have his name associated with the university. Interim dean of the College of Business Dr. Paul Stock is happy to have the name McLane recognized with the college. “We’re pretty excited about it. Drayton McLane and the McLane family have had a relationship with UMHB for a long time. And it kind of raises the bar for us because the way the McLane family stands for integrity and honesty and community service with Christian values, and we’re hoping it really inspires our students and faculty going forward,” Stock said. McLane was born in Cameron, Texas, and after attending college, he returned to Cameron where he began working the family’s wholesale grocery business. Being family did not provide him any shortcuts to success. O’Rear retold the story, saying McLane’s father “believed that to be an effective leader, you had to earn the respect of all of the employees. So he offered Drayton a job loading trucks on the night shift.” Over the next 20 years, McLane worked his way through the ranks of the business and eventually became the executive vice president. In 1978 he became the president and chief executive officer. The McLane Company is a food...

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Running Man No More
Sep10

Running Man No More

For the first time in years, students will not be able to hold the traditional running man game due to the Belton police forbidding the activity from continuing. The first running man event of the school year was set to take place Aug. 23 until students found that it had become illegal. Running man was the ultimate competition of speed, stealth and wit on campus. Students donned dark clothing and after congregating at the softball and baseball parking lot, sprint across campus trying to make their way to the Meyer Christian Studies Building without being spotted by drivers who patrol the roads looking for runners. As can be guessed, there have been some problems with the logistics of running man. Students often got lost or ended up in the back yards of Belton residents. On one such occasion, two years ago, I was a freshman enjoying the thrill of a game of running man, when I discovered that I, along with a large group of other runners, were lost on what may or may not have been campus property. Students fell into poison ivy and others fell into one of the creeks we crossed before we eventually made our way back onto campus. Without proper guidelines and familiarity of the area, students can wander off and maybe end up having to jump the fences of Belton residents. This is where the real problem occurs. If a local resident sees two or three people dressed in black slinking around their backyard, that person may call the police or even get out a shotgun, and who could blame them? After all, clichés like “We don’t dial 911” and “Shoot first. Ask questions later” are considered proverbs by many Texans. Because of this potential for catastrophe, running man will no longer be a part the UMHB tradition, but question to ask is why now? Could it be possible to change the criteria boundaries of the game in order to make it better? It has been an ongoing ritual for years, but the event has just now been stopped. The growth of the university is likely a reason. More students coming to campus means more students participating in running man, which theoretically leads to more lost students stumbling through someone’s back yard. Another con of running man happens to be when a runner is spotted by a truck. To signify that a player is out of the game, the caught person climbs into the back of the truck and spends the rest of the game looking for others still sneaking toward Meyer. Obviously, this leads to a large number of students squeezing into the back of...

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Music state championship brings high school students and their instruments to campus
Apr17

Music state championship brings high school students and their instruments to campus

The campus was alive with the sound of music as students from across the state flocked to Belton to compete in the Texas Association of Private and Parochial Schools state competition for solos and ensembles April 12-13. Voice events were held at First Baptist Church in Belton while all instrumentals took place at UMHB. Audiences were allowed inside of Presser, Shelton Theater, Mayborn campus center and FBC’s sanctuary to listen to the students’ music. Awty International School of Houston teacher Sina Thompson talked about the determination that students show in preparation for the contest. “They’ve worked so hard to get here,” Thompson said. “They compete in other events besides this one.… I’m really, really proud of them.” She also talked about the growing popularity and strength of the music program at her school. In years past, Awty has not been known necessarily as a strong music school. “I heard a couple of the kids on the bus today. One said ‘why are we going to this?’ and the other said ‘because we’re good,’” Thompson said. “And so they’re proud of their work, and it motivates them to keep going.” Sprawled across the quad and filling the SUB were students with trumpets, saxophones, violins, cellos,  guitars, basses, drums and more. String quartets could be seen practicing under the shade of trees, drum lines seated under a large tent kept a perpetual beat and duets and trios alike found isolated corners to practice. In short, a beautiful cacophony of sound flooded the campus. TAPPS State Music Director Vena Williams orchestrated the event in coordination with the university. She hoped a critical review of students’ performances would help them improve their talents. “The God-given talents of the students are challenged to meet a standard … (so) we can measure their progress,” Williams said. “We want our students to develop their talent into the best they can be. The students and directors leave the event with information concerning what they can do to improve their skills.” Members of Kappa Kappa Psi served as volunteers to help run the event. “We have people stationed everywhere around campus to help various events that are going down,” sophomore church music major and group parliamentarian Lantz Crosthwait said. Williams praised the work the university did to help the contest go smoothly. She said, “UMHB faculty and staff and FBC staff put forth a tremendous effort for our organization and our students. The remarkable work done by the UMHB team makes this State event...

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